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In this short podcast episode, Bryan talks even more about sine waves and center-tapped transformers. Power is generated at the power plant when an energy source (such as steam) is used to drive a drive shaft. The resulting current can be mapped as sine waves, which actually represent points on a circle; there is a rotational magnetic field around stationary conductors, and the sine waves allow us to envision the positive and negative alternations as the rotation happens. Center-tapped transformers use “neutral” as a reference point. The secondary winding on a center-tapped transformer may have 240v power, but the center tap splits that 240v power into two legs of 120v power. There are two sine waves completely out of phase with each other, so we get 240v from peak to peak. Both sine waves cross at neutral. Even though the split-phase power consists of two separate sine waves, an oscilloscope would interpret the voltage as a single up-and-down wave with a higher peak and a lower valley. Center-tapped transformers do not necessarily create another phase of power; they merely turn neutral into a reference. If we were to measure that split-phase power as a single 120v sine wave with an oscilloscope, we would have to use neutral as our reference. To measure the separate sine waves for a total of 240v, we would need three probes: a reference at neutral and one reference on each side. Many European countries only use a single sine wave; center-tapped transformers are not commonplace in those countries, and neither is split-phase power. However, the split-phase power in the USA allows for more versatility; we can supply power to 120v appliances where we would otherwise need to use 240v ones.   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Bryan describes the tricky concept of power factor and why we should care about it. He also compares power factor to a beer mug to make the topic easier to understand. Power is often represented on a sine wave, which is a curvy line that marks the state of electrical energy at different points on a circle. Power gets stronger and weaker, and it goes above and below the neutral line depending on the excess or deficit of electrons. Unity power factor refers to a power factor of 1, indicating that voltage and amperage are perfectly balanced; there is no lag. However, an inductance (a form of resistance) opposes the current and causes an imbalance between current and voltage. Power loss or quality refers to the difference between the input and output power that results.  Apparent power refers to volt-amps, which we’d traditionally consider to be the wattage; however, in an inductive load, the true or real power (wattage) accounts for that power loss and comes from volts x amps x power factor. We can imagine power factor as a mug of beer: apparent power (VA) is the entire mug, the foam is reactive power (wasted), and the beer itself is real power. The power company only charges for the real power, not the reactive power. However, a power factor closer to unity can help prevent motor windings or wires from overheating. To get closer to unity power factor, we need to make sure we have a run capacitor of the correct size. You can measure power factor with a power quality meter. Bryan also covers: Voltage and current Root mean square Inductive reactance Capacitance and how capacitors work Transformer VA ratings   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Bryan lays down some motor speed facts in about 10 minutes in this short podcast episode. We can figure out how quickly a single-phase motor (PSC) will run if we understand how many cycles it will make per second. In the USA, the standard hertz is 60 Hz (60 rotations or magnetic alternations per second). Motors are inductive loads that create an electromagnetic field with a spinning rotor and stationary stator; the amount of poles on the stator determines how quickly the rotor spins (RPM). In the RPM counts, there are some allowances for slip. Slip varies depending on the load, with excessive loads causing more slip. Some multi-tap blowers have additional winding resistance and decreased current (due to the extra taps), which increase the slip. The rated load RPM usually accounts for the RPM at high speed, not medium or low speed with added resistance. On the other hand, variable-speed motors or ECMs are powered by a variable frequency (sometimes a variable frequency drive or VFD). The motor control takes the incoming electrical frequency and converts it into a new frequency (turning AC power to DC and controlling the cycle rate). These motors also tend to be more efficient as a result. The RPM is more variable on these motors with VFDs, whereas we could only manipulate the RPM of single-phase motors by changing the number of poles. When replacing a motor, you can’t use a replacement motor with a higher rated RPM than the original motor. The only way to change the RPM is to get a new motor with a different number of poles, increase slip to make it slower or decrease slip to bring it closer to synchronous speed, or adjust the frequency.     