DiscoverHow I Built This with Guy Raz
How I Built This with Guy Raz
Claim Ownership

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Author: NPR

Subscribed: 554,959Played: 7,705,708
Share

Description

Guy Raz dives into the stories behind some of the world's best known companies. How I Built This weaves a narrative journey about innovators, entrepreneurs and idealists—and the movements they built. Pre-order the How I Built This book at https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis.
300 Episodes
Reverse
The former CEO of Zappos, Tony Hsieh has died. He was 46 years old. We are grateful that Tony shared his story with us in 2017 and we are republishing it as a tribute to his life and career. Tony was a computer scientist whose first company made millions off the dot-com boom. But he didn't make his mark until he built Zappos—a customer service company that "happens to sell shoes." Tony stepped down as CEO of Zappos in August 2020; the company is worth over a billion dollars and is known for its unorthodox management style.
Dr. Iman Abuzeid is the co-founder and CEO of Incredible Health, a digital platform that helps streamline the hiring process for nurses and recruiting hospitals. After seeing an increased demand for nurses in April, and a shift to hiring digitally, the platform has now been able to expedite the hiring process to 15 days or less, compared to an industry standard of 90 days. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
The Lip Bar: Melissa Butler

The Lip Bar: Melissa Butler

2020-11-2301:22:521

While working long hours as a Wall Street analyst, Melissa Butler started making lipstick in her kitchen as a hobby. But it soon turned into an obsession, costing thousands of dollars. She was frustrated by the lack of diversity in the cosmetics industry, and as a Black woman, wanted to create lipstick colors that complimented her complexion and style. So in 2010, she launched The Lip Bar, with bold colors like green and purple, and boozy names like "Cosmo" and "Sour Apple Martini." Undeterred by a disastrous appearance on Shark Tank with her partner Rosco Spears, Melissa was motivated to pitch her lipstick to Target, and in 2016, launched a new color on Target's online store. Today, The Lip Bar has expanded to 500 Target stores, and has continued to grow a following, despite the pain points of the pandemic. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Father Gregory Boyle is the founder of Homeboy Industries, one of the largest gang-intervention, rehabilitation and re-entry programs in the world. He speaks with Guy about how the Los Angeles based organization has adapted to continue training and employing people during the pandemic. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Kenneth Cole: Kenneth Cole

Kenneth Cole: Kenneth Cole

2020-11-1601:17:342

Kenneth Cole launched his shoe business out of a forty-foot truck in midtown Manhattan and quickly became known as an up-and-coming designer with an eye for street fashion. In 1986, he made a bold move by associating his nascent brand with a controversial issue at the time: the AIDS crisis, and the vital need for research. Through the 1990s and 2000s, Kenneth grew the company into a $500M brand, leading it through downturns, department store consolidation, an IPO and a return to private ownership. Throughout, he stayed committed to AIDS research and many other social causes. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Dropbox: Drew Houston

Dropbox: Drew Houston

2020-11-0949:588

In 2006, Drew Houston got on a bus from Boston heading to New York. He planned to use the three-hour ride to get some work done, so he opened his laptop, and realized he had left his thumb drive with all of his work files at home. Drew decided he never wanted to have that problem again. On that bus ride, he started writing the code to build a cloud-based file storage and sharing service he called Dropbox. Fourteen years later, Drew and his co-founder, Arash Ferdowsi, have built Dropbox into a public company worth close to $8 billion. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Guy talks with Varshini Prakash, co-founder of Sunrise Movement, a grassroots organization that's fighting to make climate change a top priority in the US. The group launched in 2017 and has since grown into one of the largest youth movements in the country. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders about how they're navigating these turbulent times.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

