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DISCLAIMER: Before diving headfirst into this episode, it is recommended that you go back and listen to the episodes that we dedicated solely to 1984 and 1991. But hey, if you want to be confused, and listen to this episode first, by all means, you do you. After reading the title of this episode, you might be thinking "hey I thought this was a music podcast", and you are correct, it most certainly is. Truth be told music in the mid-80s/early 90s was on fire, and there is no denying that. You could even go as far as to say that music was BULGING with talent and hits. See what I did there? Yes, that's right, Slash's favorite skinny jeans weren't the only thing with a big ol' bulge back in the day. With so much talent packed into just a few short years in the music industry, it was suggested by our listeners that we do a little comparison between the two, to see who we thought should come out on top. The lists of albums that came out during these two time periods is something truly to be wreckoned with, and the fact that we had to choose one over the other made us (Russ and Kyle) quite sad. Michelle didn't seem to care all that much, and as you'll come to find out, she has her a tribe of her own out there somewhere, so it is what it is. So what do you guys think? Which bulge was better? You might just come to realize that bigger isn't necesarily what you should be concerend with, and that longevity could very well be the key to it all. Come take another ride down the greatest musical rabbit hole out there, and see if you can come away with a clear cut winner. it's season 6, episode 2 of your favorite record store employee's, tattoo artist's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
AND WE'RE BACK! Man, that seemed like the longest between-season break ever, but lucky for you, we're back and better than ever. This season (season 6 a.k.a season 3 or 4 if you ask Michelle) is going to be another killer ride. We're starting this one off strong with our critically acclaimed album review series that you've all mostly grown to love.This time it's Kyle who went the extra mile and plugged us in with something that many of you might not have tuned into before hearing this. We all know of The Weeknd, I mean how could you not? He's been in the musical air supply for quite some time now, but what you hear now and where it all began are wildly different. The Weeknd was releasing music long before he had a major label record deal, and many of those projects are what put him on the map to begin with. Considered to be his first major-label release, Kiss Land turned it up a notch when it came to production, writing, art direction, and the overall concept of a project. Working with new producers and refusing to allow himself to be boxed into a specific sound and style. He even chose an album title that he thought would initially throw his fans off when they learned about its upcoming release. The Weeknd is no stranger when it comes to putting together a good concept album, and Kiss Land is no different. Meant to represent the trials and tribulations of life on the road, Kiss Land is full of sexual obsession, betrayal, addiction, and big-ticket trust issues and it's a weirdly exhilarating experience, that isn't for the faint of heart. Initially met with generally positive reviews, Kiss Land would debut at number two on the US Billboard 200 with 95,000 copies sold in its first week, and would go on to be certified gold by 2019. That may seem underwhelming compared to the numbers that he currently does, but you have to remember that this is considered to be his "debut album", and reaching number 2 on the Billboard 200 with your first major-label offering is nothing short of impressive.Okay enough of the small talk, Kyle is telling me to tell you all that I should just let the album speak for itself, so that's what I am going to do. It's season 6, episode 1 of Amber Heard's legal team's, personal assistant's dog walker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Dumpster Fyre

Dumpster Fyre

2022-04-1801:03:24

DISCLAIMER: This episode contains potential spoilers that involve two separate documentaries about the events that unfolded at a particular music festival (that never actually happened). It is advised that you go and check out "Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened" on Netflix and "Fyre Fraud" on Hulu. By doing so, it will loop you into this entire episode so you're not sitting there confused like Michelle is half of the time.Somehow, someway, and still unbeknownst to Michelle, we've made it through 5 whole seasons of this podcast. We say thank you A LOT, but we really truly mean it. Without you guys, this podcast would just be three music nerds arguing about random music shit while drinking in a dimly but colorfully lit basement with one of the most extensive record collections you've ever seen. You guys are the reason we've been able to take this show to the next level, and for that, we will be forever grateful.While we're on the subject of being grateful, we imagine that those who attended the biggest music festival farce in history are also probably forever grateful that they made it out of that whole ordeal alive. Calling it a perpetual