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Impeachment: A Daily Podcast
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Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

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Understand the political twists, historical context, and legal stakes of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Each day, host Brian Lehrer, one of the country’s most respected audio journalists, brings you conversations with the country’s most important reporters and newsmakers as we try to make sense of it all, together.



Impeachment is produced by WNYC, home to other news-making podcasts like The Brian Lehrer Show, The Takeaway and New Yorker Radio Hour.
69 Episodes
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Where are we on impeachment today?After nearly 13 hours of debate and 11 attempts by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to secure documents and witnesses before the opening arguments begin, the rules of the Senate's impeachment trial have been approved along party lines. At the last minute, reportedly facing pressure from his caucus, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell changed certain key elements of his rules proposal; notably, that each side's 24-hour opening statements would be spread across three sessions instead of two, and that evidence from the House inquiry would be automatically entered as evidence unless the President's defense team objects. Before calling the Senate into recess just before 2 a.m., Chief Justice John Roberts, who many expected to remain as above-the-fray as possible, "admonished... in equal measure" both legal teams for addressing "the world's greatest deliberative body"  using language "not conducive to civil discourse." On today’s episode:Anita Kumar, White House correspondent and associate editor for POLITICO.
How Many Days in 24 Hours?

How Many Days in 24 Hours?

2020-01-2100:23:161

Where are we on impeachment today?The Senate returns today to hear debate and then vote on a set of rules that will govern the first phase of President Trump's impeachment trial. The rules package, unveiled by Sen. Maj. Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday night, would set a timeline of two 12-hour sessions for impeachment managers to make their case. Democrats balked at the rules package, saying that these extended sessions are designed to send the proceedings late into the night, where they're less likely to be watched by the public. Republicans say Democrats want to spread the sessions out across four days in order to better orchestrate a media spectacle of the trial. Senators themselves will not participate in the debate over the rules, as they are barred from speaking during the trial. The task falls to the House impeachment managers, and the President's legal defense team. Trump's team now reportedly includes the Republican members of Congress who were the most vocal and visible during the impeachment hearings in the House.  On today’s episode:Jeremy Stahl, senior editor at Slate.
Where are we on impeachment today?President Donald Trump's defense team has added two individuals who are no strangers to the limelight: Ken Starr, who acted as independent counsel during the Clinton impeachment, and Alan Dershowitz, a frequent FOX News legal commentator and Harvard law professor. The additions suggest that the President expects the trial to play out, not only in the Senate, but in the court of public opinion as well. Senate Republican John Cornyn of Texas said on CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday that Democrats are only now insisting on calling new witnesses because they rushed the process in the House and voted on the Articles of Impeachment without a compelling case. Tomorrow, Tuesday is the first day of the Senate Trial, during which the House's impeachment managers will present their before the full Senate, which will have the opportunity to pose questions through Chief Justice John Roberts, who will preside over the entire trial.  On today’s episode:Alana Abramson, congressional reporter for TIME
Chuck Schumer's Playbook

Chuck Schumer's Playbook

2020-01-1700:23:212

Where are we on impeachment today?Yesterday, House Democrats sent the articles of Impeachment to the Senate. Chief Justice John Roberts was sworn in, and he likewise swore in the 99 out of 100 Senators present. The trial to remove or acquit President Trump has officially begun, but stands in recess until this coming Tuesday, at 1 p.m. At that point, Senators will vote on the rules for the first phase, in which the House's impeachment managers will present their case, and answer Senators' questions, submitted through Roberts. The Republican majority is holding firm in its stance to resist the question of subpoenaing witnesses and documents until that phase has been complete.  On today’s episode:Burgess Everett, POLITICO congressional reporter
Where are we on impeachment today?Amid a documents release from the House Intelligence Committee of Lev Parnas's correspondences, the Soviet-born, now-indicted associate of Rudy Giuliani made a media tour to give his account of the Ukraine affair, in which he played a significant role. In interviews with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow, Parnas said that the high-level meetings he took in Ukraine were all done at Giuliani's direction, and with an understanding that he was acting as an emissary for President Trump. The Representatives selected by Nancy Pelosi and approved by the House marched the two articles of impeachment across the Capitol Rotunda to the Senate. With the baton officially passed, the future of these proceedings is now in the hands of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and the Republican majority.  On today’s episode:David Gergen, CNN senior political analyst, current professor at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and a former White House adviser to four presidents
Where are we on impeachment today?Today, the House will vote to approve House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's picks for impeachment managers, and send the articles to the Senate after a month-long stalemate over the form that the Senate trial will take. Pelosi chose seven Democrats, among them Intel Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY), to make the case for removing the President from office in Congress's upper house. Ukrainian businessman Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudy Giuliani under indictment for campaign finance violations, turned over a trove of documents, and his cell phone, to the House Intelligence Committee, which yesterday released some of them (PDFs: 1, 2). They shed light on the role played by Giuliani, and add some troubling details about the campaign to intimidate and oust former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. Parnas appears to have been in contact with people who were tracking the ambassador's movements.  On today’s episode:Julian Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University, CNN political analyst, co-host of the podcast Politics and Polls
Let Lev Speak