If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Neil Comparetto and John Semmelhack of the Comfort Squad join Bryan to discuss high-quality value design in a high-performance home. They explain how they design HVAC systems (heat pumps) for low-load homes in ways that are affordable, efficient, and comfortable. High-performance, low-load homes need to be energy-efficient AND comfortable, and it can be a challenge to get both. Manual J calculations aren’t as common as they probably should be, and it can be difficult to get accurate data about air leakage, power consumption, and radiant gains as well. So, John and Neil try to collect their own data and do aggressive load calculations to avoid the fudge factors that are all too common. The air velocity inside the ducts tends to be lower in these sorts of systems. When you have relatively low airflow in the ductwork of high-performance homes, you don’t need as many ducts or for the ductwork to be particularly large. With minimalistic ductwork, supply register placement, face velocity, and throw become very important, especially because those factors are responsible for air mixing. When the duct design conditions are right and the load has been matched, you typically get long runtimes and good air mixing. In many cases, John and Neil use variable-speed motors in their outdoor units that allow for high heating performance. The capacity ranges are wide, allowing the units to run even during exceptionally low-load conditions. They also use flex ducts due to their pre-insulation, noise suppression, and inexpensiveness; they just try to keep it sealed and avoid compressing the ductwork.  Neil, John, and Bryan also discuss: Monitoring load conditions with software Design considerations for filter grilles and central returns Room pressurization and airflow testing Transfer grilles The Coanda effect and curved-blade registers Vent sizing Flex duct installation best practices Duct fittings ERVs   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Lacey Dietz with METUS and Scott Arnold with Rycor HVAC join the podcast to talk about how the industry can start putting contractor success first. They talk about Mitsubishi Electric (METUS)’s commitment to contractor success and what that looks like. METUS’s contractor program aims to provide training, support, and recognition to create a community of successful contractors. Support comes in the form of marketing, training, tech support, and customer service, and those services are available to contractors who sell and represent Mitsubishi’s products. As a contractor who works with Mitsubishi, Scott has been able to specialize the labor in his business and grow his business as one that specializes in installing Mitsubishi systems. Mitsubishi also provided top-quality training and allowed Scott to streamline his training process and get his apprentices feeling confident and ready to go into the field quickly. Adoption rates for Mitsubishi’s ductless technology have increased over the past couple of years, especially as people have spent more time in their homes and started re-thinking indoor comfort. Those who are educated about heat pumps also tend to appreciate the technology as well as the mini-split units’ small footprints in their homes. The mini-split units’ smaller environmental impact than unitary systems is also a plus.  Lacey, Scott, and Bryan also discuss: Scott’s work with heat pumps in New York Programs that benefit contractors Mitsubishi’s products and supply chain management Diamond Contractor program and tiered contractors Mitsubishi’s lead generation program and referrals Ductless vs. unitary systems Bringing education into sales Dealing with business growth in a challenging labor market Overcoming objections   Learn more about Mitsubishi and its products, visit https://www.mitsubishicomfort.com/, and you can learn how to become a contractor at https://discover.mitsubishicomfort.com/contractors.   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Retrotec - IBS 2022

