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Heat Rocks

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Scorching guests and sizzling records: join music writer Oliver Wang and music supervisor Morgan Rhodes each week as they invite their favorite artists, critics and scholars for in-depth conversations about the albums that shape our lives. Each week our special guests will take you deep into their heat rocks from the world of hip-hop, soul, dance, jazz, funk and more. Get with us!
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The Album: D'Angelo Voodoo (2000) Tall Black Guy, AKA Terrel Wallace, has been making beats and remixing artists like 79.5, Stro Elliot, and Moonchild, for a long time. Listen to any one of his songs and you'll understand why he's one of the best producers out there and why we were so excited to talk to him. It's no surprise that his personal heat rock (and ours) was "Voodoo" by D'Angelo. Making the album was no small feat. D'Angelo took a long break between albums to learn more about playing the guitar, and linked up with the Soulquarians to lay down some of the funkiest, most eclectic, and just plain hottest tracks of all-time. It took nearly 5 years to make, but the wait was worth it. Morgan is flying solo and talked to TBG about the wide range of D'Angelo's influences, the shift from "Brown Sugar" to "Voodoo," and D'Angelo's personal shift from neo soul darling to full-on sex symbol. More on Tall Black Guy Tall Black Guy on Bastard Jazz Hyp 203: Tall Black Guy Twitter | Soundcloud More on Voodoo Voodoo - Review (Pitchfork) D'Angelo and Questlove Bare the Roots of "Voodoo"" (NPR) Show Tracklisting (all songs from Voodoo unless indicated otherwise): Send It On Tall Black Guy: O Fim da Viagem Playa Playa Snoop Dogg: Gin and Juice Chicken Grease Feel Like Makin' Love Spanish Joint The Line One Mo'Gin Spanish Joint Greatdayndamornin'/Booty - Medley Left and Right Red Astaire: Follow Me Untitled (How Does It Feel) Prince: She's Always In My Hair D'Angelo: She's Always In My Hair 14KT: She's Always In My Hair Africa Send It On Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
It's easy to think of Nat King Cole as "that Christmas song guy" but his musical output is truly astounding, recording hundreds of songs with over a hundred of them becoming hits on the pop charts. The Complete Capitol Recordings of the Nat King Cole Trio is by far the largest album we've ever discussed on Heat Rocks and we couldn't have asked for better guests to come break it down with us.   Nate Sloan and Charlie Harding of the Switched on Pop podcast sit down with us to talk about this enormous anthology, the timbre of Cole's voice, and the ubiquity of the AABA song structure. Stay tuned to the very end for a special Heat Rocks theme song workshop. More on Switched on Pop Get Charlie and Nate's book! Check out the Switched on Pop podcast Nate's Twitter | Charlie's Twitter More on Nat King Cole Nat King Cole: An Incandescent Voice (NPR) Della Reese on Nat King Cole Show Tracklisting (all songs from The Complete Capitol Recordings unless otherwise indicated): All for You John Pizzarelli: The Best Man The Best Man (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons An Old Piano Plays the Blues I'm In The Mood For Love Sweet Lorraine Embraceable You (1943 version) Embraceable You (1961 version) I've Got A Way With Women Jonas Brothers: Sucker Prelude in C Sharp Minor The Christmas Song (Merry Christmas to You) Nature Boy Ahmed Sirour: Nature Boy Can You Look Me In The Eyes (And Say We're Through) I'm An Errand Boy for Rhythm The Frim Fram Sauce  Embraceable You (1961 version) Nat King Cole: Almost Like Being in Love Kendrick Lamar: Thanksgiving An Old Piano Plays the Blues John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman: My One and Only Love Brook Benton: Mother Nature, Father Time Speedy West: Speedin' West Slim & Slam: Jump Session Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
We here at Heat Rocks talk a lot about Prince, and this marks the FIFTH episode where we're discussing an album of his. Around in the World in a Day incorporated more psychedelia and a wider variety of instruments, which made for a much more eclectic and unconventional album. This is also Morgan's favorite episode, so we couldn't be more excited to talk about this magnificent album. Wendy & Lisa of the Revolution come down to the studio to talk about creating this record with Prince, the funkiness of the record, and what life was like working alongside his purpleness for all those years.  This is a very special episode you definitely do not want to miss. More on Wendy & Lisa Wendy and Lisa on Prince (Esquire) Website | Twitter More on Around the World in a Day Prince's First Ever TV Interview (MTV) Prince: In appreciation of a virtuoso, enduring genius (The Independent) Show Tracklisting (all songs from Around the World in a Day unless otherwise indicated): Raspberry Beret Around the World in a Day Prince: Annie Christian America Pop Life Paisley Park Raspberry Beret Condition of the Heart The Ladder Tamborine America Raspberry Beret Around the World in a Day Paisley Park Condition of the Heart Prince: Uptown Wendy & Lisa: I Will The Family: Screams of Passion  Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
Our Heat Rocks of the 2010s