dumpster fire would be putting it lightly, and would never really do the events that actually unfolded before everyone's eyes, any real justice. A story that when told, seems like that of a mockumentary of sorts. Perhaps the best mockumentary you could ever imagine watching, but unfortunately for literally everyone involved "The Fyre Festival" wasn't part of any fake documentary for everyone to mock. It was a very real idea, that had very real consequences.What do you get when you mix a fraudster with the right connections, a lot of money that belongs to other people, and an idea that would (in reality) take years to actually come to fruition?The brainchild of master swindler and self-proclaimed "entrepreneur" Billy McFarland, The Fyre Festival was supposed to be the world's most elite and luxurious music festival that anyone had ever seen. Set to take place in the Bahamas, The Fyre Festival was supposed to have it all and then some, but the events that would unfold would tell a very, very different story.This week we're talking about the biggest music festival dumpster fyre of all time, and it's a doozie if we've ever heard of one. A music festival with no actual music? Check. FEMA tents sold as private luxury villas? Check. No electricity or running water? Check. Cheese sandwiches instead of the gourmet food you were promised? Check. Continuing to defraud the same people who put their money and trust into you? Check. We watched all hell break loose, and if you're listening to this, chances are you also watched all hell break loose at the greatest but also the worst music festival that never was.This leaves us with one lingering question. Just how far would you go to make sure that everyone had clean drinking water? It's the season 5 finale of Billy McFarland's cell mate's ex-wife's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
From time to time here at Infectious Groove, we run across a particular artist or group that puts so much time and effort into a project that you can't help but fall in love with it. When time and effort are a top priority it becomes obvious just how far a carefully crafted album can take you. Couple that with mastering the art of live performance, and you have an undeniable package that most artists only dream of. These guys might have cut their teeth in NYC, but what you're hearing here doesn't sound like anything else coming out of the empire state. The Lone Bellow put the pedal to the metal when it came to putting together their sophomore effort "Then Came The Morning". A carefully crafted, and well thought out project that represents not only who The Lone Bellow are, but also the direction in which they're headed. A continuation perhaps, of the sound we've come to know from their first record, but with subtle differences in production due to their working with Aaron Dessner. Even with the changes in production, make no mistake as this is still very much an album that is owned entirely by The Lone Bellow, and boy do they put in the work to let you know it. Each song has a way of unfolding itself around the voices of Zach, Kanene, and Brian. It's hard not to get lost in the melodic flow and gracious harmonies that appear throughout this project and the way that each of these three accompany one another, yet hold their own entirely is something that simply cannot be explained and is better left to be deciphered by ear. This album is packed with both simplicity and sophistication, with matched undertones of soulful lonliness with a bit of sorrow sprinkled throughout. To be completely honest, we could go on forever about this album but when all is said and done, you just have to listen to it to understand. So hey, why don't you do just that and join us as we listen and dig into one hell of an album that more people should absolutely be aware of. It's season 5, episode 14 of your last Uber Eats driver's mother-in-law's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When it comes to a song, the only person that truly knows exactly what the song is about is the songwriter themselves, but that never stops us from not only filling in our own lyrics, but also trying to wholeheartedly decipher the songs meaning all together. We try, we try again, and we often fail. It's okay, we're going to keep this one short and sweet so you can get back to attempting to sing along to that Pearl Jam song in rush hour traffic, and you know damn well you have no idea what Eddie is saying. Sometimes we take that failure to a new level and use a specific song that we think means one thing but actually means another as lets say, our wedding song (oops!). A mistake that is easily made, but not as easily forgotten. In fact, some of the most well-known songs that have been in our musical air supply for what seems like forever are about something completely different than you've been thinking. If you've made it this far into the description, chances are you've already thought of a couple of songs that you once thought meant something much different than what was intended. This week we dig into that exact thing. From lyrics we've butchered over the years, to figuring out what specific songs are actually about. It turns out that one Ben Folds song you all know so well isn't actually about a Brick after