Retrotec - IBS 2022

2022-04-2608:40

Sam Myers with Retrotec talks to Bryan about pressures in the home and why they matter for HVAC solutions at IBS 2022. Technicians focus a lot on ductwork and airflow, but many of them don’t focus on how the building envelope impacts HVAC performance. A lot of the HVAC equipment’s performance is affected by the push and pull of air caused by leaky areas in the building envelope. If you have a room with too much air and another room with too little, you will have unbalanced pressures. Unbalanced pressures may result in discomfort and latent load issues, especially when unconditioned air is pulled in through the attic. Sealing the envelope well and using dampers as necessary can minimize the comfort issues caused by pressure imbalances in the home. Instead of just using manometers for static and gas pressure, we can also use high-resolution manometers under doors to pick up pressure differences. However, the manometer MUST be high-res to pick up those subtle (but palpable) differences in pressure. A blower door is also a great tool, especially when you use it with a thermal imaging camera; the blower door amplifies the temperature effects that a thermal camera will detect, especially if you also have a good delta T.   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Birmingham training class

Birmingham training class

2022-04-2102:42:39

This podcast is a class that Bryan taught for BTrained in Birmingham, AL. He covers troubleshooting, installation, and commissioning best practices with a focus on the fundamentals. To be a good troubleshooter, you must be able to find the problem, identify the source of the problem, fix the problem, and optimize performance based on your data, the customer’s comments, and your observations. The Five Pillars of diagnosis aren’t comprehensive diagnostic or charging criteria, but they can help you charge or diagnose a system. Isolation diagnosis works best for electrical components; you isolate the problem area from the system and see how the system works without the suspected issue. If the system operates normally without the component in question, then we can conclude that our hypothesis about the “problem” part was correct. Wide-narrow-wide troubleshooting is an approach that allows you to inspect the entire system, zero in on the problem, and optimize the entire system. By starting wide, going narrow, and going wide again, you can troubleshoot holistically. Installations take place in several phases: pre-planning, planning, demo, installation, and commissioning. Many people place a lot of emphasis on the demo and installation and neglect the conversations and procedures associated with pre-planning, planning, and commissioning. Bryan also covers: Heuristics and mental shortcuts Evaporation vs. boiling Rules of thumb Head pressure, suction pressure, and compression ratio Energy transfer fundamentals What superheat and subcooling really indicate Restrictions and temperature drop Delta T “Redneck” compressor test Testing circuits Useful measurements and test instrumentation Causes of compressor failure Measuring airflow Low vs. high static pressure Bringing tribal knowledge to building design Ductless systems, ventilating dehumidification, and sensible heat ratio Manual J, attics, and combustion air Radiant barriers and heat transfer Supply relative humidity Dehumidifier configuration and system design Bad envelopes Vented attics Duct upgrades Total effective length and turning vanes Evacuation   Learn more about BTrained at https://btrained.net/ or on the BTrained YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnlDsWHT68gVwPrYYO5vhrw.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Bryan has a bit of an industry nerd out with Ross Trethewey from “This Old House” and TE2 Engineering at IBS 2022 (the International Builders’ Show). Ross’s education and career have focused on mechanical engineering, especially with sustainable solutions. In building science, the key mindset is to think of the building as a system. Using that school of thought, Ross has developed building science and HVAC solutions that also consider indoor air quality and ventilation, such as hybrid VRF systems.  Many of Ross’s solutions take the best aspects of air-source and ground-source heat pumps and apply those to hydronics. Some exciting applications for those types of systems could include simultaneous heating and cooling as well as the integration of domestic hot water. Demand control ventilation has been used for a long time in the commercial world, but its possible use in residential applications is another exciting thing to consider. With proper control devices, DCV would give us the opportunity to control temperature, humidity, VOCs, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and radon. In residential applications, DCV has to be a delicate balancing act, as bringing in too much outdoor air would require us to condition that air. High latent loads also present challenges to some of the ventilation solutions in development. Serviceability is another challenge to DCV usage in residential applications; whenever an innovative system is brought to the market, very few people will know how to fix and maintain those systems. One of the possible solutions is to create instruction manuals and give education similar to what already exists for package units. 3D models and animations also help make complicated systems easier to understand. Ross’s presence on “This Old House” marks the third generation of Tretheweys on the show. Ross is excited to talk about building science and HVAC innovations and concepts while on the show. Heat pumps are also getting better, especially due to inverter-driven compressors, enhanced vapor injection, advanced control systems, and ECMs. Heat pumps are safer than gas-fired equipment, and we have made them work well in subzero temperatures (because we’re nowhere near absolute zero). If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