Let Lev Speak

2020-01-1400:23:10

Where are we on impeachment today?In a closed-door meeting with her caucus on Tuesday morning, Nancy Pelosi announced that a vote on impeachment managers would take place on Wednesday, although she did not name her picks for the role. The Russian GRU, a government intelligence agency, has apparently hacked into the Ukrainian energy company that Trump pushed President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate. It's not clear whether any documents were stolen, but the cybersecurity firm that unearthed the hack called the attempt, "successful." Giuliani associate Lev Parnas, under indictment for campaign finance violations, is willing and indeed eager to testify in the impeachment probe. Over the weekend, Parnas's lawyer turned over his cell phone and other devices and documents to the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.  On today’s episode:Quinta Jurecic, managing editor of Lawfare
Where are we on impeachment today?Tomorrow, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will hold her weekly meeting with Democratic representatives. There, she's expected to discuss her thinking around who will make the case for impeachment in the Senate. After a nearly month-long delay, Pelosi announced on Friday that she would be transmitting the articles of impeachment to the Senate some time this week. Senate Maj. Leader Mitch McConnell has not yet provided a draft of the rules under which the Senate trial will be run. His Democratic counterpart, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, is reportedly building his procedural arsenal, and is planning to hold numerous votes designed to push the Senate closer to calling witnesses in the trial.  On today’s episode:Heather Caygle, Congress reporter for POLITICO
Pelosi Under Pressure

Pelosi Under Pressure

2020-01-1000:17:261

Where are we on impeachment today?Amid speculation that the House would send the Articles of Impeachment to the Senate today after a weeks-long strategic delay, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that there would not be a vote on the matter this week. But pressure to move on the articles has been mounting. Republicans in the Senate have floated one measure that could circumvent the hold, and another dismissing the articles outright if the hold had continued. From her own caucus, some Senate Democrats have publicly urged the Speaker to allow the process to continue, while the four Senators running in the presidential primary expressed concern that the demanding Senate trial would pull them off the campaign trail at a pivotal moment ahead of the Iowa Caucuses.   On today’s episode:Mike DeBonis reports on congress and national politics for the Washington Post    Today's episode was guest-hosted by WNYC reporter Ilya Maritz, who co-hosts the Trump, Inc. podcast.
Where are we on impeachment today?Nancy Pelosi said she would transmit the Articles of Impeachment to the Senate "soon," with her colleagues reportedly saying they expect movement before the end of the week. This, after pressure and press clippings from Democrats in the Senate who said, in so many words: Let's get this show on the road. A spate of Republican senators have aligned behind Maj. Leader Mitch McConnell, saying they want to get the trial underway, and decide on critical questions, including whether to subpoena witnesses or documents, after an initial phase of questioning the impeachment managers Pelosi will send across the Capitol Rotunda present the case.  On today’s episode:Dahlia Lithwick covers courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast "Amicus"
Where are we on impeachment today?Three key swing-state Republicans — Susan Collins of Maine, Mitt Romney of Utah and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — have come out in support of Senate Maj. Leader Mitch McConnell's plan to hear arguments on the House's articles of impeachment before deciding on witnesses. That means that there are enough votes in the Senate to begin the process after weeks of delay. The hold came from Nancy Pelosi, who wanted assurances that the trial would be thorough and fair. McConnell has said that the Senate should avoid committing to a structure before they're given the chance to question impeachment managers sent by the House to make the Democrats' case.   On today’s episode: Nicholas Fandos, congressional reporter for the New York Times Today's episode is guest hosted by WNYC's Brigid Bergin
What's Bolton up To?

