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In the Dark

Author: APM Reports

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Serial investigative journalism from APM Reports, with host Madeleine Baran and a team of reporters. In Season 1, we looked at the abduction of Jacob Wetterling in rural Minnesota and the accountability of sheriffs in solving crime. In Season 2, we examined the case of Curtis Flowers, who has been tried six times for the same crime. He's won appeal after appeal, but every time, prosecutor Doug Evans just tries the case again.
35 Episodes
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S2 E18: The Recusal

S2 E18: The Recusal

2020-01-0800:18:2216

District Attorney Doug Evans has prosecuted Curtis Flowers for 23 years and six trials. Now he says he's done. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E17: Home

S2 E17: Home

2019-12-2200:42:5237

After almost 23 years, Curtis Flowers is no longer behind bars. For his family, it's a long-awaited reunion. But not everyone in Winona is happy. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E16: A Hearing

S2 E16: A Hearing

2019-12-1800:48:2637

After nearly 23 years locked up, Curtis Flowers has a chance to get out on bail -- if his lawyers can convince the judge to rule in his favor. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E15: Revelations

S2 E15: Revelations

2019-07-0200:56:5459

It's been 11 days since the U.S. Supreme Court threw out Curtis Flowers' conviction. But the story didn't end there. In recent days, there have been three other significant developments, including new details from a key witness, that may determine Flowers' fate. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E14: The Decision

S2 E14: The Decision

2019-06-2200:16:4530

On Friday, June 21, after months of deliberation, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its opinion in the Curtis Flowers case. In a 7-2 ruling, the justices threw out the conviction from his sixth trial, in 2010. The decision of what happens next -- whether to release Flowers or begin a seventh trial -- now lies with the same prosecutor who's pursued him from the beginning: Doug Evans. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E13: Oral Arguments

S2 E13: Oral Arguments

2019-03-2700:49:2149

After nearly nine years of appeals of his sixth trial, Curtis Flowers finally had his case argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. At issue was whether DA Doug Evans tried to keep African-Americans off the jury in the 2010 trial. Flowers wasn't at the Supreme Court -- he remains on death row in Mississippi -- but the In the Dark team was. This is what we saw. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E12: Before the Court

S2 E12: Before the Court

2019-03-1900:42:5749

We resume Season Two with the U.S. Supreme Court weighing Curtis Flowers' case. We preview oral arguments and delve into the allegations at the heart of the appeal: that Doug Evans tried to keep African-Americans off the jury in Flowers' sixth trial. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
Our second season spanned a year in Mississippi where we revealed misconduct, injustice and racial divide in the six trials of Curtis Flowers. The U.S. Supreme Court will now decide if the prosecutor racially discriminated in jury selection. In four new episodes starting March 19, we'll go into the courtroom for oral arguments, report the decision and examine the effect of the ruling. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
We answer your questions and report on a fire in Winona. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear Curtis Flowers' appeal. Now the justices will examine if District Attorney Doug Evans had a history of racial discrimination in jury selection. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S1 Update: The Wetterling File

S1 Update: The Wetterling File

2018-09-2100:28:5858

In Season 1 of our podcast, we reported that the Jacob Wetterling case was a botched investigation. Just yesterday, law enforcement acknowledged it too. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 Update: Back to Winona

S2 Update: Back to Winona

2018-09-1800:34:3444

Two months after the season ended, we return to Winona to see what has changed. Turns out, a lot. Curtis Flowers' mother has died. The whole town is talking about the case. Flowers' defense lawyers are including our findings in their legal filings to the Supreme Court. Citizens are trying to file bar complaints against the district attorney, Doug Evans. One man has gone into hiding, his personal safety threatened because he spoke to us. In this update episode, we look at what's happened in Winona since our last episode and what happens next with Curtis Flowers' case. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E11: The End

S2 E11: The End

2018-07-0300:36:3482

For the last episode of the season, we went to meet Jeffery Armstrong, who, a few years after Curtis Flowers first went to prison, found what might have been a key piece of evidence. What he found -- and where he found it -- offers hints that someone else may have committed the Tardy Furniture murders. Armstrong turned the evidence into the cops. And then, he says, it disappeared. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E10: Discovery

S2 E10: Discovery

2018-06-2601:04:5062

Prosecutors have always said that Curtis Flowers was the only serious suspect in the Tardy Furniture investigation. But we found a document showing that another man, Willie James Hemphill, had also been questioned just days after the murders. Who was he? Why was he questioned? When we finally found Hemphill, living in Indianapolis, he had some very surprising things to say about the case. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E9: Why Curtis?

S2 E9: Why Curtis?

2018-06-1900:57:2164

After re-examining the case, we'd found no direct evidence linking Curtis Flowers to the murders at Tardy Furniture. But we had one lingering question: How did Flowers become the main suspect? Why would investigators focus so much on Flowers based on so little evidence? In short, why Curtis? We decided to find out. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E8: The D.A.

S2 E8: The D.A.