In this podcast, Bryan goes through the entire process of replacing a compressor step-by-step. This process is what the Kalos team uses to replace a failed compressor and make sure it doesn’t fail again. Before replacing a compressor, you must figure out how the compressor failed; grounded conditions often lead to acid, so it’s a good idea to test for acid and see if you need to address a burnout. In any case, make sure you have the correct tools for the job (including a compatible replacement compressor). When you arrive at the job site, be sure to confirm the diagnosis and check to see if the unit has a hard start kit. That’s also the time to do a visual inspection, checking airflow as well as the filter, blower, and coil cleanliness. Recover and weigh out the refrigerant charge. Unscrew the foot bolts and lift the old compressor out. Then, seal the compressor once it’s out. If you’re dealing with burnout, clean out or replace the accumulator (you will install/reinstall it shortly). Cut out and replace the existing liquid line drier and install a suction drier in a place where it can be easily removed.   When piping in the new compressor, make sure you protect heat-sensitive parts and do a quality brazing job. Install the new capacitor and hard start kit, too, keeping wiring away from places where it may chafe. Test for leaks, evacuate the system, charge the system, and check your five pillars as well as voltage. Finish by cleaning the drain and double-checking airflow. Bryan also covers: Misdiagnosed compressor failure Parts needed for replacing a compressor What makes a compatible replacement compressor? Billing and pricing Alloys and fluxes Replacing TXVs, capacitors, contactors, and reversing valves Cutting vs. unsweating  Suction driers and pressure drop Charging considerations   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
In this short podcast, Bryan explains what it means to top off, drop in, and retrofit refrigerants. He describes the differences between those three things to dispel some of the confusion they may cause. Topping off a system means that you add refrigerant to a low existing charge to get it back up to a normal level. In some cases, people top off systems with dissimilar refrigerants (e.g., topping off R-22 systems with cheaper R-407C). Topping off a system with a dissimilar refrigerant is unacceptable, as it’s against EPA guidelines and leaves you with an undefined refrigerant mixture. You’re only supposed to top off a system with the same refrigerant that’s already in it. High-glide refrigerant blends can be tricky to top off when there is a leak, as one refrigerant type may leak more quickly than the other and leave you with a different chemical profile. So, you’re better off recovering and starting over when you have lost a significant amount of charge to a leak. If you want to recharge an entire system by recovering the existing charge, you would instead be using a “drop-in” refrigerant. There are no drop-in solutions for R-410A systems. However, some commercial equipment manufacturers can offer information about drop-in solutions, though they are relatively rare, especially as oil has changed over the years. When you drop in refrigerant, you don’t have to change O-rings, Schrader cores, or other components. Drop-ins are NOT necessarily like-for-like when it comes to charging.  “Retrofit” is a relatively broad term that refers to any type of refrigerant change. The retrofitting practices that may have worked for A1 CFC systems to A1 HCFC systems will NOT work for A1 to A2L refrigerants. We need new installations for flammable refrigerant systems.   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Trevor Matthews, the founder of Refrigeration Mentor, is back on the podcast. This time, he and Bryan talk about the value of networking for HVAC techs as the conference season comes to a close. Many trade events are networking opportunities that allow you to build relationships with other tradespeople, educators, mentors, and even other companies. You can also learn many trade and business tools that help you as a technician. Many technical and business conversations occur at trade events, and there is a lot to learn from those, whether you’re directly involved or just listening. It can also be useful to sit in on classes or presentations about topics that you don’t directly deal with, such as building science. Networking also has value for technicians because it can provide several means of personal development. Making connections with potential mentors can open the doors to new career opportunities, even in places where you wouldn’t have expected yourself to work.  If you see someone you want to talk to at an event, feel free to go up and talk to them. Trade events are places where people expect to get to know one another, so many of the people who attend them genuinely want to talk to others in the trade. People like Trevor are happy to share their knowledge and help you develop yourself as a technician. You can also send people emails introducing yourself to them before the event if you’re a bit introverted and uncomfortable putting yourself out there. Trevor and Bryan also discuss: Being isolated in a “bubble” Choosing to work or visit conferences Networking to avoid getting stuck Planning trips around trade conferences  The 2023 HVACR Training Symposium Specialized conferences Refrigeration Mentor   Learn more about Trevor’s work at https://refrigerationmentor.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
