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In Machines We Trust

In Machines We Trust

Author: MIT Technology Review

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A podcast about the automation of everything. Host Jennifer Strong and the team at MIT Technology Review look at what it means to entrust artificial intelligence with our most sensitive decisions.


Algorithms decide who receives social services, goes to jail, gets into college, qualifies for loans, or lands a job. We also look to AI to read and interpret our emotions, determining whether we’re happy, sad, angry, distracted… or even a threat. Tech Review’s editors and reporters explore the impact of artificial intelligence on the way our future will work.

5 Episodes
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What happens when an algorithm gets it wrong? In the first of a four-part series on face ID, Jennifer Strong and the team at MIT Technology Review explore the arrest of a man who was falsely accused of a crime using facial recognition. The episode also starts to unpack the complexities of this technology and introduce some thorny questions about its use.   We meet:  Robert and Melissa Williams  Peter Fussey, University of Essex Hamid Khan, Stop LAPD Spying Coalition Credits: This episode was reported and produced by Jennifer Strong, Tate Ryan-Mosley and Emma Cillekens. We had help from Karen Hao and Benji Rosen. We’re edited by Michael Reilly and Gideon Lichfield. Our technical director is Jacob Gorski. Special thanks to Kyle Thomas Hemingway and Eric Mongeon.
Clearview AI has built one of the most comprehensive databases of people’s faces in the world. Your picture is probably in there (our host Jennifer Strong’s was). In part two of this four-part series on facial recognition, we meet the CEO of the controversial company who tells us our future is filled with face ID— regardless of whether it's regulated or not. We meet:  Hoan Ton-That, Clearview AI  Alexa Daniels-Shpall, Police Executive Research Forum  Credits:  This episode was reported and produced by Jennifer Strong, with Tate Ryan-Mosely and Emma Cillekens, with special thanks to Karen Hao and Benji Rosen. We’re edited by Michael Reilly and Gideon Lichfield. Our technical director is Jacob Gorski.
The use of facial recognition by police has come under a lot of scrutiny. In part three of our four-part series on face ID, host Jennifer Strong takes you to Sin City, which actually has one of America’s most buttoned-up policies on when cops can capture your likeness. She also finds out why celebrities like Woody Harrelson are playing a starring role in conversations about this technology.  We meet:  Albert Fox Cahn, Surveillance Technology Oversight Project Phil Mayor, ACLU Michigan Captain Dori Koren, Las Vegas Police  Assistant Chief Armando Aguilar, Miami Police  Credits:  This episode was reported and produced by Jennifer Strong, Tate Ryan-Mosley and Emma Cillekens. We had help from Benji Rosen and Karen Hao. We’re edited by Michael Reilly and Gideon Lichfield. Our technical director is Jacob Gorski.
Who Owns Your Face?

Who Owns Your Face?

2020-08-1220:31

Police have a history of using face ID to arrest protestors—something not lost on activists since the death of George Floyd. In the last of a four-part series on facial recognition, host Jennifer Strong explores the way forward for the technology and examines what policy might look like.  We meet: Artem Kuharenko, NTechLab Deborah Raji, AI Now Institute Toussaint Morrison, Musician, actor, and Black Lives Matter organizer Jameson Spivack, Center on Privacy & Technology  Credits: This episode was reported and produced by Jennifer Strong, Tate Ryan-Mosley, Emma Cillekens, and Karen Hao. We had help from Benji Rosen. We’re edited by Michael Reilly and Gideon Lichfield. Our technical director is Jacob Gorski.
Coming August 12th

Coming August 12th

2020-07-1103:481

Welcome to a podcast about the automation of everything. Host Jennifer Strong and MIT Technology Review’s editors explore what it means to entrust AI with our most sensitive decisions.
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