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Great pitches can seem like genius or magic. But you don’t have to be a great salesperson to give a great pitch. Whether you’re floating an idea at a team meeting, looking for investors for your startup, or applying for your next job, life is full of pitching moments. In this episode, we bust myths about what it takes to drum up excitement–and share insights from Hollywood and Silicon Valley on ways to improve your chances of getting your audience on board. This is an episode of WorkLife with Adam Grant, another podcast in the TED Audio Collective. To hear more episodes on the science of making work not suck, follow WorkLife with Adam Grant wherever you're listening to this. For the full transcript of this episode, visit go.ted.com/WL44.
Dionna and Denise had a professional relationship that mostly worked–until it didn’t. After a string of mishaps in their workplace, a comment Denise made online sparked a fallout between the two coworkers. In this episode, we hear from both women about the power of impact regardless of intent, how assumptions cloud communication, and why forgiveness requires accountability, transparency, and a willingness to put yourself in another person’s shoes. This is an episode of the podcast Conversations With People Who Hate Me, another show from the TED Audio Collective. You can find and follow the show wherever you’re listening to this.
As the year draws to a close and the collective mood turns reflective, we asked you—our listeners—to pick moments from the first season that stuck with you and inspired you. In today’s episode, we yield the floor in gratitude and compiled some of those insights that resonated most with our community. From psychologist Guy Winch’s thoughts on strategic discomfort to poet Sarah Kay’s meditations on compassion, tune in for an eclectic collection of ideas to set you on that path toward becoming a better human in 2022. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
With all the terrible things happening in the world lately, does the idea of maintaining a spark of joy in your day to day feel unrealistic? Or even inappropriate? Today’s guest, Miracle Jones, believes that all the collective tragedy makes the role of joy in our routines even more crucial. She is a community organizer and queer activist who currently serves as the director of policy and advocacy at 1Hood Media. In today’s episode, Miracle meditates on the importance of joy as a catalyst for resilience, growth, and collective action, and shares how we can cultivate its practice even (and perhaps especially) in the darkest of times. You can learn more about Miracle’s work at 1hood.org. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Whether you’re the kind of person who “gets in their feels” or you’re more the type to sweep things under the rug, all humans experience emotions. And the way we tend to those emotions directly affects the way we see our lives, says today’s guest, Susan David. She is a psychologist and author of the book “Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life” (Avery, 2016). In today’s episode, Susan explains how “emotional agility”--a process that enables us to navigate life's twists and turns--, powers self-acceptance, and gives tips on how to cultivate our agility to lead more meaningful, successful lives. You can hear more from Susan on her TED Audio Collective podcast “Checking In with Susan David” streaming wherever you are listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Roses are red, violets are blue, has poetry ever been intimidating for you? For many people, this art form can feel unapproachable for a myriad of reasons, but today’s guest, poet and educator Sarah Kay, suggests that people who don’t like poetry just maybe haven’t found a poem that really speaks to them. In this episode, Sarah proposes a fresh approach to this ancient art, talks about why playing with language can help you get in touch with yourself, and discusses the ways that writing and art help us form deeper, meaningful connections with others. Plus, she shares helpful, fun, and low-stakes writing exercises that might encourage you to put pen to paper. Read Sarah’s poetry and more at kaysarahsera.com To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Can you think of a time when you told a story and remembered it...wrong? Perhaps you forgot a small detail, like the color of someone’s shoes, or something much bigger, like where the event took place. In a personal context, that might not seem like a huge deal. But what happens when what we misrepresent are our historical narratives? David Ikard is a Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies at Vanderbilt University. In this episode, he talks about the dangers of inaccurate history, shares tips on how to find work that can contextualize and bring nuance to your historical knowledge, and uncovers the real story of one of history’s most iconic figures. You can follow David’s work on Twitter @blkeducator. We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
When you think of your home or your childhood, what comes to mind? Did you feel cared for and loved? Did you trust that your parents were always doing what’s best for you? Whether you are a parent or a child, healthy communication is one of the most important aspects of an intentional relationship with your family. Today’s guest, Ebony Roberts, is a writer, educator, activist, and mother. After ending their relationship, she and her ex-partner (author Shaka Senghor) decided to continue co-parenting their child. In this episode, she shares tips on how to establish good communication at home and gives deep insight on how to prioritize trust, open-ness, and of course, love. You can read more about Ebony’s story in her book, “The love prison made and unmade” (Harper Collins, 2019) and check out her talk at TED.com We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
While technology and the internet have made accessing information easier than ever, how can we discern between the facts we need to make the right decisions and fictions that could actually cause us harm? Turns out there is a better way to search on the internet and find reliable information, both on- and offline. Today’s guest, Dr. Jen Gunter, is on a mission to help people find accurate health information online. In this episode, she shares tips on how to tell a reputable source from a questionable one, and how to foster a healthy sense of skepticism about the information that pops up into your life—from your social media feeds to random conversations. Dr. Gunter is an OB/GYN and pain medicine physician and a New York Times columnist. In addition to being both a doctor and a mother, she hosts the TED Audio Collective podcast “Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter”: https://www.ted.com/podcasts/body-stuff-with-dr-jen-gunter We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Have you ever wondered why there are seven days in a week? Or, why glaciers are blue—or what color even is? Today’s guest, YouTube creator Joe Hanson, makes a living by asking—and trying to answer—these kinds of questions. A biologist turned video producer and educator, Joe spends his days thinking about how telling stories and encouraging curiosity can help people think more deeply about the universe they live in, and engage with science in more meaningful ways. In this episode, he gives tips on how to unleash our innate desire to know things, explains what makes good science, and shares how cool facts can help you save the planet— and win big at trivia night. Joe was a part of Countdown, TED’s climate conference, which you can learn more about at countdown.ted.com. You