David Richardson of NCI joins the HVAC School podcast to talk about how we can implement educational growth effectively throughout the trade. NCI started as a premium training resource about airflow testing, but the organization eventually started teaching about combustion testing as well. When we improve the industry, we need to be able to have concrete ways to see what we’ve been doing wrong or what we can do better. Test instruments allow us to see the whats and whys behind what we do. Education needs to be focused on bringing those test instruments into training AND teaching others how to use them properly.  Once we find a way to understand the invisible aspects of what we do, we can get into systems thinking and grasp the more abstract concepts much more easily. When people are introduced to concepts in a logical sequence, they can build their knowledge on what affects the system and why it does do.   When we tie everything together, including using solid data, testing in and testing out, and using sources to help you interpret data, we can implement educational growth more effectively. Most of all, we can learn how to translate the technical into practical, which helps us communicate with the customers in ways that matter. However, the most important thing about test instrumentation and applying it to learning is understanding why you are doing those tests or why you want to do them. David and Bryan also discuss: The purpose of traverse tests The mechanics of NCI’s teaching (PATH to performance) To charge or not to charge for combustion analysis What NCI does and how to get involved with NCI   Learn more about NCI or get involved with their training at https://nationalcomfortinstitute.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Corbett Lunsford of Home Diagnosis joins Kaleb to record a podcast about comfort investigation on TV. The two of them discuss how comfort investigation works on TV shows, what Home Diagnosis hopes to accomplish, and some building performance tips. Home Diagnosis is mostly aimed at homeowners, but HVAC technicians would also benefit from the show, as it dives into science and testing. The show promotes consumer education and contractor accountability. Diagnostics and testing are absolute MUSTS for providing the best possible solutions and transforming your business. You put yourself in another league when you take measurements and have the data to create tailored solutions. In other words, you can’t manage what you can’t measure, and if you’re not testing, you’re guessing. The current paradigm shift in the industry has to do with custom designs. Physics, chemistry, and microbiology are all important facets of applied science to consider when coming up with a custom solution. Many buildings have distinct microbiological profiles, including bakeries with yeast or cheese production or aging facilities. Natural events and human activity can change these buildings’ microbiological profiles. Ventilation is part of the equation of home performance, and it’s a pretty delicate one that HVAC techs can control. When it comes to ventilation, we would be wise to avoid selling products we don’t understand. Ventilation solutions may also be appropriate for one structure but inappropriate for another, so we need to think about the applications of these solutions. Corbett and Kaleb also discuss: Comfort vs. efficiency vs. control ERVs vs. HRVs and humidity How the market influences custom solutions Preview of challenges in Season 3 of Home Diagnosis Microbiology of structures   Learn more about Home Diagnosis at https://homediagnosis.tv/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Blake Standen and Omar Tabba of BrainBox AI join the HVAC School podcast to talk about commercial HVAC predictive control. This conversation focuses on applying artificial intelligence to existing building systems, including the HVAC, to predict performance under certain weather and occupancy conditions. If you have controls that can predict performance and adapt, then you can maximize energy savings. A commercial HVAC system may include air handlers, chillers, boilers, RTUs, and all sorts of energy-consuming technologies. These systems also have controls that help direct the infrastructure, and artificial intelligence can help optimize the controls, make performance predictions based on forecast data, and make those controls communicate with foreign controls from other companies (such as via BACnet).  BrainBox AI uses a cloud to collect and hold the data it needs to predict what a building will do and help control the infrastructure. Controls react to errors, and the goal of BrainBox AI is to predict errors before they happen. For example, AI can help solve short cycling under certain weather conditions. However, buildings that use pneumatics rather than digital controls and older systems may not be good candidates for AI solutions. One of AI’s challenges is that it requires multiple layers of training: you’re training the controls engineers, facilities staff, AND the AI itself. Another challenge of AI is that people don’t fully understand that it’s not the type of automation that takes people’s jobs; we can minimize those perceptions with education.  