Our Heat Rocks of the 2010s

2020-01-0200:57:29

Oliver's albums Erykah Badu's New Amerykah Part Two (Return of the Ankh) (2010) Laura Mvula's Sing to the Moon (2013) Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp A Butterfly (2015) Frank Ocean's Blonde (2016) Tyler, The Creator's Flower Boy (2017) Morgan's albums Thundercat's The Golden Age of the Apocalypse (2011) Robert Glasper Experiment's Black Radio (2012) Beyoncé's Beyoncé (2013) D'Angelo's Black Messiah (2014) Kamasi Washington's The Epic (2015) Oliver and Morgan are kicking off the new decade and talking about their favorite albums from the 2010s. They discuss their own personal journeys through the decade and the changes in the music industry in general.  Happy new year, Heat Rockers. Hope you all have a great one! Show Tracklisting: Erykah Badu: Fall in Love (Your Funeral) Tyler, the Creator: See You Again Robert Glasper Experiment: Ah Yeah Kendrick Lamar: Momma Beyoncé: Drunk in Love Frank Ocean: Nights Erykah Badu: Love Erykah Badu: Out My Mind, Just In Time Erykah Badu: 20 Feet Tall Laura Mvula: Like the Morning Dew Laura Mvula: Father Father Laura Mvula: She Kendrick Lamar: Alright Kendrick Lamar: Wesley's Theory Kendrick Lamar: Complexion (A Zulu Love) Kendrick Lamar: For Sale? - Interlude Frank Ocean: Pink + White Frank Ocean: Godspeed Frank Ocean: Self Control Tyler, the Creator: Glitter Tyler, the Creator: See You Again Thundercat: Daylight Thundercat: Walkin' Robert Glasper Experiment: Cherish the Day Robert Glasper: Portrait of an Angel Robert Glasper Experiment: Move Love Robert Glasper Experiment: Black Radio Beyoncé: Haunted Beyoncé: Drunk in Love Beyoncé: Partition D'Angelo: Really Love D'Angelo: 1000 Deaths Kamasi Washington: The Message Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
The Albums: Vince Guraldi's A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) Andy Williams' The Andy Williams Christmas Album (1963) Stax Records' Christmas in Soulsville (2007) Heat Rocks was hyped to have film critic Alonso Duralde (The Wrap), one of the hosts of Maximum Fun's movie podcast Who Shot Ya? guest with us to talk about our favorite Christmas songs, holiday fare, songs that should play when it's cold outside, baby. We visit the canon of Christmas music over the years (Andy Williams 1963 The Christmas Album, Vince Guaraldi Trio's A Charlie Brown Christmas and Stax Record's 2007 compilation Christmas In Soulsville and across genres and styles - crooners, sweeping orchestral cinematic pieces, summer songs vs. winter songs, modern Christmas traditions, etc. Alonso broke down the power of nostalgia as it relates to Christmas music and how our tastes in music are informed by tradition. Don't be a grinch. Listen to this wintery wonderland of an episode about favorite Christmas tracks. More on Alonso Duralde Alonso's podcast, Linoleum Knife Alonso on Maximum Fun Twitter Show Tracklisting Andy Williams: The Christmas Song The Waitresses: Christmas Wrapping The Shins: Wonderful Christmastime Tracey Thorn: Snow Yogi Yorgesson: I Yust Go Nuts At Christmas Boyz II Men: Let It Snow Band-Aid: Do They Know It's Christmas Andy Williams: O Holy Night Andy Williams: Kay Thompson's Jingle Bells Andy Williams: It'as The Most Wonderful Time of the Year Andy Williams: Sweet Little Jesus Boy Andy Williams: White Christmas Vince Guraldi Trio: Christmas Time is Here (Vocal) Vince Guraldi Trio: Christmas Time is Here (Instrumental) Vince Guraldi Trio: My Little Drum Vince Guraldi Trio: What Child Is This Vince Guraldi Trio:Skating Vince Guraldi Trio: Hark, The Herald Angels Ring Otis Redding: Merry Christmas Baby take 1 The Staple Singers: Who Took The Merry Out of Christmas Albert King: Santa Claus Wants Some Loving The Emotions: Black Christmas Isaac Hayes: The Mistletoe and Me Booker T and the M.G.'s: Winter Wonderland take 2 Nate Dogg: Santa Claus Goes Straight to the Ghetto Little Johnny Taylor: Please Come Home For Christmas Juice Crew: Cold Chillin' Christmas The Free Design: Close Your Mouth (It's Christmas) Kenny Bobien: O Come Let Us Adore Him Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
2016 was a hard year, to say the least. We lost Prince, David Bowie, Phife Dawg, Sharon Jones, and many others that year. And on top of that, we here in the US had to reckon with the results of the presidential election. On November 11th 2016, A Tribe Called Quest dropped their final album, We Got It From Here...Thank You 4 Your Service, with verses from Phife himself. It came at a time we needed Tribe the most. It went Gold and was widely regarded as one of the best albums of the year. Comedian Cristela Alonzo sat down with us to talk about We Got It From Here and why it quite literally changed the course of her life. We talk about the use of samples and how Tribe was able to update their sound for a modern audience without compromising the mission statement and production style that made them famous all those years ago. More on Cristela Alonzo Cristela's new book Music to My Years is out now Laughing in Color: Cristela Alonzo on Finding Her Voice Through Comedy (WNYC) Twitter | Instagram More on We Got It From Here...Thank You 4 Your Service Oliver's review of the album for NPR A Tribe Called Quest's Soundtrack to the Resistance (The Village Voice) Life Goes On With A Tribe Called Quest (The AV Club) Show Tracklisting (All songs from We Got It From Here...Thank You 4 Your Service unless otherwise indicated): The Donald The Space Program We The People... Curtis Mayfield: We The People Who Are Darker Than Blue Dis Generation Kids... Elton John: Bennie and the Jets Solid Wall of Sound Nairobi Sisters: Promised Land Whateva Will Be Dis Generation Conrad Tokyo We The People Black Spasmodic Melatonin Lost Somebody Conrad Tokyo J Dilla: U-Love Gang Starr: Bad Name 2pac: Changes Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