What's Bolton up To?

2020-01-0700:18:471

Where are we on impeachment today?John Bolton, who resigned as Trump's national security adviser in part over the Ukraine affair, said yesterday that he would testify in a Senate trial, if subpoenaed to do so. His announcement comes after he declined to voluntarily appear before the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives, where Democrats hoped to hear what he meant when he called the administration's activities, "whatever drug deal [Gordon] Sondland and [Mick] Mulvaney are cooking up." Bolton's announcement puts pressure on Senate Maj. Leader Mitch McConnell to issue the subpoena, a tack that the Kentucky Republican and ally of the White House had reportedly hoped to avoid in deference to a speedy trial. The House's articles of impeachment remain in the hands of Nancy Pelosi, who is demanding assurances that they will be fairly considered in the Senate before she allows the process to proceed. Trump's lawyers have reportedly settled on a strategy for the upcoming trial that draws heavily from the defense Bill Clinton's legal team mounted in 1999, which led to his acquittal a month later.  On today’s episode:Natasha Bertrand, national security correspondent for Politico
Iran and Impeachment

Iran and Impeachment

2020-01-0600:23:082

Where are we on impeachment today?Congress comes back from its holiday recess to the impeachment stalemate over what form the Senate trial will take. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she would not transmit the two Articles of Impeachment without assurances that the Senate's proceedings would be "fair." The rules of the Senate trial would likely impact Pelosi's choice of Impeachment Managers to make the House's case before the upper chamber. Republicans say the Speaker is trying to prolong the inquiry to hurt President Trump's re-election efforts. Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) has floated a rules-change proposal, in the name of expediency, to proceed with the Senate trial without Pelosi's blessing. Congress returns from the holiday in the wake of the assassination of an Iranian general. Analysts have questioned the timing of the strike, with some saying that the lack of a retaliatory or preemptive explanation suggests that the provocative killing was meant to derail the trial against the President.  On today’s episode:Susan Page, Washington Bureau Chief for USA Today
Prudence and Prejudice

Prudence and Prejudice

2019-12-3100:19:361

Where are we on impeachment today? Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer renewed his call for former national security adviser John Bolton and White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney to testify in the Senate impeachment trial after The New York Times published a new investigation into the White House's effort to withhold aid to Ukraine. Senators Schumer and McConnell remain in disagreement over the terms of the trial: While the Dems want to decide on witnesses before the trial begins, Senate Republicans have held off deciding on witnesses until after the House managers and the president present their cases. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she will not send over the articles of impeachment until she knows more about the details of the trial.  On today’s episode: Ramesh Ponnuru, senior editor for National Review, says the president has met "the four tests for impeachment" and should be removed from office.
Where are we on impeachment today? On Christmas Eve Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska became the first Republican Senator to say that impeachment should be more than a test of party loyalty. She told reporters she was "disturbed" by Senator Mitch McConnell's pledge to "coordinate" with the White House on the impeachment trial. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has not made any new moves to send over articles of impeachment to the Senate, but the war of the witnesses, and who will be called to testify, rages on. President Trump has come under fire after retweeting a post to his 68 million followers on Twitter that included a name linked to the alleged whistleblower. Today, a new New York Times investigation looks into how and why President Trump pursued the Ukraine aid freeze over the objections of his national security advisers.    On today’s episode: Jonathan Lemire, Associated Press White House reporter and political analyst for MSNBC and NBC News.
2019 Impeachment News Quiz

2019 Impeachment News Quiz

2019-12-2700:20:591

Today, a break from the breaking news. We tested local listeners on how closely they've been paying attention to the finer details of the impeachment probe into President Trump. How do you stack up? Listen to find out! 
You Be the Pundit

