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IRL - Online Life Is Real Life
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IRL - Online Life Is Real Life

Author: Firefox, backed by Mozilla

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Our online life is real life. We walk, talk, work, LOL and even love on the Internet – but we don’t always treat it like real life. Host Manoush Zomorodi explores this disconnect with stories from the wilds of the Web, and gets to the bottom of online issues that affect us all. Whether it’s privacy breaches, closed platforms, hacking, fake news, or cyber bullying, we the people have the power to change the course of the Internet, keeping it ethical, safe, weird, and wonderful for everyone. IRL is an original podcast from Firefox, the tech company backed by Mozilla that believes privacy isn’t a policy. It’s a right.
34 Episodes
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The "Privacy Policy" Policy

The "Privacy Policy" Policy

2019-06-1700:26:471

Privacy policies: most apps and websites have them, buried away somewhere. These legal documents explain how the company collects, uses, and shares your personal data. But let's be honest, few of us actually read these things, right? And that passive acceptance says a lot about our complicated relationship with online privacy. In the Season 5 premiere of IRL, host Manoush Zomorodi speaks with Charlie Warzel, writer-at-large with the New York Times, about our complicated relationship with data and privacy — and the role privacy policies play in keeping things, well, confusing. You'll also hear from Parker and Lila, two young girls who realize how gaming and personal data intersect. Rowenna Fielding, a data protection expert, walks us through the most efficient ways to understand a privacy policy. Professor Lorrie Cranor explains how these policies have warped our understanding of consent. And privacy lawyer Jenny Afia explains why "privacy" is a base element of being human.
All the things we love on the internet — from websites that give us information to services that connect us — are made stronger when their creators come with different points of view. With this in mind, we asked ourselves and our guests: "What would the internet look like if it was built by mostly women?" Witchsy founders Kate Dwyer and Penelope Gazin start us off with a story about the stunt they had to pull to get their site launched — and counter the sexist attitudes they fought against along the way. Brenda Darden Wilkerson recalls her life in tech in the 80s and 90s and shares her experience leading AnitaB.org, an organization striving to get more women hired in tech. Coraline Ada Ehmke created the Contributor Covenant, a voluntary code of conduct being increasingly adopted by the open source community. She explains why she felt it necessary, and how it's been received; and Mighty Networks CEO Gina Bianchini rolls her eyes at being called a "lady CEO," and tells us why diversifying the boardroom is great for business and innovation.
Decentralize It

Decentralize It

2019-02-1800:25:098

Some people believe that decentralization is the inevitable future of the web. They believe that internet users will start to demand more privacy and authenticity of information online and that they’ll look to decentralized platforms to get those things. But would decentralization be as utopian as advocates say it could be? Host Manoush Zomorodi speaks to Eugen Rochko of Mastodon, an ad-free alternative to Twitter; Justin Hunter of Graphite docs, a decentralized alternative to GoogleDocs; Maria Bustillos who hopes to help eliminate fake news online through the Blockchain; David Irvine, the co-founder of MaidSafe who plans to make the centralized internet as we know it redundant; and Tom Simonite of WIRED, who comments on both the promise and also the pitfalls of decentralization. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla, maker of Firefox and always fighting for you. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
The Surveillance Economy

The Surveillance Economy

2019-02-0400:27:3911

In her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, Harvard Business School’s Shoshana Zuboff argues that tech companies — like Google and Facebook — collect so much personal data for profit, that they’re changing the fundamentals of our economy and way of life. And now these companies are learning to shape our behavior to better serve their business goals. Shoshana joins Manoush Zomorodi to explain what this all means for us. We then explore whether or not it’s time to end our relationship with corporate spies. OG advice columnist Dear Abby gives us some tips to start with. We chat with philosopher S. Matthew Liao. He asks if we have a moral duty to quit Facebook. Alice Marwick explains why most people won’t leave the social network. And journalist Nithin Coca tells us what it was like for him to quit both Facebook and Google. Spoiler alert: it wasn’t easy, but he has no regrets. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla, maker of Firefox and always fighting for you. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org.
What, if anything, should be banned from online media? And who should review violent and explicit content, in order to decide if it’s okay for the public? Thousands of people around the world are working long, difficult hours as content moderators in support of sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. They are guided by complex and shifting guidelines, and their work can sometimes lead to psychological trauma. But the practice of content moderation also raises questions about censorship and free expression online.
TL;DR

TL;DR

2019-01-0700:24:2510

TL;DR: We have access to more things to read than ever before. Too much, in fact. Our reading habits have shifted. We skim a lot. We look for full stories baked into headlines. Our eyes bounce around from one article to the next, and we try and fail to manage how many things we read at once. Some of us can no longer concentrate on a book—no matter how good it might be. Reading has changed. And we’re changing alongside it. With host Manoush Zomorodi, Derek Thompson at the Atlantic talks headlines; Ernie Smith from Tedium rails against our bad browser tab habits; librarian rock star Nancy Pearl makes the case for analog books; Beth Rogowsky discusses if audiobooks can replace reading; and Nate Weiner from Mozilla’s Pocket shows us one way we can manage our reading overload. Happy New Year — let’s get working on that “I will read more this year” resolution.IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
Your Password is the Worst