What's Going On? On May 21, 1971, Marvin Gaye released his eleventh studio album asking this simple question. It was a risky move, for sure. Gaye was at the height of his career and this new album was heavy, focusing on things affecting his community like drug abuse, poverty, injustice and the Vietnam War. People might not have been expecting this, but it was what he wanted to make. Fortunately, the gamble paid off. What's Going On went on to sell over two million copies and is widely regarded as one of the greatest albums of all time, and it's not hard to see why. It's a timeless record, as true back in 1971 as it is now.  Father Amde of The Watts Prophets sits down with Morgan to talk about why this album was so groundbreaking, how he got to know Marvin Gaye when he was was still with us, and what Marvin might be talking about if her were here now. More on The Watts Prophets "Watts Poetic" (TheLAand Magazine) Biography on The Watts Prophets (Hip Hop Scriptures) Website More on What's Going On The Story of Marvin Gaye's 'What's Going On' (NPR) Marvin Gaye's 1971 "What's Going On?" remains unanswered today (The Conversation) Show Tracklisting (All songs from What's Going On unless indicated otherwise): Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) Flyin' High (In The Friendly Sky) What's Happening Brother What's Going On Watts Prophets: Pain BB King: Every Day I Have the Blues Marvin Gaye: Soldier's Plea Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler) Save the Children Curtis Mayfield: We Got To Have Peace Save The Children Wholy Holy Flyin' High (In The Friendly Sky) James Brown: King Heroin Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology) What's Going On Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
We've talked a ton of gospel here on Heat Rocks, but this episode marks the first time we've discussed a full gospel album on the show, and from none other than one of the very first gospel quartets, The Sensational Nightingales.  The group was formed in 1942 as simply The Nightingales, but it wasn't until 1946 and the introduction of the sensational singer Julius Cheeks when the band really began to hit their stride. The quartet still tours to this day, albeit with a slightly different lineup, but the soul and tradition of Southern black gospel music is alive and well.   Singer/songwriter Van Hunt joins us in the studio to talk about his personal connection to gospel music, the influence of the Sensational Nightingales, and how artists can make the move from gospel to secular music. More on Van Hunt The re-imagined first album, TRIM Seconds of Pleasure (Live at WFUV) Website | Twitter More on The Sensational Nightingales The group's take on the gospel classic Hold On Profile by the National Museum of African American Music Show Tracklisting (All songs from It's Gonna Rain Again unless indicated otherwise): The Last Mile Dionne Farris: Hopeless Van Hunt: Seconds of Pleasure Hold to God's Hand At the Meeting A Heart Like Thine Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers: Be With Me Jesus (Live) Van Hunt: Hello, Goodbye Anthony Hamilton and the Hamiltones: Hotline Bling DeWayne Crocker Jr, Kelontae Gavin, Keyla Richardson, and Mikel Simmons: Hold On At the Meeting The Old Account Carlton Pierson: Old School Medley It's Gonna Rain Again At Calvary A Heart Like Thine Sly Stone: Walking in Jesus Name It's Gonna Rain Again The Davis Sisters: Twelve Gates to the City Silvergate Quartet: I'm Going Down in Jesus Name The Daytonians: Let Jesus Work it Out Dr Charles Hayes and Cosmopolitan Church of Prayer Choir: Jesus Can Work it Out Karizma: Work it Out Sam Cooke & The Soul Stirrers: Jesus Gave Me Water Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
This episode originally ran 07/26/2018 The Album: Boyz II Men: II (1994) Phil Yu is better known to most as Angry Asian Man...except that he isn't actually all that angry (though he is Asian and a man). Phil started his titular site nearly 20 years ago and since then, it has become an indispensable news resource about Asian American culture, politics and related issues. Phil, along with Jeff Yang, also hosts his own Asian American culture podcast, They Call Us Bruce. Phil wanted to revisit one of the big hit albums of his youth: II by Boyz II Men. By '94, the group was already one of the biggest acts in all of R&B and expectations were beyond high for the follow-up. The quartet of crooners from Philly didn't disappoint as II continued the group's reign at the top, especially thanks to smooth ballads like "Water Runs Dry," "On Bended Knee" and of course, "I'll Make Love To You." (The three of us couldn't stop laughing when we were discussing the majesty that was the video for that single. Shout out to sexy finger wags.) More on Phil Yu Interview with KoreAm Magazine. "Becoming Angry Asian Man" (Profile on NBC Asian America) They Call Us Bruce podcast Website | Twitter More on II "Boyz II Men at the Head of the Class" (New York Times, 1994) "Boyz II Men Talk Incredible 1994 Run" (Billboard, 2014) Show Tracklisting (all songs from II unless indicated otherwise): Thank You I'll Make Love To You Damar Jackson: No Protection Thank You Boyz II Men: End of the Road I Sit Away LL Cool J: Hey Lover Khalil - Interlude Yesterday Water Runs Dry On Bended Knee I'll Make Love To You On Bended Knee Boyz II Men: A Song For Mama Jezzebel Jazmine Sullivan: Round Midnight Water Runs Dry If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
