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Matt Cook and Alison Oram discuss their new book Queer Beyond London, which uncovers the LGBTQ experience in four English cities – Brighton, Manchester, Plymouth and Leeds – from the sixties to the noughties. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, they consider how local people, places and politics shaped LGBTQ lives in each city, establishing individual cultures often very distinct from the national narrative. (Ad) Alison Oram and Matt Cook are the authors of Queer Beyond London (Manchester University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fqueer-beyond-london%2Fprofessor-matt-cook%2Fprofessor-alison-oram%2F9781526145864 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their 15 minutes of fame. In today’s episode, Suzannah Lipscomb tells Emily Briffett about the life of Marguerite de Navarre, a 16th-century royal player who had a major influence on both the Renaissance and Reformation.If you’re enjoying this series and would like early access to more episodes, head to www.historyextra.com/15-minutes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Who founded the Mali empire? What impact did Islam have on its trajectory? What were its interactions with medieval Europe like? And what made its greatest leader, Mansa Musa, so fabulously wealthy? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Kevin MacDonald answers listener questions on one of Africa’s greatest historical powers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the latest instalment of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy talks to Matt Elton about the political pressures and fissures that defined the 1970s and 80s – and the ways in which they shaped the corporation’s output. (Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the third episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove looks at how far Britain was a militarised state between the third and fifth centuries. Historian Dr Rob Collins explains how Roman Britain was set up to support the military machine of the wider empire, and what might have happened when that military machine began to falter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Who were the Celts?

Who were the Celts?

2022-06-2234:122

Simon Jenkins considers the enigmatic story of the Celts, and asks whether any such people ever actually existed. Speaking with David Musgrove, he also questions what the term ‘Celtic’ should mean to us today. (Ad) Simon Jenkins is the author of The Celts: A Sceptical History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-celts%2Fsimon-jenkins%2F9781788168809 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sally Smith considers the contributions made and significant firsts achieved by British women in the field of aviation, from ballooning and parachuting, to piloting airships and fixed-wing aircraft. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she highlights the extraordinary lives these pioneers led and the trials they faced in order to achieve success. (Ad) Sally Smith is the author of Magnificent Women and Flying Machines: The First 200 Years of British Women in the Sky (The History Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magnificent-Women-Flying-Machines-British/dp/075099746X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Claire Jowitt discusses the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk  Claire Jowitt speaks to Matt Elton about the news of the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk – and why it might be the most important maritime find in decades.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In our latest everything you wanted to know episode, Dr John Jacob Woolf answers listener questions on Edwardian Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he touches on subjects ranging from suffrage, labour movements, empire and international relations, to leisure time, childhood and roller-skating. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Half a century on from the Watergate scandal, Clifford Williamson explores its twists and turns, its key players, and its lasting impact on American politics. Speaking with Matt Elton, he explains how the conspiracy sparked a constitutional crisis that brought down a president. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the second episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove investigates what life was like for people living in the later Roman era, in the third and fourth centuries. He speaks to Professor Will Bowden to explore the inequalities that existed between the haves and have-nots, and how far the stresses and strains that were at play in the wider empire impacted on everyday life in Britain. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the first episode in our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Tyrone Freeman speaks to Helen Carr about his award-winning research into charitable traditions in African-American communities. The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Hear more conversations with other winners of the 2022 Dan David prize, early and ad-free now at historyextra.com/dan-david-prize. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Francesca Stavrakopoulou, author of the Wolfson History Prize shortlisted book God: An Anatomy, discusses what ancient biblical texts tell us about the body of God. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she traces the origins of God back to an ancient deity called Yahweh, and talks about the challenges of working on religious history. (Ad) Francesca Stavrakopoulou is the author of God: An Anatomy (Picador, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/God-Anatomy-Francesca-Stavrakopoulou/dp/1509867333/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In June 1942, the US and Japanese navies went head to head over a small atoll in the middle of the Pacific ocean. Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor, authors of The Silver Waterfall, speak to Ellie Cawthorne about the factors that led to the United States’ victory at Midway, exploring the importance of American industrial innovation, and reflecting on the extent to which Midway changed the course of the Pacific War. (Ad) Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor are the authors of The Silver Waterfall: How America Won the War in the Pacific at Midway (PublicAffairs, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2F9781541701373 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Who maintained law and order before the police? When did Britain ban capital punishment – and why? And what are some of the weirdest punishments doled out through history? Historian of crime Nell Darby answers listener questions on crime and punishment through history. Speaking to Rachel Dinning, she discusses subjects ranging from the origins of the police to the history of prisons and the death penalty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
From the “Blitz spirit” invoked in the Covid-19 pandemic, to the 16th-century sense that a lost greatness needed to be recovered, historian Hannah Rose Woods reveals how nostalgia for a bygone era is nothing new. Speaking to Elinor Evans about her new book Rule, Nostalgia, she discusses the various ways our ancestors have looked back at our national past. (Ad) Hannah Rose Woods is the author of Rule, Nostalgia: A Backwards History of Britain (Ebury Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Frule-nostalgia%2Fhannah-rose-woods%2F9780753558737%23%3A~%3Atext%3DRule%2C%20Nostalgia%20is%20a%20timely%2C%3A%20past%2C%20present%20and%20future See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What really happened in Britain as Roman influence waned? Recent research is shaking up our view of the end of imperial rule during the fifth century, and one new find in particular – a mosaic at Chedworth Roman villa – is leading experts to reassess how far people carried on “being Roman”. In the opening episode of our new series, David Musgrove takes a trip to Chedworth to begin his investigation into the end of Roman Britain. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones tells Spencer Mizen why Eurocentric depictions of the “barbarous” Persians have obscured the achievements of one of the ancient world’s great civilisations. (Ad) Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones is the author of Persians: The Age of The Great Kings (Wildfire, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Persians-Great-Professor-Lloyd-Llewellyn-Jones/dp/1472277287/ref=asc_df_1472277287/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=535049525184&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5614143262630945554&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1410292999858&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Professor Mark Knights discusses how ideas about corruption were transformed in Britain and its empire between 1600 and 1850. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he delves into the shady realms of bribery and electoral corruption and the blurred lines between public service and private gain. (Ad) Mark Knights is the author of Trust and Distrust: Corruption in Office in Britain and its Empire, 1600-1850 (Oxford University press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Ftrust-and-distrust%2Fmark-knights%2F9780198796244 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The First World War unleashed an unprecedented wave of violence, and medicine struggled to keep up. British surgeon Harold Gillies was at the forefront of those dragging plastic surgery into the modern age, reconstructing the faces of thousands of soldiers. Lindsey Fitzharris speaks to Rhiannon Davies about Gillies’ remarkable contribution to medical science. (Ad) Lindsey Fitzharris is the author of The Facemaker: A Visionary Surgeon's Battle to Mend the Disfigured Soldiers of World War I (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-facemaker%2Flindsey-fitzharris%2F2928377080389 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Comments (138)