all. It's season 5, episode 13 of Michelle's personal rap slang translator's favorite music podcast. This ones for you Spaghetti Hands! LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's that time again where we let you the listener choose an album, we listen, and then we tell you what we think. Honestly, this has become one of our favorite parts of the show. More often than not, we end up listening to something we otherwise might have passed up, and sometimes Michelle even finds something new to put into her rotation (which is a win-win for everyone).The eighties were a special time in music history, and we've talked about this before when we covered 1984 pretty extensively a few episodes back. Sure, 1984 was lit (I think we can all agree on that), but the trend continued on for quite a while. By the time 1987 rolled around, things within the industry were starting to shift. You might think that this would make for a rather difficult time to try and leave your mark on the world with a debut album, but singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Sananda Francesco Maitreya formerly known as Terence Trent D'Arby thought otherwise. In the summer of 1987, "Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby" was unleashed upon the world, and almost immediately was met with critical acclaim. This was D'Arby's debut album, and he wasn't about to leave anything off of the table when it came to letting the masses know what he was all about. The album almost immediately hit #1 in the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. Worldwide, the album sold a million copies within the first three days of going on sale, and would eventually become a hit in the US as well, though they were a bit slower to catch on. Nearly every single that was released spent at least some time on one music chart or another. The album would reach platinum sales status in several countries, with it eventually going 5x platinum in the UK. It would appear that Sananda knew what he was doing when it came to putting together a debut project. The album would go on to be nominated for several different awards, and would eventually take home the Grammy for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance in 1988. What a way to introduce yourself to the industry. Join us as we time travel a bit and dig into one hell of a debut album, by an extremely talented artist. It's season 5, episode 12 of what should now be your favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If it seems like the music industry is more crowded than ever, and that's because when it comes down to it, compared to other times throughout music history, it really is. Much of this is due to how we consume music now (thanks streaming platforms), or how the industry's labels no longer have a stranglehold on who and what we all hear (thanks Obama, I mean the internet). It would appear that it's easier than ever to get your music out there if you're an artist because of how diluted the industry currently is, but that's not always the case. We're sure you've run across an artist or band that you immediatly thought should have been way further up the musical totem pole than they were. It's often hard to understand how someone who is so talented could remain otherwise unoticed in an industry full of people who severely lack any sort of musical talent in general, but have no problem reeling your kids in with catchy TikTok songs.Truth be told, there are a million and one reasons why you have to constantly explain to people around you who your favorite artist is. This week we attempt to unpack why some make it to the top, and some that are equally or even more talented fall by the wayside. While in some instances it's self imposed for all kinds of reasons (mainly creative freedom) that is mostly not the case. The music industry works in myseterious ways, and while your success in the industry was once based on a hell of a lot of hard work and a bit of luck, things are a little bit different now.What do you guys think about this? Do you find yourselves having to explain who your favorite artists are to others? Let's chat! Find us on the interwebs, and tell us what you think! We can be the next in line for who you have to explain your favorite artists to. It's season 5, episode 11 of your favorite mall cop's mistress' favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
From time to time, a new album comes along and becomes so popular that it almost forces itself into the culture whether they like it or not. It's almost like it becomes part of our air supply and no matter where you turn, hearing it, is unavoidable. I know a million and one albums probably come to mind when thinking about it, and this particular album is no different.Some Nights is the second full album offered up by American pop rock group Fun. After freshly landing a new record deal with Fueled By Ramen, the band began the nine-month process of recording "Some Nights". Initially met with critical reception, and mixed reviews but that didn't stop the singles from the album from ending up everywhere. Picked up and covered by the wildly popular television show Glee, "We Are Young" would start a trail of fire that wouldn't fizzle out for quite some time."We Are Young" would then find its