Blake, Omar, and Bryan also discuss: Machine learning vs. artificial intelligence Accuracy of prediction models Virtual testing environments Apathy as a challenge What happens when controls go offline or are adjusted? Tethered services Application programming interface (API) Controlling comfort and energy consumption vs. greenhouse gas emissions BrainBox’s global partnership with ABB   Learn more at https://www.brainboxai.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Chris Micallef, the CEO of Falkonair, joins Nathan Orr at AHR to discuss energy savings for three-phase equipment. They also explore some of Falkonair’s controls for compressors, especially on DC inverter equipment. Falkonair has software that allows users to control all types and brands of three-phase compressors with compatible variable frequency drives (VFDs). The software recommends the compatible VFD based on the amperage readings. Falkonair aims to bring this software to the refrigeration industry and then move on to HVAC contractors and data centers. The control unit adjusts the compressor speed to respond to changes in refrigerant charge levels (based on discharge temperature). These controls protect the compressor and maintain efficiency, even under less than ideal operating conditions. Energy efficiency can increase by 35% with Falkonair’s control units in place. You can expect longer runtimes, a reduction in short cycles, and a reduction in humidity. If the refrigerant loss is too great, then the control can also shut down the compressor. However, it should take less time for a facility manager to notice that refrigerant loss is happening. The controls use temperature probes, so they don’t cut into the refrigeration circuit. Although VFDs are good for reducing vibrational wear and tear, we have to be aware of potential issues with harmonics. Harmonics can damage the bearings, especially on pumps that don’t have oil constantly lubricating the bearings. Chris and Nathan also discuss: VFD sizing considerations How Falkonair’s AI works with hot gas bypass  Software commissioning Oil return sequences on DC inverter systems Hertz ranges and limitations per compressor type How Falkonair’s control units can exceed 35% efficiency gains   Learn more about Falkonair at https://falkonair.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Brynn Cooksey joined Eric Kaiser for a podcast about internal apprenticeship, its benefits, and how to make it work. Brynn is the general manager of Air Doctors Heating and Cooling LLC, a well-respected HVAC contracting company in Detroit, MI. Air Doctors Heating and Cooling LLC has its own in-house apprenticeship program based on Department of Labor guidelines. The apprenticeship program caters to new techs out of trade school and focuses on rigorous training. There is some administrative paperwork, but there are no additional administrative expenses. The only expenses of the apprenticeship program come from training and wages. Most of the administrative work comes from recordkeeping. Bumps in pay come with milestones, and RSES certification is available at the highest level of Brynn’s program. Once techs receive their RSES CM, they become official journeymen and continue to learn more about the trade through incentivized training.  The technicians at Air Doctors seem to like the training program. The program is very structured when it comes to training, hours, and pay, so the techs like predictability. Reduced callback rates are positive effects of the apprenticeship program; Brynn’s current callback rate is less than 1% (was 3% before the program was put into place). The apprenticeship program is easy to set up with the government, and it makes companies eligible for national and local grants. Approved apprenticeship programs can also take advantage of other benefits, including labor scouting to grow the workforce. Everything about the apprenticeship program recognition process was free. Many businesses can take advantage of these programs to grow their workforce and train promising technicians who can transform the business.   Email Brynn for more information at brynn.cooksey@airdoctorshvacservice.com   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Alex and Nicole of Faraday join Kaleb Saleeby and Ty Branaman to talk about new educational formats and options in the HVAC industry. Alex is the founder of Faraday, and Nicole is the head of operations. Ty is a notable HVAC educator who supports Faraday and its mission. Faraday is a free educational program that prepares apprenticeships for fieldwork, allows them to get EPA 608 certification, and helps place them in jobs with paid training. Although the program is free, there is a rigorous selection process to make sure only the most serious candidates join the program. The human aspect is very important to training, and Ty is one of the people who brings that to education programs. HVAC training is multifaceted, and the appliances are just the beginning. Training focuses on science and math as well as craftsmanship, which isn’t what a lot of people think about when they think of HVAC. Faraday focuses on bringing the abstract and artistic concepts of the trade to training. However, Faraday also acknowledges just how important skills are to a person’s career and life in general. Faraday also has live sessions with guest speakers, and these are available to current students and alumni. Lifelong learning and investment are important to Faraday, and the programs create a support system for students even after completion. Alex, Nicole, Ty, and Kaleb also discuss: Faraday’s admissions process Ty’s contributions to education and the industry Bringing the Masterclass format and delivery to HVAC The ambitions, interests, and fears of young people Costs of training Using Discord for communication and training Teaching life skills