“Don’t talk, just listen.” Jodeci announced themselves to the world on their 1991 debut album, Forever My Lady. They didn’t invent new jack swing but few R&B groups so seamlessly melded the bravado of hip-hop style with soulful pipes that could melt hearts and quicken pulses. Backed by the musical mentorship of Al B. Sure and A&R-ed by a young Uptown intern named Sean “Puffy” Combs, Jodeci all but heralded the end of ‘80s quiet storm respectability and stepped left of the youthful innocence of early New Edition and even the genteel charm of their contemporaries, Boyz II Men. K-Ci, JoJo, Mr. Dalvin and DeVanté Swing were the self-proclaimed “bad boys of R&B” and they wore that attitude on their sleeve and in their songs.   Forever My Lady was the pick of our guest, UCLA professor, Dr. Shana Redmond who studies popular music, race and politics. Her first book, from 2014, was Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora and she’s currently working on two new books including Everything Man about the life and legacy of singer, actor and activist Paul Robeson. She discovered Jodeci at the precocious age of 11 and along with Morgan and Oliver, they discussed how Jodeci cut a different path into R&B of the era, whether the album’s ballads or dance jams aged better, and whether or not Jodeci covering the ‘60s pop group, The Association, was a wise decision or not.    More on Shana Redmond Interview on Left of Black with Mark Anthony Neal How Do You Like It? podcast episode alongside Evelyn McDonnell and Alice Bag Website | Twitter More on Forever My Lady “Jodeci “Forever My Lady”: A 25th Anniversary Retrospective” (Dart Adams) “How Jodeci’s ‘Forever My Lady’ Influenced Generations of Male Singers” (The Boombox) “Jodeci’s Forever My Lady Was Revolutionary for Me, a Church Boy From Okla.” (The Root) Show Tracklisting (all songs from Forever My Lady unless indicated otherwise): Forever My Lady Stay Pebbles: Love Makes Things Happen MC Hammer: Addams Groove Come and Talk to Me 112: Cupid It's Alright Interlude (553 - Nasty) Stay U and I Come And Talk To Me Jodeci: Feenin (Remix) The Association: Cherish Cherish X's We Share Forever My Lady   Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
Saul Williams is super talented.  The multi-hyphenate artist not only has a way with words, he has an ear for heat rocks.  And apparently kept a fire starting five in his CD changer.  We were fortunate enough to have him bring his ear and words to the booth to discuss Portishead's debut album "Dummy" on Heat Rocks. Brooklyn meets Bristol in Atlanta, at a time when Saul was discovering global sounds, immersing himself in culture and scholarship - in other words, he and the album were both in the right place at the right time. We spoke about Beth Ortons haunting vocals, the rise of the trip hop genre, sampling as an aesthetic, lyrical ingenuity and why Atlanta’s club scene was unmatched in the 90s.   More on Saul Williams Saul's Tiny Desk Concert Saul's new album, Encrypted & Vulnerable Website | Twitter More on Dummy Pitchfork's review of Portishead Portishead's Dummy is 25. The Band Asks That You Play it Loud (The New York Times) Portishead's first TV appearance Show Tracklisting (all songs from Dummy unless indicated otherwise): Sour Times Saul Williams: Fight Everything Mysterons Gang Starr: No Shame In My Game Young Disciples: As We Come (To Be) Cleveland Watkiss: Project 23 Omar: Need You Bad Mysterons Numb Glory Box Tricky: Hell is Round the Corner Glory Box It Could Be Sweet Sade: No Ordinary Love It Could Be Sweet Sour Times Lalo Schifrim: Danube Incident Isaac Hayes: Ike's Rap II Glory Box Strangers It's A Fire Pedestal It Could Be Sweet Esthero: Superheroes Isaac Hayes: Walk On By Nearly God: Poems Goldie: Mother Soho: Hot Music Fela Kuti: Lady   Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
The Emotions started out singing gospel as The Hutchinson Sunbeams, but when they signed a deal with Stax/Volt, they changed their name and switched to soul/R&B. They enjoyed modest success during those years, charting on the Hot 100, but Stax was going bankrupt, and The Emotions were left stranded.  The group moved to Columbia Records and met Maurice White, who helped produce the biggest hits in their careers. "The Best of My Love" rocketed up the charts and reached the top spot on Billboard Pop and R&B and their album Rejoice went Platinum.  Critic and professor Tisa Bryant talks to Oliver and guest co-host Ernest Hardy about the change in sound between the Stax/Volt and Columbia Records years, the role Maurice and Charles Stepney played in the production of this album, and The Emotions' place in the vast world of girl groups.   More on Tisa Tisa's book, Unexplained Presence The Hybridized Writings of Tisa Bryant (KCET) Twitter More on The Emotions The Emotions on Stax Records Wattstax trailer An 'Emotional' Success Story (The New York Times) Show Tracklisting (all songs from Rejoice unless indicated otherwise): Best of My Love The Emotions: Peace Be Still The Emotions: Flowers A Long Way to Go Bebe and Cece Winans: Heaven Blessed Deniece Williams: Free Blessed Key to My Heart Don't Ask My Neighbors A Feeling Is Best of My Love Don't Ask My Neighbors Best of My Love Don't Ask My Neighbors A Long Way to Go Rejoice The Emotions: Blind Alley The Emotions: Show Me How The Emotions: Peace Be Still (Live at Wattstax) The Emotions: We Go Through Changes Love Unlimited: If You Want Me, Say It Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