way into a brand new Chevrolet commercial that aired for the first time during Super Bowl XLVI, which lead to a level of exposure only a few musical acts ever get to witness for themselves. The song would also be performed at the MTV Movie Awards on June 4, 2012.Not only is "Some Nights" brilliantly written, but it's also brilliantly performed. Lead Singer Nate Ruess very much has become synonymous with the sound that "Fun." has, and the band itself wouldn't be the same without him. Whether or not the type of music they make is "your thing", you simply cannot deny the power that this album wields. At one point, you couldn't turn on your local radio station without hearing three or four songs off of this album."We Are Young" topped the US Billboard Hot 100 for six weeks and Alternative Songs for two weeks, with over six million digital downloads. The title track was commissioned as the second single and has reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, selling 6.8 million digital downloads as well as becoming their second No. 1 on Alternative Songs. The band later would go on to win the Grammy Award for Best New Artist, and "We Are Young" won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year. Fun received four other Grammy nominations: two for "We Are Young" and two for the album itself. To say that this album was a commercial success would be putting it lightly. Join us as we again take a gander at an album many of you may not have ever listened to all the way through, but by the time we're done there is going to be a good chance that you'll want to. It's season 5, episode 10 of Nate Reuss' pet spider monkey's exercise coach's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Disclaimer: This is a two-part episode, and it is recommended that you go back and start with part one before diving into this episode. When talking about the chronological history of music and its importance, more often than not a few years, in particular, will come up. Though all music history and the timeline overall are extremely important there are a few periods that absolutely stand out and outshine the rest.1984 is one of those years.You may be thinking to yourself, "well yeah, but there are a ton of different times in music how can you just focus on one in particular?" Well, the short answer is, we absolutely agree, but in order to prevent us from joining the likes of Joe Rogan and hoping you'll listen to 3-hour episodes of our podcast, we have to pick and choose to focus on certain things. Furthermore, more often than not topics like these that we focus on are brought to us by you, the listener (which is the case here).With that being said, 1984 was such a monster year in music that we've had to break this episode into two parts, similar to how we handled our discussion about 1991. I said we'd continue trucking along into this episode, and that's exactly what we're doing this week. This is part two of us taking it all the way back to 1984.To some of you, 1984 might have been the year you graduated high school, the year you were born, or the year you trusted that fart and shouldn't have. To others, this is one of the most powerhouse years that the music industry has had to offer us, and with good reason. Instead of spoiling this entire episode by listing off what we talked about, how about you just go listen so that I can keep my internship. It's season 5, episode 9 of Matt Pinfield's tortoise sitter's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When talking about the chronological history of music and its importance, more often than not a few years, in particular, will come up. Though all music history and the timeline overall are extremely important there are a few periods that absolutely stand out and outshine the rest.1984 is one of those years.You may be thinking to yourself, "well yeah, but there are a ton of different times in music how can you just focus on one in particular?" Well, the short answer is, we absolutely agree, but in order to prevent us from joining the likes of Joe Rogan and hoping you'll listen to 3-hour episodes of our podcast, we have to pick and choose to focus on certain things. Furthermore, more often than not topics like these that we focus on are brought to us by you, the listener (which is the case here).With that being said, 1984 was such a monster year in music that we've had to break this episode into two parts, similar to how we handled our discussion about 1991. So this week we're diving headfirst into Part 1 and will continue trucking along into Part 2 next week.To some of you, 1984 might have been the year you graduated high school, the year you were born, or the year you trusted that fart and shouldn't have. To others, this is one of the most powerhouse years that the music industry has had to offer us, and with good reason. Instead of spoiling this entire episode by listing off what we talked about, how about you just go listen so that I can keep my internship. It's season 5, episode 8 of Kurt Loder's cat sitter's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When you hear the name Kanye West, a million different people are bound to have a million different thoughts and opinions. Kanye is no stranger to controversy and being in the media headlines, and though