Faraday’s vetting, coaching, and weed-out processes Producing coachable, well-rounded individuals   If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Ashley (aka hvac_ash) joins the podcast to talk about how HVAC fits into social media, AHR 2022, and AmRad capacitors. Ashley works with Global the Source on the sales and distribution side of the business. Becoming an HVAC influencer is smart, especially when there is a dedicated audience in the industry. When you gain traction online, that can branch into marketing, which helps get the word out even more. It’s also a great way to make connections organically once you have traction and learn from others’ industry-related content. Ashley also has firsthand experience with the HVAC trade’s obstacles for women. She believes that making groups like Women in HVACR more marketable and focusing on recruiting young women will help break those barriers down. There needs to be more effort to the recruiting process than just posting ads and job postings on social media. Global the Source is a distributor of AmRad products, including the well-known American-made capacitors and Turbo line of start capacitors (Turbolytic) and hard start kits (TES5). The quality of the AmRad capacitors’ foil and the oil has been tested widely, even on the HVAC School YouTube channel; the conclusion is that AmRad capacitors are made of high-quality materials and last longer than many others. Ashley and Bryan also discuss: What it means to be a master distributor Being an HVAC influencer on Instagram Visiting AHR as an influencer and sales professional Strategic recruiting for underrepresented demographics AmRad’s Turbo product family New AmRad products for failed run capacitors and stuck relays   Follow Ashley on Instagram (hvac_ash) and DM her with questions or email her at ashleyl@globalthesource.com. Learn more about Global the Source and some of the AmRad products at https://globalthesource.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Bill Spohn joins Eric Kaiser and Kaleb Saleeby at AHR 2022 to talk about his experiences designing and living in a home with NetZero HVAC.  NetZero HVAC refers to system design with tight coordination with the house to make it as efficient as possible. Some of these systems are so tight and efficient that they approach passive house standards (0.6 ACH50). Bill lives in a modular home that also generates more energy than it consumes, and it doesn’t rely on natural gas. The greatest expenses of Bill’s NetZero home came from all the custom factors, as it didn’t make sense to price many of the features on a square-foot basis. The heating and cooling system is also unique, as it is completely separate from the ventilation system, which is a Build Equinox CERV. On the IAQ side, the CERV monitors outdoor temperature and humidity, indoor CO2, and indoor VOCs. Bill also has a HAVEN central air monitor inside the CERV system as a backup. Bill’s HVAC system is an air-source heat pump that provides two tons of heating and cooling and has low-temperature capabilities. The two-ton unit works for a 4400-square-foot home. Bill, Eric, and Kaleb also discuss: Energy independence Controlling radiant heat gains and window construction Construction and material fabrication Monitoring energy usage Energy recovery ventilation (ERVs) Thermal bridging at work in Bill’s walls Knowledgeable customers Jim Bergmann’s help with troubleshooting Radon issues Bill’s podcast Solar inverters Measuring tool accuracy   You can learn more by listening to Bill's podcast, Building HVAC Science. You can subscribe to the podcast on any podcast app of your choice or get an overview at https://buildinghvacscience.libsyn.com/. You can also check out Bill’s blog at https://spohnhome.com/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Collin Olson, the staff physicist of The Energy Conservatory (TEC), joins Eric Kaiser at AHR 2022 to talk a bit about data logging. Data logging refers to the act of using sensors to record data over time and then analyzing that data. TEC dipped its toes into data logging with the APT and then TECLOG. Data logging allows us to take and store multiple readings as well as extrapolate data into graphs, making it easier to analyze performance. The TECLOG4 software is the most up-to-date version. TECLOG is a simple software to use with basic training. The understanding of building science continues over a lifetime, but the actual software can be learned in approximately 30 minutes. TECLOG is free with TEC’s hardware, such as the DG-1000. To get started, all you need is a precision manometer and a computer. However, it’s worth nothing that the DG-1000 stores a lot of data, meaning that you can launch data logging sessions on the gauge without your computer. Some of the most important measurements are related to drafts and backdrafting. There are 250 Pascals in an inch of water column, and the DG-1000 can pick up very small changes in the Pascals and can indicate when depressurization happens and when it poses a risk. Improperly installed vents can also produce alarming drafting conditions due to air density; data logging can pick up that sort of information. Collin and Eric also discuss: The history of TEC’s APT Wind and its effect on building pressures Event markers and hotkeys The link between depressurization, flue gases, and weather conditions Managing multiple blower doors at a time   Check out TEC’s software, including TECLOG4, at https://energyconservatory.com/downloads/.  If you have an iPhone, subscribe to the podcast HERE, and if you have an Android phone, subscribe HERE. Check out our handy calculators HERE.
Comments (47)