Album: Herbie Hancock: Thrust (1974)   Thrust followed on the heels of Herbie Hancock’s genre-altering best-seller Head Hunters album, one in which the gifted keyboardist and composer played with new conceptions of fusion jazz and synthesizer technology. Thrust, in many ways, could be considered a second half to Head Hunters; recorded within months of its predecessors with almost all the same players. Once again, Hancock and his team plumbed the possibilities of mixing funk rhythms with jazz improvisation, resulting in four tracks of fusion fire that, to our guest Jason Concepcion, marked a high point before a onslaught of “smooth jazz” would dial everything down.    Concepcion is perhaps best known to people as a basketball savant as a staff writer for The Ringer and Emmy-winning producer behind their NBA Desktop segment. I first discovered him via Twitter, thanks to his expert, witty writing as @netw3rk. However, for all his sports acumen, Concepcion is also Berkelee School-trained, having once attended there with the ambition of going into film composition. Thrust was a revelatory way in which he engaged with the possibilities of jazz, soul and funk experimentations. During our conversation, we discussed Hancock’s penchant for innovation in that era, the highs and lows of 1970s fusion jazz plus we took a side trip into the current state of the 365 day NBA “season.”   More on Jason Concepcion Ringer archive Jason on what Whiplash got right and wrong about music school (Grantland) Twitter | Instagram More on Thrust Album liner notes collection LP review (Sputnik Music) Show Tracklisting (all songs from Thrust unless indicated otherwise): Palm Grease Spank-A-Lee Butterfly Actual Proof Van Halen: Cathedral Spank-A-Lee Palm Grease Herbie Hancock: Watermelon Man Herbie Hancock: Rockit Palm Grease Weather Report: Young and Fine Rusty Bryant: Fire Eater Grover Washington Jr.: Hydra Actual Proof Rhodes Piano Demo Actual Proof Butterfly toe: two moons Palm Grease Gil Scott Heron & Brian Jackson: Peace Go With You Brother Herbie Hancock: Chameleon Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!  
No single artist has come up on this show more than The Purple One and it's not hard to see why. His enormous discography is filled to the brim with timeless records and undeniable fire.  Parade came at an interesting time in Prince's career; it would be the last album he recorded with The Revolution and was, ostensibly, the soundtrack to Prince's film Under the Cherry Moon, a critical and commercial flop. Parade endured and became one of his best selling albums, garnering near universal praise and launched his already successful career into the stratosphere.  Writer and artist Gabrielle Civil joins Oliver and guest co-host Ernest Hardy in the studio to discuss Under the Cherry Moon, the chances Prince took with the production of Parade, and the role of women in his world.  More on Gabrielle Civil Gabrielle's memoir in performance art Swallow The Fish The Text is my Body: A Conversation with Gabrielle Civil (The Rumpus) Website  More on Parade Prince's Parade Stakes a Claim to Popularity (New York Times) BBC's review of Parade Show Tracklisting (all songs from Parade unless indicated otherwise) Do U Lie Life Can Be So Nice Venus De Milo Christopher Tracy's Parade I Wonder U Under the Cherry Moon Girls & Boys I Wonder U Prince: Old Friends 4 Sale Sometimes It Snows in April Meshell Ndegeocello: Sometimes It Snows in April Sometimes It Snows in April Life Can Be So Nice Anotherloverholenyohead Kiss Prince: When Doves Cry I Wonder U Under the Cherry Moon Kiss  Anotherloverholenyohead Christopher Tracy's Parade New Position Sometimes It Snows in April Stevie Wonder: Send One Your Love Aretha Franklin: Something He Can Feel Camille: 1,2,3 Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
Although Grease was originally a somewhat raunchy Broadway musical, the film and the soundtrack (released 2 months ahead of the film's release) has left a lasting impact on millions of young adults the world over. Its relatable themes and catchy tunes have stuck with audiences, even 40 years after its initial release. The soundtrack contained numbers performed by the cast and more than a few songs by 1950s revivalist band, Sha Na Na. It went on to top the Billboard music charts, selling over 8 million copies, and helped launch Olivia Newton-John's career into a completely different direction. It also spawned a sequel, a recent live television special, and just this year, a Rydell High spinoff was just ordered by HBO. Dancer and choreographer Luis Xtravaganza joins Oliver and guest co-host Ernest Hardy to discuss his love of the soundtrack, the influence it had on his career, and why you just can't not dance to so many of these earworms. Grease is the word. More on Luis Xtravaganza Werque podcast Luis' werque dance classes Instagram | Facebook More on the Grease OST Grease is the Word (People) "How Grease Beat the Odds and Became the Biggest Movie Musical of the 20th Century" (Vanity Fair) Grease Turns 40 (Hollywood Reporter) Show Tracklisting (all songs from the Grease soundtrack unless indicated otherwise) You're the One That I Want Greased Lightnin' Grease Summer Nights There Are Worse Things I Can Do Alone At A Drive In Movie Michelle Pfeiffer: Cool Rider Alison Moyet: There Are Worse Things I Can Do Hopelessly Devoted to You Olivia Newton-John: I Honestly Love You Born to Hand Jive Summer Nights Born to Hand Jive Grease We Go Together Blondie: Tide Is High We Go Together The Shirelles: Tonight's the Night Jennifer Hudson: And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going Yvonne Elliman: If I Can't Have You Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