Famous Dave's: Dave Anderson

2020-11-0201:17:418

Growing up in 1960's Chicago, Dave Anderson didn't eat much deep dish. Instead, his dad took the family to the South Side for barbecue, and those memories—and aromas—stayed with him. For years, Dave tinkered with his own recipes for sauces and sides while working as a salesman and business advisor to Native American tribes. Finally in 1994, he opened his first barbecue shack in the last place you might expect to find one: the little town of Hayward, Wisconsin. The chain grew quickly—too quickly—and Dave developed a love-hate relationship with the brand he'd created, but never lost his passion for smoked ribs and brisket. Today, Famous Dave's has around 125 restaurants across the U.S., making it one of the largest barbecue chains in the country. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Justin Gold is the founder of Justin's, known for its nut butters and chocolate peanut butter cups. He talks about how he started by pulverizing peanuts in his home blender, and describes how his customers are shopping differently during the pandemic. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating these turbulent times.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Do Big Things is a Black woman-led, mission-driven digital agency that works with companies like Google, Etsy, and the NAACP, and has a staff that's 50% people of color. The agency's CEO and founder Cheryl Contee says having a diverse team is a strategy for authentic engagement. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
After Robin McBride and Andréa McBride John made the extraordinary discovery that they were half-sisters, they formed a deep bond and discovered a mutual dream: to create a wine company that would demystify wine culture and attract a wider audience. In the mid-2000s, they staked their life savings on an importer's license and began selling New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc to high-end restaurants, eventually partnering with larger companies to test out their blends and learn more about the business. In 2016, they decided to take a leap and create their own collection. Today, their wine—including the signature brand Black Girl Magic—is on grocery shelves across the country, and the McBride Sisters Collection is one of the biggest Black-owned wine companies in the world. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Fluenz helps English speakers learn new languages, both online and with in-person immersion programs. With travel restrictions and a global pandemic, CEO and founder Sonia Gil had to scrap her in-person immersion programs, and create a new system for teaching students remotely. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
When we first spoke with Robin McBride and Andréa McBride John, we were so blown away by their story that we decided to turn it into two episodes. With hardly any money or connections, they built one of the biggest Black-owned wine companies in the world — a journey that began with an extraordinary family discovery: Robin and Andréa are half-sisters who didn't know of each other's existence until they were both young women. Robin grew up in California, and at the age of 25, she received a letter with life-changing news: she had a younger sister living in New Zealand. The sisters met for the first time in 1999, formed an instant bond, and soon realized they shared a deep interest in the art of winemaking. They began dreaming about building their own company—one that would open up the wine industry to people who often feel shut out of it. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
In the late 1990s, Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan took on the notion that "green doesn't clean" by setting out to make soap that could clean a bathtub without harming the environment. Adam started experimenting with baking soda, vinegar, and scented oils, while Eric worked on making sleek bottles that looked good on a kitchen counter. Just a few years later, Adam and Eric were selling Method cleaning products in stores throughout the country, after a bold gamble got them on the shelves of Target.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
When a Sports Illustrated article exposed internal abuse and harassment in the Dallas Mavericks organization, owner Mark Cuban knew he had a culture problem. So he hired Cynt Marshall as CEO, and she tells Guy how she started to turn things around, and how she's leading the organization through this unprecedented moment. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Aishetu Dozie had a successful career in finance before she took a leap and launched Bossy, a makeup brand that has exploded in popularity over the past six months, despite the challenges of the pandemic. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Working at a high-end beauty salon in the south of England in the early 1970's, Mark Constantine concocted natural shampoos and conditioners in a tiny room above his kitchen, and soon met another young entrepreneur who was eager to buy his products: Anita Roddick of The Body Shop. Their partnership flourished for a while, then soured; so Mark went on to start a mail-order cosmetics business with his wife and several others. After that business went bust and Mark was nearly broke, he decided to take one more leap to launch Lush, a cosmetics shop whose distinctive soaps and bath bombs developed a passionate following. Today, Lush has about 900 stores around the world and is adapting to pressures of a pandemic economy.Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
January Ventures is an investment firm that is trying to address the unique challenges and biases faced by entrepreneurs often under-represented in business, including women and people of color. The firm's co-founder and managing partner Jennifer Neundorfer says that despite more attention in the recent months, great ideas from these diverse groups have always been there. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
Yelp founder Jeremy Stoppelman says his leadership team anticipated a "nuclear winter" after the pandemic hit. But as businesses start to re-open, and ad revenues on the site creep back up, Yelp is bringing back furloughed employees and adding Covid-conscious features to its listings. These conversations are excerpts from our How I Built Resilience series, where Guy talks online with founders and entrepreneurs about how they're navigating turbulent times. Order the How I Built This book at:https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
In 2012, Daina Trout, her husband Justin, and her best friend Vanessa Dew were sitting around a kitchen table spit-balling possible business ideas. Their biggest contender seemed to be a natural product to treat hair loss. Turns out, it's harder than they thought to make one, so they landed on something completely different: a brand of homemade kombucha they called Health-Ade. After nine months of brewing kombucha in their kitchen and selling it at local farmer's markets, the three co-founders quit their jobs to pursue Health-Ade full time. Seven years later, Health-Ade brews 120,000 bottles of Kombucha every day, and does close to $200 million in retail sales. Order the How I Built This book at: https://smarturl.it/HowIBuiltThis
loading
Comments (358)

