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In the Dark

Author: APM Reports

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Serial investigative journalism from APM Reports, with host Madeleine Baran and a team of reporters. Season 1 looked at the abduction of Jacob Wetterling in rural Minnesota and the accountability of sheriffs in solving crime. Season 2 examined the case of Curtis Flowers, who was tried six times for the same crime. Also, a special report on Covid-19 in the Mississippi Delta.
43 Episodes
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In Season 1 of our podcast, we reported that the Jacob Wetterling case was a botched investigation. Just yesterday, law enforcement acknowledged it too. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
Season One: The Trailer

Season One: The Trailer

2016-08-2903:47110

After he disappeared nearly 27 years ago, Jacob Wetterling's remains have been found. Why did it take so long? Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E1: The Crime

S1 E1: The Crime

2016-09-0735:30302

The abduction of Jacob Wetterling, which made parents more vigilant and led to the first national requirement that states track sex offenders via registries, took place before moonrise on a warm October night in 1989. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E2: The Circle

S1 E2: The Circle

2016-09-0739:10204

When Jacob Wetterling was taken, authorities launched what would turn into one of the largest searches for any missing person in the history of the United States. But that first night, law enforcement didn't cover all the basics. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E3: The One Who Got Away

S1 E3: The One Who Got Away

2016-09-1345:29157

The closest you can get to a conversation with Jacob Wetterling about his abduction is to talk to Jared Scheierl. Scheierl was walking home from an ice skating rink in Cold Spring in January 1989 when a man who turned out to be Danny Heinrich forced him into a car, assaulted him, and let him go, uttering some chilling parting words: "If they come close to finding out who I am, I'll find you and kill you." That was nine months before Jacob's abduction. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E4: The Circus

S1 E4: The Circus

2016-09-2037:17112

The Wetterling abduction story kept getting bigger as the case served as a conduit for public fear and grief. Capitalizing on a growing sense that pedophiles lurked in every shadow, the likes of Maury Povich and Geraldo Rivera joined the cause with sensational retellings of the crime and its consequences. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E5: Person of Interest

S1 E5: Person of Interest

2016-09-2748:10123

Dan Rassier now wishes he'd insisted that police search his family's St. Joseph farm top to bottom the night Jacob Wetterling was abducted. That way, they would have known there was nothing to find. And it would have been harder for them to come back 21 years later to search with backhoes and declare him a "person of interest" in the case. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E6: Stranger Danger

S1 E6: Stranger Danger

2016-10-0437:23110

In the 1970s and early '80s, missing children weren't considered a policing priority. You couldn't even enter missing child information into the FBI's national crime database. But that changed quickly. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E7: This Quiet Place

S1 E7: This Quiet Place

2016-10-1141:1298

Soon after the abduction and murder of Jacob Wetterling in 1989, Stearns County sheriff's investigators came face to face with his killer, Danny Heinrich, who would confess to the crime 27 years later. Then they let him go. It wasn't the first time that had happened in Stearns County. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
In November 2012, a police officer named Tom Decker was shot and killed in Cold Spring, Minn., after getting out of his car to check on a man who lived above a bar. The man was quickly arrested and held in the Stearns County jail. He was interrogated but then released without charges. The state crime bureau later ruled him out as a suspect. Investigators turned their focus to another man, Eric Thomes, who hanged himself before he could be charged with the crime. Nearly four years after the murder, Sheriff John Sanner has refused to close the case "because we're still hopeful that new information will come in," he said. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 E9: The Truth

S1 E9: The Truth

2016-10-2542:32107

When Danny Heinrich confessed in court on Sept. 6 to abducting and murdering Jacob Wetterling and assaulting Jared Scheierl 27 years ago, investigators declared that at last, the public had the truth. But despite Heinrich's excruciatingly detailed accounts, the truth remains elusive. Many questions remain unanswered. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
The sentencing of Danny Heinrich on Nov. 21, 2016, brought to a close the 27-year investigation into the abduction and murder of Jacob Wetterling. But it didn't end the story. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
Season Two: The Trailer

Season Two: The Trailer

2018-04-1602:3333

Curtis Flowers has been tried six times for the same crime. For 21 years, Flowers has maintained his innocence. He's won appeal after appeal, but every time, the prosecutor just tries the case again. What does the evidence reveal? And how can the justice system ignore the prosecutor's record and keep Flowers on death row? Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E1: July 16, 1996

S2 E1: July 16, 1996

2018-05-0143:10151

On the morning of July 16, 1996, someone walked into a furniture store in downtown Winona, Mississippi, and murdered four employees. Each was shot in the head. It was perhaps the most shocking crime the small town had ever seen. Investigators charged a man named Curtis Flowers with the murders. What followed was a two-decade legal odyssey in which Flowers was tried six times for the same crime. He remains on death row, though some people believe he's innocent. For the second season of In the Dark, we spent a year digging into the Flowers case. We found a town divided by race and a murder conviction supported by questionable evidence. And it all began that summer morning in 1996 with a horrifying crime scene that left investigators puzzled. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E2: The Route

S2 E2: The Route

2018-05-0153:3195

The case against Curtis Flowers relies heavily on three threads of evidence: the route he allegedly walked the morning of the murders, the gun that investigators believe he used, and the people he supposedly confessed to in jail. In this episode, we meet the witnesses who said they saw Flowers walking through downtown Winona, Mississippi, the morning of the murders. Some of their stories now waver on key details. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E3: The Gun