can check out “It’s Okay To Be Smart”, Joe’s award-winning science education show from PBS Digital Studios, on YouTube. We want to know what you think about the podcast! Let us know your thoughts by visiting this link https://survey.prx.org/BetterHuman—and get a chance to be featured in a future episode To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Time with friends just isn’t the same with a screen in between you. That’s a struggle many have faced recently, with half of Americans saying they’ve lost touch with at least one friend during the pandemic. It can be sad, but is falling out of touch with friends normal? How many relationships should we maintain, and what are the different kinds of friendships we need anyways? Evolutionary psychologist Robin Dunbar has been studying social relationships for 50 years, and he has answers. Data journalist Mona Chalabi maps out her own relationships against the averages, and invites us to do the same. This is an episode of Am I Normal? with Mona Chalabi, another podcast from the TED Audio Collective. You can find and follow it wherever you're listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
If there’s one thing that connects all humans, it’s that everything we walk on, breathe, drink, and eat comes from the same source: planet Earth. From composting to cooking to taking climate action, today’s guests (including Chef Sean Sherman, comedian Jo Firestone, and activist Luisa Neubauer) share the many ways they try to connect to and protect the home we share-- and invite you to get involved in whatever way you can. You can check out TED’s efforts to build a world that is safer, cleaner and fairer for everyone at countdown.ted.com. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
When was the last time you really, really laughed? For some people, laughter comes easily and anything can set them off. But for many of us, finding humor in everyday life is something we might leave to the professionals. Jo Firestone is a comedian--and long-time friend of Chris’s--who frequently teaches all kinds of people the art of stand-up comedy. In today’s episode, she talks about how humor can be an act of connection, and how comedy can help us see the lighter sides of life, even in difficult times. Case in point: over the last year, Jo taught socially-distant stand-up to senior citizens over Zoom. Now, her students will be the stars of their very own comedy special, “Good Timing” which airs later this month. Barbara Bova, one of Jo’s hilarious students, also joins to share the comedy tips she learned and to tell some great jokes. Find more about Jo on her website at jofirestone.com and check out “Good Timing” on October 15. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
When you think of a scientist, do you think of a person in a lab coat? How about a teenager with a smartphone-- or even, yourself? Mary Ellen Hannibal is a science writer who argues that everyday people collecting data with simple tools like phones can make a big impact in the sciences, their lives, and their communities. She shares great tips on how to get involved with this vital, and hopefully enjoyable, work. Her book, “Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction”, was named one of the best titles of 2016 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Mary Ellen’s previous work has appeared in the New York Times, Science, Anthropocene, Nautilus and many other publications. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Imagine someone just pointed out you have something stuck in your teeth. A comment like that would probably make most of us self-conscious, but you’d probably be grateful for the heads up if you were about to head into a meeting. Now imagine that situation but with higher stakes, like your attitude at work or the way you behave with your partner. What would happen if we went through life unaware of how we are perceived? In today’s episode, organizational psychologist Tasha Eurich talks about what self-awareness even is and why seeking out what others see in you can be in your best interest. She also shares exercises to get to know yourself and your values, and why this knowledge is an important part of achieving your goals. Tasha is an executive coach and author of the book “Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think” (Currency, 2018). Her work has been featured in Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
If you are online and especially if you're on social media, it’s likely you’ve engaged with people whose opinions are different from your own. While those conversations can sometimes be informative, they often spiral into a vitriolic whirlpool of hurtful or even threatening comments. Dylan Marron is the creator and host of “Conversations with People Who Hate Me”, a podcast where he facilitates conversations and tries to explore the humanity of people online. In today’s episode, Dylan talks about why we shouldn’t forget that there are always people on the other side of our screens and shares what he’s learned about apologies, forgiveness, and the benefits of taking the time to explore and establish our personal boundaries. You can listen to Dylan’s podcast wherever you’re listening to this. To learn more about "How to Be a Better Human," host Chris Duffy, or find footnotes and additional resources, please visit: go.ted.com/betterhuman
Hustle culture, burnout, “toxic productivity.” Does today’s fast-paced world ever leave you feeling rushed? Dorie Clark teaches executive education at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and at Columbia Business School. In today’s episode, she talks about the importance of “playing the long-game”-- the idea that when it comes to planning for your enduring future success, it might be better to prioritize long-term payoff above overnight “wins.” Dorie discusses how pressure in our culture pushes us toward doing what’s quick and easy in the moment and helps us value the slow burn of persistence and effort. A frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, she consults and speaks for clients including Google, Microsoft, and the World Bank. You can find more about Dorie at dorieclark.com
Whether they are academics, designers, medical professionals, or anything in between, our guests are leaders in their fields whose expertise goes beyond their TED and TEDx talks. Unsurprisingly, they’ve garnered wisdom on how to navigate or forge a successful career. In today’s episode, organizational psychologist David Burkus, management professor Christine Porath, and Hollywood executive Franklin Leonard share powerful ideas and accessible strategies for anyone looking for thoughtful career advice.
Alison Bechdel. Eileen Myles. Kenny Fries. Saeed Jones. Four icons reflect on their journeys in this special Pride episode of Design Matters. For more episodes of Design Matters, find the podcast wherever you're listening to this.
Plastic is everywhere. We know we should cut down on it where we can, but is plastic ever the answer? In this episode, a whole world of plastic you never knew about. Starting with: which bag is best: paper, plastic, or cotton? The answer might surprise you. Dan breaks down the pros and cons of each bag, and which you should carry on your next shopping trip. Then we follow the journey of three different plastic bottles after you throw them away, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. Plus, three things you can do to put a cap on our plastic problem. This is an episode of TED Climate, another TED Audio Collective podcast. For more, find the podcast wherever you're listening to this. You can read the full text transcript for this episode at go.ted.com/TC1
Comments (29)