Студент Большой

I see palm oil in ingredients list, I never buy this product. The way the founder defends the use of palm oil, like "it's very visible", we don't hide it, hilarious.

Dec 1st
Reply

James Smith

Repairing a rim can cost as little as $75, but sometimes cracks require welding and tire removal. These processes have added costs, and can end up costing you several hundred dollars per wheel. If rims need to be replaced, the price tag can run anywhere from $200 to $500 for each new wheel, depending on your car. https://highlightstory.com/why-is-bent-rims-repair-always-better-than-replacement-things-to-know/ https://bankingdecision.com https://academicsession.com https://techmarkettoday.com https://holidaytakeoff.com https://growwebtraffic.com https://solidbusinessidea.com https://selfcareadvise.com https://vehiclesdetail.com https://vvipproperty.com https://lawordinance.com https://gambleinsights.com

Oct 31st
Reply

James Smith

Repairing a rim can cost as little as $75, but sometimes cracks require welding and tire removal. These processes have added costs, and can end up costing you several hundred dollars per wheel. If rims need to be replaced, the price tag can run anywhere from $200 to $500 for each new wheel, depending on your car.

Oct 31st
Reply

Jason Berry

call me #1 wooooooo

Oct 19th
Reply (1)

Shree Balaji Sampath

Guy is the best Story teller. love the How I built this show

Oct 15th
Reply

ID10149328

Loved this piece on Khan Academy! Sal got me through undergraduate chemistry, physics and advanced math courses as a science major ten years ago while I was at the UW (Seattle). This free resource allowed me to get through coursework I REALLY struggled with at the time, and played a big part in me eventually starting a career as a civil engineer. I’m confident his creation will help now students through this trying time away from the physical classroom.

Sep 28th
Reply

Cristi D

Such a funny guy with a fresh different story! Since me and my son have used Khan Academy for learning a few new things, Sal's story was interesting and inspiring.

Sep 24th
Reply

Stephanie Yu

David's voice sounds kind of like David Dobrik

Sep 22nd
Reply

Richard Ottley

awesome story 😊

Sep 21st
Reply

Richard Ottley

great story ☺️

Sep 21st
Reply

upendar kattal

Guy is not a simp

Sep 11th
Reply

xa

Sorry but she literally got the huge following just by being an attractive female gamer. She makes millions from random guys donating thousands of dollars just so she says their name.

Sep 10th
Reply

Mustafa Thunder

by far the most inspiring, entertaining episode I have heard not just on this podcast but on any entrepreneurship podcast. it is worth listening to every week, if not every day, once.

Sep 6th
Reply (8)

Marina B.

Amazing one !

Sep 5th
Reply

Simon Anderssen

everything given away in the intro.

Jul 19th
Reply

Candyce Bennett

Really enjoyed this episode. My family LOVES the Beyond Burgers, however they are kinda pricey so we only buy them when our grocery store has a BOGO. Looking forward to trying some of your other products.

Jul 18th
Reply

Jeannie

this is hands down, my favorite episode

Jul 13th
Reply

Kamilah Amica

I really like this one.

Jul 10th
Reply

Keyo Chali

my favorite podcast for business! I am starting a startup and I need this podcast so much, like more than anything else.

Jun 21st
Reply (1)

Arihant Dugar

Can anyone recommend which ones are the best ones here?

Jun 9th
Reply (2)
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store