2018-06-1201:02:1764

After investigating every aspect of the Curtis Flowers case, we were nearly ready to present what we'd found to District Attorney Doug Evans. But first we tried to learn all we could about him: his childhood, his years as a police officer and his record as district attorney. Then, finally, we met the man who's spent more than two decades trying to have Flowers executed. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
There's one critical aspect of the Curtis Flowers case that we haven't looked at yet -- the makeup of the juries. Each of the four times Flowers was convicted, the jury was all white or nearly all white. So we decided to look more closely at why so few black jurors had been selected. And it wasn't always happenstance. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E6: Punishment

S2 E6: Punishment

2018-05-2900:44:3468

Odell Hallmon, the state's key witness in the Curtis Flowers case, is serving three consecutive life sentences. We wondered what he might say now that there are no deals to cut, and he will spend the rest of his days in prison. Would he stick to his story that Flowers had confessed to the Tardy Furniture murders? We wrote him letters and sent him a friend request on Facebook. Weeks went by and we heard nothing. And then, one day, he wrote back. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E5: Privilege

S2 E5: Privilege

2018-05-2200:48:5786

No witness has been more important to the prosecution's case against Curtis Flowers than Odell Hallmon. He testified in four trials that Flowers had confessed to him while the two men were in prison together. Hallmon has an astonishingly long criminal history that includes repeated charges for drug dealing, assault, and robbery. So how reliable is his testimony and did he receive anything in exchange for it? In this episode, we investigate the veracity of the prosecution's star witness. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
S2 E4: The Confessions

S2 E4: The Confessions

2018-05-1500:53:3786

Over the years, three inmates have claimed that Curtis Flowers confessed to them that he killed four people at the Tardy Furniture store. But they've all changed their stories at one time or another. In this episode, we investigate who's really telling the truth. Support investigative journalism with a donation to In the Dark.
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Comments (442)

Pam Roberson Livingston

Are you kidding me? This went from investigating a death of a boy by a sex offender to “poor sex offenders can’t find a place to live”? Done with this podcast on episode 6!

Feb 20th
Reply

Pam Roberson Livingston

Are you kidding me? This went from investigating a death of a boy by a sex offender to “poor sex offenders can’t find a place to live”? Done with this podcast on episode 6!

Feb 20th
Reply

kittenkat

I'll never get tired of this

Feb 19th
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kittenkat

Oh my goodness this just makes me scared for my boyfriend even more

Feb 19th
Reply

Jane E

Gosh! Poor Marco!! Not. Though I agree that some people on the registry may not belong there, he definitely does. I don't feel sorry for him in the least.

Feb 3rd
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Mae Lee Arant

Mississippi is still burning.

Jan 29th
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Mae Lee Arant

It seems as though not one white person listened to the lies and the evidence presented other than the judge. This refusal to think about the information reflects how little justice matters;as long as someone pays, that's all that counts. Evan's was willing to kill an innocent man for his personal gain- this is where racism is so clearly evident.

Jan 29th
Reply

ABR

I bet that same woman adored Judge Loper back when he was accusing James Bibb of perjury and being all buddy-buddy with Doug Evans. But now, because he treated Flowers fairly by letting him out on bail and criticized Evans for not doing his job, suddenly he's "very liberal" and she hates him. 🙄

Jan 28th
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ABR

I won't pretend to know what it's like to go through through the hell Mr. Rigby has been through and I'm really trying to be compassionate... but dammit, he isn't making it easy. This man needs to find some other way to let out his anger and grief besides lashing out at an innocent journalist for being good at her job. I can't believe he even insulted her family, ugh.

Jan 28th
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Layla Williams

Doug Evans throwing a tantrum because you guys did an amount of work he couldn't imagine doing himself is embarrassing.

Jan 27th
Reply

Jared Whaley

it's terrible that this woman's daughter was killed... but a victory for Curtis isn't a defeat for justice for the four people who were killed. There's no substantial evidence that Curtis even had a motive to kill anyone, he doesn't have a violent history, and there's a mountain of evidence misconduct on the part of the prosecution (not just striking potential jurors based on race). Why can't we just acquit this presumably innocent man, and find the real killer? Also, I think it's clear that we need better regulation on the power granted to district attorneys and some degree of oversight on disbarment outside of bar associations... and I'm a conservative libertarian.

Jan 27th
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Dawn Shields

I'm so sickened to hear how this prosecutor has had such unethical conduct... he needs to go on trial!

Jan 27th
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Dawn Shields

did you say that both of the owners wives are dead? that seems odd... was there financial gain?

Jan 26th
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Jared Whaley

Respect to Kastriba, the detective who conducted the initial interview, for owning his mistake. One of the most frustrating things in this True Crime is listening to law enforcement claim that they were perfect; at least one person from Sterns' (spelling?) can admit that they're totally inept.

Jan 23rd
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Annie Parker

I love the questioning she does with the law enforcement about the effects it's had on the "person of interest's" life. This podcast in a whole is so far amazing! I'm glued to it. :)

Jan 21st
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Simon Folkard

Law enforcement involved in this case and plea deal should be ashamed of themselves. They are a disgrace. A truly brilliant podcast though.

Jan 14th
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Nancy Doughty

are there anymore seasons coming?

Jan 14th
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Simon Folkard

I must say despite being an unbelievably tragic case, with appalling investigative errors and sloppiness, this podcast is an excellent example of professional investigative reporting. Hands down one of the best podcasts i have heard.

Jan 13th
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Simon Folkard

What a disgrace these investigators were, i would be utterly ashamed if it were me.

Jan 13th
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Brian Maragos

Let my man LIVE! Either way, 23 years, he's not a threat to anyone. Another prison stint does nothing for anyone other than making some old white folks happy. You're not protecting or saving anyone. If I was the father of a victim here, I'd want the TRUTH and the right man served justice, not justice for the sake of justice.

Jan 9th
Reply (1)
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