𝙼𝚊𝚎𝚍𝚎

it helped me sooo much🤩 thank youu

May 8th
Reply

M.K.A

Heard this was a favorite by listeners, and now know why Enlightening and heartfelt Perhaps it'll take time to find that special someone, but it's more important that that person feels special to you and vise versa Commitment is key, and from there stems respect, and ultimately, love

Mar 25th
Reply

M.K.A

Heart-warming and inspiring This's also a personal belief, that we all have an influence, an impact, regardless of how we view ourselves. Our very existence dictates it Happy they made up and look forward to working with each other + build a more authentic and understanding bond 👏

Mar 22nd
Reply

Elizabeth Twente

be encouraged

Jan 18th
Reply

Dana Pellegrino

Regarding that guest, George...being a relationship "expert" doesn't give you the right to define love for other people and tell them how they should be choosing a partner 🙄 it's a bit pretentious to think that he can just generalize those two things for every person on the planet. His advice isn't that good either. Bad guest.

Dec 20th
Reply

Aubrey Pata

"That kind of language hurts people" - so obvious but powerful. Great podcast, thank you so much ❤️

Nov 9th
Reply

Aubrey Pata

"You don't want to make someone think it's undiscussable" That's absolutely true, I've let what I interpret as someone else wanting to stop the topic guide my reactions without even asking how they feel. I was probably wrong.

Nov 9th
Reply (1)

Aubrey Pata

A statement and a question does not make it a long question. They're two different types of question not two different lengths.

Nov 9th
Reply

Aubrey Pata

I like the host better than Celeste in regards to empathy. Sharing your own experience, when done appropriately, expands both total understanding and the comprehension of the both parties. Even if your suggestions or experience is not directly useful, the participants become more creative. 9.5/10 I have assisted in the other person opening their mind and understanding their heart. It doesn't matter if their solution is the opposite of yours as long as you got them thinking instead of being completely overwhelmed with emotions or confusion.

Nov 9th
Reply

Raymond

lmao this trash podcast spends like 1/4 to 1/2 of their episodes on commercials. thankful for the fast forward button. not ideal if you are hands free.

Aug 25th
Reply

Boyama Online

Keep on trying! https://www.logobids.com/users/boyama

Aug 20th
Reply

Raymond

🤣🤦🏽‍♂️ zen priest

Jul 27th
Reply

Ralph Lawrence Perez

Having high inflation nowadays, even vegetables are too expensive. It is not a kind of poor people food. 😂

Jul 16th
Reply

Raymond

nothing quite as awful as recycled episodes... lame

Jul 7th
Reply

Raymond

she identifies as they/them...makes sense why she is so contradictory and unoriginal...

Jun 16th
Reply

mahsa safavi

fesenjon😍

Jun 10th
Reply

Big cat

Very useful

Jun 3rd
Reply

Yasamin

Thank you ! Great podcast ❤️❤️

May 22nd
Reply

Ali Safa

great

Apr 5th
Reply

Dana Pellegrino

I mean, she could've been right with the salad thing being equivalent to being poor. When I could barely afford to eat I used to just buy eggs and veggies and ate salads pretty much every day. Anyway, it was a great story 😂 and great episode too

Mar 15th
Reply
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