The Album: Whitney Houston My Love Is Your Love (1998) What was initially supposed to be a greatest hits compilation ended up being a full-on album. Whitney got everyone on this record. Babyface, Kelly Price, Faith Evans, Missy, and even Mariah Carey, all came into the studio to help create a true heat rock; four times platinum, six Grammy nominations, and the Oscar for Best Original Song/ Writer and critic Gerrick Kennedy joins Oliver and Morgan in the studio to talk about Whitney's move to hip-hop, her growth as an artist from her last studio album, and how this record helped celebrate black womanhood in a way that was so rarely heard at that time. More on Gerrick Kennedy Gerrick's work at the Los Angeles Times Parental Discrection is Advised: The Rise of N.W.A. and the Dawn of Gangsta Rap Website|Twitter More on My Love Is Your Love 20 Years Later: Whitney Houston’s ‘My Love is Your Love’ Album Singles Ranked (Rated R&B) Whitney performing Heartbreak Hotel on Rosie O'Donnell Show Tracklisting (all songs from My Love Is Your Love unless otherwise stated) My Love Is Your Love It's Not Right But It's Okay Lauryn Hill: Ex-Factor It's Not Right But It's Okay (Remix) Aaliyah: Are You That Somebody Brandy: Never Say Never Brandy: The Boy Is Mine If I Told You That Heartbreak Hotel Heartbreak Hotel (Live) Get It Back Total: Trippin' Deborah Cox: Nobody's Supposed to Be Here Whitney Houston: Tell Me No Oh Yes In My Business Heartbreak Hotel I Learned From The Best When You Believe My Love Is Your Love If I Told You That Oh Yes Get It Back When You Believe I Learned From The Best Kelly Price: Secret Love Deborah Cox: 2 Good 2 Be True Missy Elliot: All N My Grill   Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there. If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
The Album: Nina Simone To Love Somebody (1969) Nina Simone's discography is vast and full of true fire, but To Love Somebody often gets overlooked. Perhaps it's because it was released right after 'Nuff Said and Nina Simone and Piano, both fantastic albums in their own right. And although the album contained almost all covers (Revolution 1 and 2 were credited to Simone and Weldon Irvine), she found a way to make every single song truly her own.  Luz Mendoza of Y La Bamba joins Oliver and Morgan in the studio to discuss the chances Nina took on this album, the smaller, quieter moments in the music, and what Nina told us about herself throughout this LP. This is an episode you definitely do not want to miss. More on Y La Bamba Y La Bamba's Tiny Desk Concert Entre Los Dos on Bandcamp Website|Twitter More on To Love Somebody The story behind Cosi Ti Amo Aquarium Drunkard's review of To Love Somebody Show Tracklisting (all songs from To Love unless indicated otherwise) I Can't See Nobody Bob Dylan: I Shall Be Released I Shall Be Released I Can't See Nobody Y La Bamba: Octavio The Times They Are A-Changin' The Byrds: Turn, Turn, Turn (To Everything There is a Season) Turn, Turn, Turn, (To Everything There is a Season) Revolution (Pt. 2) Revolution (Pt. 1) Revolution (Pt. 2) Suzanne Leonard Cohen: Suzanne Bob Dylan: Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues Bee Gees: To Love Somebody To Love Somebody Cosi Ti Amo The Glory of Love I Shall Be Released Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues James Brown: September Song Meshell Ndegeocello: Nite and Day La Lupe: Fever Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts do it here!
The Album: Karen Dalton In My Own Time (1971) In My Own Time was the second and final studio album by Karen Dalton, a musician who preferred to stay out of the spotlight. She didn't enjoy much commercial success when she was here with us, but the impact she left on the world is immeasurable. Artists like Joanna Newsom, Nick Cave, and Bob Dylan have cited her as an influence (Dylan would even back her up on harmonica in live performances). Her unique voice, often compared to Billie Holiday, was a blend of bluesy, world-weary, and haunting, but warm. Music writer James Woodbury joins Oliver and Morgan to discuss Karen's voice in the world of strangely captivating voices, the value of reissue labels, and Karen's interpretations of popular songs. Join us as we leave for the country and take a deep dive into this forgotten classic. More on Jason Woodbury Jason's monthly podcast Transmissions on Aquarium Drunkard The Tastemaker's Ten: Jason Woodbury (YabYum) Website | Twitter More on In My Own Time PopMatters' review of In My Own Time In My Own Time's Wikipedia entry Show Tracklisting (all songs from In My Own Time unless indicated otherwise): Take Me Joanna Newsom: Sadie Wall: Something on Your Mind When a Man Loves a Woman Laura Nyro & Labelle: Jimmy Mack In My Own Dream Esther Phillips: Home is Where the Hatred Is Angela McCluskey: It's Been Done Tiny Tim: Tiptoe Through the Tulips with Me In A Station Something On Your Mind Take Me George Jones & Tammy Wynette: Take Me Something On Your Mind One Night of Love Same Old Man Are You Leaving for the Country When a Man Loves a Woman Judee Still: Jesus was a Cross Maker Valerie June: Workin' Woman Blues Big Mama Thornton: Sweet Little Angel Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts do it here!  