皮皮羊

how can i see the subtitle?

Jun 22nd
Reply

Susan Irvine

And no mention that Gillies was born and bred in Dunedin, New Zealand. He was even called the "British surgeon" in the introduction. I would have thought NZ's creative ingenuity (known as ' the Number 8 wire' culture) would gave been an interesting theme for examination...

Jun 6th
Reply

Peter Maruff

The academic says argh and umm too frequently. She needed to relax and let her speech flow.

Apr 24th
Reply

Isobel Holland

There are still massed trespasses. I understand wild swimmers are planning one near Kinderscout. If Scotland can have free access to inland water, why can't England?

Apr 23rd
Reply

microphonemayne

series, not season

Mar 25th
Reply

kps3

Stolen statues, fat old men & boiled water: the History of England.

Mar 22nd
Reply

William M

So what exactly does he conclude is his reasoning for his statement that "ALL science is political"? He didn't really answer the question or if he did then it doesn't make sense....

Mar 21st
Reply

Jouel Liriano

Very insightful episode. Well done sir!

Feb 15th
Reply

Josie Van Embden

Irish genocide....

Nov 28th
Reply

Andrew Browne

you could self identify.....sure. .just proves the oligarchy has always had different rules

Nov 23rd
Reply

Peter Maruff

Mr Fiennes rambles on and on and on. The poor interviewer doesn't get a chance to interrupt his rambles to ask other questions.

Nov 17th
Reply

Adam Woellhaf

isn't this the same audio as ep 2?

Oct 31st
Reply

JaMeshuggah

by sacrificing their peasantry into their meat grinder

Sep 29th
Reply (1)

Hannah Morgan

Will be looking out for this book, sounds like a really interesting topic

Sep 13th
Reply

Sophie Gates

this was one of the most interesting episodes in a long time, what a great topic and the questions answered so well!

Sep 9th
Reply

JaMeshuggah

From the country that brought you "illegal opinions":

Aug 18th
Reply (11)

Peter Maruff

Every second word from this guy is arrhh or umm. can't listen to him.

Aug 5th
Reply (1)

Kate Babbage

That was so interesting!

Jul 31st
Reply

Josie Van Embden

This is an ex fbi agent, who is claiming that the stasi have not really gone away but have somehow gone on to influence the modern European left. Bizarre. Don't vote Labour what ever you do 🙈He's not a historian. I wish the interviewer had challenged him a little bit more on his views. Such a pity because a book by an actual historian on the subject would be interesting.

May 24th
Reply

Kayl matthew

do more research. those so called attempts on castro were from redacted files which never happened

May 8th
Reply
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