You Be the Pundit

2019-12-2400:17:143

On this special holiday episode, we turned the podcast over to you, and asked: How do you think the impeachment process should end, and how do you predict it will? 
Where are we on impeachment today? President Trump lashed out at Democrats on Twitter, accusing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of conducting the "most unfair trial" in the history of the U.S. Congress. Meanwhile, Pelosi says it's the Senate that's being unfair, and she won't send over impeachment articles until certain procedural changes are made (mostly having to do with what witnesses are called to testify). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he's not anxious to start a trial anyway, and claimed the House gains no leverage by “refraining from sending us something we do not want.” On today’s episode:Michael Moore, American documentary filmmaker and host of the new podcast Rumble
Where are we on impeachment today?As congress is gaveled into a two-week recess, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that his caucus was "at an impasse," with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, who is insisting on assurances of a "fair trial" in the Senate before officially passing the baton to Congress's upper chamber for the final leg of this process. The final step in the House is to elect "impeachment managers," who will act as prosecutors in the Senate trial. Former Republican Justin Amash, now a registered Independent who supported impeachment, is reportedly being considered for the role to put a non-partisan face on what has been a bitterly partisan process.  On today’s episode:Eliana Johnson, editor-in-chief of the Washington Free Beacon
Where are we on impeachment today?After almost 12 hours of debate, the House took the historic step of impeaching President Trump. Now, the spotlight turns to the Senate, where Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer have been posturing over the structure of the upcoming trial. McConnell wants a quick acquittal. Schumer wants to hear from the Administration witnesses who stonewalled the House's inquiry. But after last night's vote, Nancy Pelosi made a last-minute play, demanding a "fair trial," and declining to say when she would transmit the Articles of Impeachment to the Senate, casting the timeline into uncertainty. On today’s episode:David Leonhardt, op-ed columnist at The New York Times, co-host of  the podcast "The Argument"
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Comments (18)

Nonya Bizness

i call false equivalency. the dems level of desire for witnesses in the clinton impeachment versus the trump impeachment are apples and oranges, and not, as you say, a product of political expediency. the clinton impeachment senate had special prosecutor starr's ~massive~ investigation to work from, which included an enormous number of depositions from any and all witnesses, along with infamous reams of documents. in the trump case, the house was forced to do the investigation on their own, and were denied access to almost every single document and witness. so obviously, witnesses are a magnitude more essential now than before.

Jan 19th
Reply (1)

N Me

I'm thinking that when trump says to his sycophants that he needs a big tough guy event that segways into his rallies , a kickoff to his 2020 campaign, they think this Iranian general is the ticket. they could blow him up, surgically, with no collateral damage, and insto presto trump's next political ad shoots itself. how shortsighted...this one act has taken a divided Iran and unified them under 1 bloody ideology of America's destruction. way to go trump.

Jan 6th
Reply

Elizabeth Burns

Jesus of Nazareth was accused of blasphemy, not treason.

Dec 30th
Reply

Roy Chambers

yes

Dec 29th
Reply

Dm

This Is true Xmas cheer! “When this comes out...Ukraine will look like spilt milk“ Michael Moore.

Dec 23rd
Reply

daisy

she sounds rational but I don't trust it

Dec 22nd
Reply

Camilo r corrales

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Dec 14th
Reply

daisy

who knows what the truth is but this is seriously the craziest saga with really bad actors who keep acting bad

Dec 12th
Reply (1)

Mark Harrington

Ok...so does this mean Michael Isikoff is saying "nevermind" to his own book? Since apparently nothing in the Steele dossier is corroborated?

Dec 10th
Reply

jersey2777

just found this show and I must say that in the midst of severe division and ugliness that pervades us currently, this show presented a constitutional perspective that really adds to this conversation of impeachment. thanks and great work.

Nov 29th
Reply

Kevin Moore

Hilarious and expected that you only interview liberals. Can you get anymore biased??? #FakeNews #Trump2020 #AMERICAFirst #BuildTheWall #EndLiberalism

Nov 2nd
Reply (1)

Nonya Bizness

so team trump argues that presidential candidates are legally allowed to commit any and all crimes, up to and including murder, in order to get elected, as long as their campaign is successful, at which point they are immune to prosecution or even investigation.

Oct 27th
Reply (1)

Elizabeth Burns

Just say something for something else. Translate the Latin & have done with it.

Oct 22nd
Reply (1)
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