Bennett Gulstrom

Great episode! Being homeschooled K-12 myself, this struck a cord with me. The type of skills that Brian talks about are the types of skills my parents instilled into me. Because of this I have never been out of work. Whether all of it was W-2 work is another topic. Share this around. SKILLED labor is dying but we can breath new life into it!

Jul 3rd
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Steven Doane

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Jun 26th
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Ethan Charles

what channel does Craig have?

Feb 9th
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Brad Clemons

wish they do live shows agian always was a great Saturday night

Jan 17th
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Ethan Charles

sure would have liked to hear what Caleb thought at some point.

Oct 28th
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Ray Ruiz

good one

Oct 16th
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Moein

Thanks it was really helpful.

Sep 14th
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Brad Schlabach

Rational for storage... reduced capital capacity of equipment is okay, but moving electrical use time to off peak times is HUGE! Currently FPL, in our area, offers off peak electric at $0.06/kW-hr, which is half the current rate. Challenge is you then agree to $0.24/kW-hr for on peak usage.

Apr 11th
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Brad Schlabach

Yes! Also, let’s think about using over sized piping instead of buffer tanks to house the heat/cooling capacity, this would reduce energy consumption that is normally found in pipe friction loss. Also, consider that your cold storage be a tank of ice.

Apr 11th
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Dave Johnsonnola

screw "marketing", ..... show us what works.

Apr 2nd
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dan ennis

For a further fuel advantage create an account with GetUpside and use code DAN47955 to get cash back on your purchases when available.

Mar 9th
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ID17373688

One thing about analog vs digital gauges is the flutter you can see on an analog gauge refrigerant boiling off like flash gas when charging a system I’m young but it’s a tip from old timer refrigeration technician you can’t see that on digital gauges

Feb 10th
Reply (1)

ID17373688

One thing about analog vs digital gauges is the flutter you can see on an analog gauge refrigerant boiling off like flash gas when charging a system I’m young but it’s a tip from old timer refrigeration technician you can’t see that on digital gauges

Feb 10th
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Ray Ruiz

Good as always

Feb 7th
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Randall Witt

I am in aHVAC school right now and i enjoy some of the extra course like physics they make me take to understand wnats going on on a deeper level

Jan 27th
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Ken Casebier

yet again great advice, thank you Bryan

Jan 14th
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Doug Marsh

For checking input the Dormont FloPro is the product I had mentioned. FPMD75FFKIT is the part number.

Dec 20th
Reply (1)

Steve Domansky

Bryan lives in a world of “ “air quotes . Haha

Dec 8th
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Larry Green

What do you have on heat pump TXV diagnostics?

Dec 1st
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Brendan McCloskey

Bryan , as a soon to be tech leaving trade school, I listened to this podcast from the beginning. I can’t say how much I’ve gotten out of this podcast and love what your doing, you break things down for us newbies and explain why somethings someway and not that way because “it always has been that way”. Very impressed and thankful! Thank you !

Nov 22nd
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