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The Notorious B.I.G. is revered as the King of NY and one of the greatest rappers of all time. Angie Martinez spent five nights speaking with those inspired by and closest to Christopher Wallace during the final 18 months of his life. His final body of work was the impeccable double album, Life After Death - a succession of infectious hit records and impossibly poignant rhymes that soared from certified diamond to iconic. Hear the untold stories that changed the course of Hip-Hop forever. For more info: www.iconicrecords.com

9 Episodes
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Episode 8 - Last Day

Episode 8 - Last Day

2023-06-1958:19

It’s one thing to be a fan of the Notorious B.I.G. but an entirely different gift to have known Christopher Wallace. Whether he was a friend, label mate, mentor or peer, if Biggie was in your life in any capacity, you were blessed.While conducting these interviews, the toughest question we had to ask was “Do you remember your last conversation with Big?” What we received was a beautiful mix of shared memories from friends to Bad Boy staff. We begin the finale of this ode to B.I.G.’s last days with the producer of his song “Last Day.“See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
If ever there was a poll to inform which Life After Death song is the global favorite, there’s a strong chance that the winner would be "I Got A Story To Tell". Another writing masterclass; Big gave us action, juicy drama, character development, comedic wit all wrapped in grade A lyricism.On episode 7 “I Got A Story To Tell,” producer Buckwild discusses his classic collaboration while setting the table for a few of the best Biggie stories from Too Short, DJ Clark Kent, DJ Premier, Barron Claiborne, and of course Lil Cease.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
When rap aficionados pinpoint the performance that closed the case on who’s the best MC, it’s usually Big’s verse on “Notorious Thugs.” Never did anyone fathom a New York rapper borrowing the staccato and lullaby flow of Cleveland rap group Bone Thugs N Harmony then taking it to another level.On episode 6, Fat Joe tells that it was he who brokered the historic Bone and Biggie collab. Bone Thugs manager Steve Lobel joins us to confirm. Then Lil Cease and Layzie Bone revisit that epic studio session in California late 1996.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
While Life After Death is rich with vibrant singles like "Hypnotize" and "Mo Money Mo Problems", the album’s darkness is undeniable. A dominant theme is death whether by fictitious murders or Biggie prophesizing his own. The song that captures this best is “My Downfall.”On Episode 5 we have an ensemble of guests breakdown the brilliance of the descending track. "My Downfall"'s producer Nasheim Myrick makes another appearance to further illuminate Biggie’s crown. Then the man who loved Christopher Wallace like none other Lil Cease joins me for one of his realest interviews ever.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
The Life After Death song that’s had the most cultural impact is the indelible "Ten Crack Commandments". The 3 minute and 24 second track produced by DJ Premier was a Youtube tutorial before the Internet was a thing. Big’s black market advisory transcended the drug game and smartened up entrepreneurs from cold street corners to plush corner offices.We speak with the legendary Premo on making the iconic track. Rick Ross and Pusha T also join the convo to discuss how much Biggie influenced their coke rap careers. But first Kleptomaniac returns to tell us how street hustling bonded him and Big and eventually led to him hanging out with superstars like Nas and Tupac Shakur.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
No album can be deemed classic without a supreme first track. Life After Death is a perfect example. “Somebody’s Gotta Die” is a master class on cinematic storytelling. Producer Nasheim Myrick gives us a never before told Biggie story that may make Salt & Pepa shoop.The album’s initial track was only preceded by its author’s imaging, commandeered by world renowned photographers like Michael Lavine and Barron Claiborne. We speak with both on their portraits attached to B.I.G.’s legacy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
In New York City, there is no sitting on the throne without possessing a style that is as bright and flavorful as it is original. The Big Apple also loves a come up story. While the Notorious B.I.G. leveled up lyrically, his fashion climbed parallel. He ultimately became the face of Coogi sweaters and Jesus pendants. No song exemplified Big’s aspirational glow on global culture more than “Sky’s the Limit.”In episode 2, we break down the beauty of “Sky’s the Limit” with Bad Boy R&B group 112 and God’s Favorite DJ Clark Kent. But first we sit with the architects behind Big’s evolution to fashion icon. See, before Big Poppa wore Versace, he rocked pieces from Guy & Sherane Woods’ custom line 5001 Flavors. Just ask superstar stylist and former Bad Boy intern Mike B. He was there. When it comes to Biggie’s true playa aesthetic, these are his Day 1’s.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
For the Notorious B.I.G., 1995 was quite the year. Not only was the MC preparing to crush the sophomore jinx with his second album, he was in full campaign mode for rap’s King of New York title. Initially endorsed by the July cover of the #1 hip-hop magazine in the 1990's The Source, Big led the race with the year’s hottest street record being his controversial “Who Shot Ya?”In the premier episode of Iconic Records, we talk to “Who Shot Ya”’s producer and former Hitman Nasheim Myrick. Junior Mafia MC Klepto gives us a never before told story about which rapper the song was actually aimed at. Rap royalty Fat Joe even joins us to speak on his brotherhood with B.I.G.. But first, legendary hip-hop journalist Bonz Malone reflects on writing that historic cover story for The Source 27 years ago and being a dice roll away from signing Big before Puff.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Upcoming season of Iconic Records: Life After Death launching May 1st! www.iconicrecords.com for more info!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
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