The Album: Wild Style soundtrack(1983) Wild Style began as a low budget but ambitious film project, centered around Zoro, a young graffiti writer swashbuckling his way through the style wars of early ‘80s New York. Directed by Charlie Ahearn and starring Lee Quinones as Zoro, Wild Style would become more of a quasi-documentary of hip-hop’s on its cusp from South Bronx street culture into the global phenomenon we know today. Filled with MC, graffiti, DJ and b-boy performances from a host of now legends, Wild Style would inadvertently spread the hip-hop gospel to a generation of youth around the world, enraptured with how it depictions of an explosive, impossibly colorful subculture that few had laid eyes on outside of the five boroughs. Its soundtrack, overseen by Fab Five Freddy and Blondie guitarist Chris Stein, was largely built off an exclusive disc of original breakbeats that became the sound bed for various live performance scenes throughout the movie. Electric, dynamic and fly as hell, the Wild Style soundtrack helped capture the sound of early hip-hop’s energy and flair from A to motherf—ng Z. For a young Jeff Chang, growing up far away from the Bronx in Honolulu, Wild Style was like a secret cypher that he and his friends could pass around and decrypt. Long before the days of streaming video, if you didn’t catch a theatrical screening of this tiny, indie flick, you had to rely on nth generation bootleg dubs on VHS but as crappy as the images might have been, the inspiration was no less dimmed. This put Chang on the path to eventually become one of the most accomplished hip-hop critics in the formative ‘90s era, eventually culminating in his award winning Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation (2005), which, among other things, digs deep into hip-hop’s earliest days preceding even the Wild Style era. He’s since followed that up with Who We Be: The Colorization of America (2014) and most recently, We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation (2016) which became the inspiration behind the digital video series of the same name which just debuted this year. More on Jeff Chang Interview with Jeff by Oliver about Can't Stop Won't Stop How Hip-Hop Got It's Name by Jeff, written for Cuepoint Website | Twitter More on The Wild Style soundtrack Wild Style Breaks: The Untold Story (Red Bull Academy) The Oral History of Wild Style (Complex) Jay Smooth Interviews Charlie Ahearn Show Tracklisting (all songs from The Wild Style soundtrack unless indicated otherwise): Stoop Rap Stoop Rap - Film Version Cuckoo Clocking Military Cut Nas: The Genesis Stoop Rap Gang Star: DJ Premier In Deep Concentration Gangbusters Common: Gettin' Down At The Amphitheater MC Battle at the Dixie A Tribe Called Quest: Sucka N**** Fantastic Freaks at the Dixie Public Enemy: Raise the Roof Wild Style Lesson MC Battle at the Dixie Down By Law Grandmaster Flash: Flash it to the Beat (Live) Lisa Lee Wild Style deleted scene T's Limo Ride Double Trouble at the Amphitheater Basketball Throwdown Gangbusters South Bronx Subway Rap Subway Theme Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
The Album: Sam Cooke Portrait Of A Legend (2003) Legendary soul singer Lee Fields (Daptone, Truth & Soul, Big Crown Records) stopped by Heat Rocks to discuss the 30 tracks compiled by ABKCO records on Sam Cooke, Portrait of A Legend, released in the summer of 2003. The album covers multi-genres including gospel, pop and soul - Sam's hits, during his storied 15 year career which ended tragically with his untimely death at 33. Referred to as, "the man who invented soul" Sam Cooke hummed and crooned his way into soul music's canon starting with three words: You Send Me. Lee Fields' career began 50 years ago with the release of his first single on the Bedford label "Bewildered". Since then he's released dance tracks, recorded with The Expressions, had his music placed in shows like Atlanta and Dear White People, toured the country and has his songs remixed by some of the best. He and Morgan discussed the gospel according to Sam Cooke, symbolism in A Change Is Gonna Come, Sam Cooke as a lyricist, Sam Cooke as a storyteller. A veteran soul singer in conversation about one of the architects of soul music It gets no better. More on Lee Fields Lee's bio on Big Crown Lee's Wikipedia entry Instagram | Twitter More on Sam Cooke Sam Cooke's story on NPR Sam Cooke's induction to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Show Tracklisting (all songs from Portrait Of A Legend unless indicated otherwise): Nothing Can Change This Love Lee Fields & The Expressions: Honey Dove Touch The Hem of His Garment You Send Me You Were Made For Me Only Sixteen Soul Sam Cooke & The Soul Stirrers: The Last Mile of the Way Little Red Rooster Chain Gang Cupid Bring It On Home To Me Nothing Can Change This Love (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons Summertime You Send Me Sugar Dumpling Muhammad Ali: The Gang's All Here A Change Is Gonna Come Aretha Franklin: A Change Is Gonna Come Otis Redding: A Change Is Gonna Come Touch The Hem Of His Garment You Were Made For Me Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!
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Comments (9)