Your Password is the Worst

2018-12-1000:27:125

Look, we agree with you: passwords are the worst. But you know what else is the worst? Someone hacking your account, or big security breaches that expose your email, your credit card information, your government-issued identification number, and more. We should hold companies accountable for better security, but we also need to hold ourselves accountable for having good password hygiene. So let's tackle this once and for all. Hear from Buzzfeed's Mat Honan, who endured a brutal hack a few years ago when hackers exploited password-recovery tools; Mark Wilson from Fast Company, who wants to ban passwords altogether (though admits it's not the best idea); Masha Sedova of Elevate Security who says that, yes, security companies have failed us – but we have to use passwords anyway; and Matt Davey of 1Password, who offers a solution that Mozilla can get behind: use a password manager. A simple, game-changing tool that will help you take back control of your accounts, and secure yourself as best as you can.IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
Checking Out Online Shopping

Checking Out Online Shopping

2018-11-2600:29:351

When you shop, your data may be the most valuable thing for sale. This isn’t just true online — your data follows you into brick and mortar stores now as well. Manoush Zomorodi explores the hidden costs of shopping, online and off. Meet Meta Brown, a data scientist who unveils the information Amazon captures about you when you make an online purchase; Joseph Turow, who discusses how retailers are stripping us of our privacy; and Alana Semuels, who talks about becoming a hoarder with the advent of online shopping. Plus, learn about a college coffee shop where you can actually buy a drink with your data. (Is it worth it?)IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
Can ‘ethical tech’ be a thing? We think so. Season 4 of Mozilla’s IRL podcast will explore all the ways tech can have a more positive influence on people, communities, and societies at large. And, we’re delighted to welcome our new host Manoush Zomorodi, who will keep the season nerdy, human, and — importantly — fun, for all of us as we listen in.IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
The 2016 U.S. presidential election blew up our ideas about influence campaigns in the age of screens. Two years later, Veronica Belmont and Baratunde Thurston examine how the internet is changing our minds, our votes, and our democracies – all over the world.Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Scott Shane details the United States' long history with election meddling. Paris correspondent for the Washington Post, James McAuley, shines a light on how other countries are managing the changing dynamics of online political campaigns. And speculative fiction authors Malka Older and Genevieve Valentine describe what elections may look like in the future, with advances in technology. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org
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Comments (13)

Johanan John Grêat

No more IRL??? I miss it sooo much...

May 28th
Reply

John Great

Great show. No one ever asked if none of these password managers can be hacked though. Is this not a real threat?

Mar 18th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

interesting...troubling ... frustrating. Leaving FB has turned out to be much easier than anticipated. but leaving Google... I want to but how?

Mar 12th
Reply

REfan

It is broken cuz the social media devs allow for anonymity on their sites while they lack stringent censorship or ip bans for bullies. People who bully others are a prob too. It often is inadequate young adults bullying others, who are often kids. That should be illegal and made law as kids have committed suicide from cyber bullying. It's sick how many biased ppl there are out there but we can deter it with regulations on bullying and requirement of sites to do daily censorship of troll.profane. Hate comments. Try are aware and apartently don't care seeing how long it takes to get a hate comment string removed

Feb 11th
Reply

Debra Dukes

Absolutely agree definitely leave you Vulnerable and be told you don't know what you are talking about and there is nothing they can do.Then your life is put on hold I think it is disgusting so I'm glad that their are some site's are trying to do something and yes so think something should be done about it.I also like the name he called them and they should not wait.Great episode and very scary and hope that they can do something.

Jan 29th
Reply

MFORCE EXCEPTION

BY

Jan 22nd
Reply

MFORCE EXCEPTION

STAY PRO

Jan 22nd
Reply

MFORCE EXCEPTION

first i found your podcast on web : mooozilaaaaa now i found you on cast box

Jan 22nd
Reply

MFORCE EXCEPTION

your podcast is good and professional and i like the way you tell about personal experiences... please keep it going and please tell about yourself are you iranian ? WELL . I AM ! TALK PERSIAN 😎😍

Jan 22nd
Reply

Nick Lastname

So.... because Americans can't form their own opinions the internet must be censored to save democracy? Not something I was expecting to hear from Mozilla. I'll rephrase: data mining leads to targeted reception of specific ads/opinions/stories/etc. while purposefully avoiding contradictory information of the same type (i.e. ads/opinions/stories/etc.) to reinforce the recipients' previously held beliefs while simultaneously making it less likely they'll be exposed to opposing viewpoints. Therefore, the recipients are unable to make an informed decision because they don't have all the information. This is why the onus is on the recipient to seek out the information. If Twitterbook gives me an ad for Coca Cola but I want a Dr. Pepper, I'll drink a Dr. Pepper. And if so many people decide to drink Coke that it becomes impossible to find Dr. Pepper anymore, then I guess I'll have a glass of water. The choice is still mine regardless of what my screen says.

Oct 5th
Reply

Past Past

very well produced and interesting, highly recommended!

Mar 7th
Reply

Giovanni Mendez

nice

Feb 14th
Reply

Dcat

The Internet is not broken. The Internet lets people become "anonymous". Anonimity shows the true person. Therefore people are broken, not the Internet.

Feb 8th
Reply
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