S2 E3: The Gun

2018-05-0849:1576

Investigators never found the gun used to kill four people at Tardy Furniture. Yet the gun, and the bullets matched to it, became a key piece of evidence against Curtis Flowers. In this episode, we examine the strange histories of the gun and the man who owned it. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E4: The Confessions

S2 E4: The Confessions

2018-05-1555:06101

Over the years, three inmates have claimed that Curtis Flowers confessed to them that he killed four people at the Tardy Furniture store. But they've all changed their stories at one time or another. In this episode, we investigate who's really telling the truth. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E5: Privilege

S2 E5: Privilege

2018-05-2250:3593

No witness has been more important to the prosecution's case against Curtis Flowers than Odell Hallmon. He testified in four trials that Flowers had confessed to him while the two men were in prison together. Hallmon has an astonishingly long criminal history that includes repeated charges for drug dealing, assault, and robbery. So how reliable is his testimony and did he receive anything in exchange for it? In this episode, we investigate the veracity of the prosecution's star witness. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E6: Punishment

S2 E6: Punishment

2018-05-2945:4874

Odell Hallmon, the state's key witness in the Curtis Flowers case, is serving three consecutive life sentences. We wondered what he might say now that there are no deals to cut, and he will spend the rest of his days in prison. Would he stick to his story that Flowers had confessed to the Tardy Furniture murders? We wrote him letters and sent him a friend request on Facebook. Weeks went by and we heard nothing. And then, one day, he wrote back. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
There's one critical aspect of the Curtis Flowers case that we haven't looked at yet -- the makeup of the juries. Each of the four times Flowers was convicted, the jury was all white or nearly all white. So we decided to look more closely at why so few black jurors had been selected. And it wasn't always happenstance. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
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Comments (473)

Pocket Glitter

Season 2, Episode 20 All the feels.... 🥰

Oct 15th
Reply

ID10339531

So good to listen to this. I was crying in happiness for him. Wish his mum was there. Did he get the recipes his mum was collecting for him? Has he cooked any?

Oct 6th
Reply

Quamon King

arrest the prosecutor

Sep 23rd
Reply

ID10339531

Isn’t it amazing that they lead investigator, who is accused of coercing and intimidating witnesses for their testimony, is the same one asking them directly if he did that. It’s the equivalent to an abused wife being asked by her abuser if he did in fact do that. There is reason why police want to interview the victim seperately. So they can speak freely, to a non-impartial person. Maybe, it should be on the judge, in his chambers, whom you hope is impartial, although in places like Mississippi I am suspicious, and asked them himself. ESP in cases like this. Or maybe there should be an impartial body created, for such things, since witness coercion seems to happen a lot

Sep 23rd
Reply

Mae Lee Arant

Doug Evans is, more than likely,a murderer-sending people to their deaths because their skin colored made them easy targets in a state where being black has always been a crime . Thank you for your tenacious drive for tryth.

Sep 21st
Reply

Tanika Williams

I'm enjoying your podcast and the fresh set of eyes you've placed on this case. It was clear to me that this prosecutor needed a win and was trying to save face for so many years. The Ronnie Long case was recently brought to my attention and I wonder if your investigative skills could uncover what went wrong. https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/28/us/ronnie-long-nc-wrongful-conviction-trnd/index.html

Sep 19th
Reply

ka jong venus Park

best piece of news I've heard this year. well done Madeline & Team!!

Sep 18th
Reply

roxicodone

I'm so effin happy for Curtis. I know his mama is certainly smiling down on him; how I wish she could've been here to share this on Earth. Fantastic journalism, APM!

Sep 9th
Reply

Edgar Rodriguez

finally his free!!👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾 true journalism like this is soo needed...how is that prosecutor still walking free?

Sep 7th
Reply

Data Solutions Experts

This podcast has people who are really funny talking about some really good restaurants. Definitely worth a listen. https://www.datasolutionsexperts.com

Sep 6th
Reply

Timothy Williams

Such a beautiful end to a horrible Journey. Top-notch journalism here.

Sep 5th
Reply

AnKa

Greatest journalism work I've ever faced. Heros.

Sep 5th
Reply

Linda Parker

I am late in listening to this but seriously about the man's 20 Year old missing son, the sheriff says, does it really matter now? Meaning does it matter what happened after all this time? Hell yes, that man's son is still missing! What if it were your child? That is horrible!

Jul 30th
Reply

Kymmjellybean

I cannot stand listening to this coach's voice.

Jun 12th
Reply

Kymmjellybean

Although the reporter conducting the phone interview has a pleasant enough voice, she sounds ridiculous on the phone as if she's never had a conversation with a human being on the phone before #smh

Jun 5th
Reply

Lorenzo B. Esparza

Give me a break! These Pedophiles are complaining that life is hard because they have to register as a set offender, especially this guy she interviewed. If he actually met up with the two under aged girls then what? He wouldn't have been sorry. What of the harm he would have caused...could have caused? They want their cake and eat it too. The message is...STAY AWAY FROM OUR KIDS!!!

Jun 1st
Reply

Lorenzo B. Esparza

Listen to this condescending heifer! She sounds like she been out of diapers for like 2 minutes and now she's the go to for solving crimes. Give me a break!

May 30th
Reply

Lorenzo B. Esparza

Listen to this Monday morning quarterback talk about how the police failed in this case. It's easy for someone to point the finger after the fact and say I would have this and that. I wonder if she still lives with mommy and daddy while believing unicorns exist.

May 30th
Reply

deborah cassidy

These religious folk are insane. I’m not surprised at how they think they are above the law. But I’m disgusted

Apr 30th
Reply

James Yoo

awesome, can't wait!

Apr 27th
Reply
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