KDW

great epsisode!! thanks to wendy and lisa for sharing. brings the fans even closer to the music and, of course, Prince.

Jan 10th
Reply

alphab8a1

Morgan and Oliver, I thoroughly enjoy your podcast. Thank you for the great work. One of the greatest uses of the "Funky Drummer" sample is the 1986 DJ Polo and Kool G Rap single "It's a Demo" produced by the inimitable DJ Marley Marl. He didn't just use a loop of the break. He chopped and diced this sample and made his own pattern. Long before doing so was commonplace. This is my all time favorite use of "Funky Drummer." I challenge anyone to find a more virtuosic orchestration of this sample than in "Demo." Kool G is fresh on scene with this single putting the first brick in his strong legacy. Not to mention Marley's masterful use of "Get Up, Get into It, Get Involved" on Kool G's single "Poison". Which went on to be the title and main sample of BBD's first hit single. Highly anticipating the rest of this series. Respect and continued success with the show and in life.

Apr 11th
Reply

alphab8a1

Morgan and Oliver, I thoroughly enjoy your podcast. Thank you for the great work. One of the greatest uses of the "Funky Drummer" sample is the 1986 DJ Polo and Kool G Rap single "It's a Demo" produced by the inimitable DJ Marley Marl. He didn't just use a loop of the break. He chopped and diced this sample and made his own pattern. Long before doing so was commonplace. This is my all time favorite use of "Funky Drummer." I challenge anyone to find a more virtuosic orchestration of this sample than in "Demo." Kool G is fresh on scene with this single putting the first brick in his strong legacy. Not to mention Marley's masterful use of "Get Up, Get into It, Get Involved" on Kool G's single "Poison". Which went on to be the title and main sample of BBD's first hit single. Highly anticipating the rest of this series. Respect and continued success with the show and in life.

Apr 11th
Reply

Sam Andersen

This witty, articulate, insightful podcast has changed the way I think and talk about songs, songwriters, artists and albums; and has broadened my musical landscape exponentially. I could listen to Morgan read the phone book, so grateful that I get to hear her wise and deep and hilarious self do so much more. 5 Star Review.

Feb 16th
Reply

Mequel Scott

Omg

Feb 2nd
Reply

justmarla724

loved this episode.. per usual 🔥🔥🔥

Aug 24th
Reply

tlc jr

I'm 15 years old all over again listening to this. Thanks!

Jun 13th
Reply

justmarla724

Salute to #drdre and #thechronic.... dope episode as always.... #playingcatchup

Apr 19th
Reply

justmarla724

loved this episode and this album...so many memories...😍😍😍

Apr 19th
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