that is where he currently is hanging out (and where he often finds himself, whether he likes it or not), this episode is about so much more than that—in fact, this episode has nothing to do with the Kanye you're hearing about today. Let's take it back a few years, and start from there. In 2009, Kanye began recording what would eventually become My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy during a self-imposed exile in Hawaii. Starting with such album titles as "Good Ass Job" and "Dark Twisted Fantasy", but after some back and forth he ultimately decided on the title we've come to know today. During the time of creating this album, Kanye spent around three million dollars recording the album, making it one of the most expensive albums ever made at the time. Commissioning George Condo for the album artwork, hosting an array of different guest producers, and lining up some monster artists for features on the album, it would appear that Kanye had a clear vision for what he wanted the album to become. It turns out that all of the time, money, and effort would pay off in the long run. My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy hit number 1 on the Billboard 200 and sold 496,000 copies in its first week. The album ultimately spent 115 weeks on the Billboard 200, and by July 2013, it had sold 1,351,000 copies in the US. By June 2011, the album was the second best-selling digital rap album ever, selling 483,000 digital copies. By November 23, 2020, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy would go on to be certified triple platinum by the RIAA for three million shipments in the US, and later that same year, it was reported that the album had been played one billion times on Spotify alone. To say that this album was a success would be a severe understatement, and no matter your thoughts on Kanye himself, you simply cannot deny the raw talent the guy possesses. His art, whether it be music, fashion, or pretty much anything he puts his mind to will continue to push boundaries and will be around for the foreseeable future, there is no denying that. So join us as we take a dive into the only album that Kyle has rated a 9 so far (that has to be good for something). It's season 5, episode 7 of Harvey Levin's personal tailor's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: This episode contains spoilers. If you have not seen "That Thing You Do!" it is recommended that you check out the movie before heading into this episode. If you don't care, then by all means carry on my wayward son.It's not often we dive into movies, and usually, when we do it's because they directly relate to music, or we simply just enjoy the film itself—or both, well yeah pretty much always both, haha. That being said, this is another one of those episodes so let's dig in. This time we're taking it back to 1996, with Tom Hanks not only sitting in the director's chair but also starring in the hit comedy "That Thing You Do!". The film is set in the 1960s and tells the story of the rise and fall of the fictional "one-hit wonder" pop band The Oneders (Wonders). Though this is a fictional story about the fictional band the one hit the band had in the movie would see actual success in real life, and would go on to be nominated for not only an Academy Award but also a Golden Globe for "Best Original Song".The movie tells the origin story of the band itself, and then also focuses on all of the trials and tribulations that fame brings. Something that pretty much anyone in the music industry can most certainly relate to. This film could absolutely serve as a bio-pic for (insert any old band here), and it's rather disheartening to see that very little has changed in the music business as I sit here today typing this some 60+ years later. So what happens to the band, and what do we think about this cult classic? Maybe you're wondering if this film sells the time period well, or if Tom Hanks is any good a directing? Maybe not. Well we're certain you'd like to know (at least something), but we have to keep the lights on around here, so really honestly the only way for you to find out is to tune in and immersive yourselves into this not too deep, yet not so shallow dive into a film we think everyone should see at least once. It's season 5, episode 6, and my dog ate the last part of this description. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If you're not familiar with the name Kelly Clarkson, there is a large chance that you either live in a cave somewhere or possibly deep in the foothills of West Virginia. For the rest of you, hearing that name probably makes you think one of a few things. If I had to guess, your first thought was when Steve Carell was having his body waxed in that scene from The 40 Year Old Virgin, and yells out her name as a defense mechanism to deal with the pain. Beyond that, she's also very well known for winning the first season of American Idol, all the way back in 2002. Truthfully, now some 20 years later, Kelly Clarkson has become so much more than a name from a funny scene in a movie, or the winner from a very washed up and played out American tv show. For starters, she's sold more than 25 million albums and 45 million singles worldwide. She has 11 top-ten singles in the US, and nine top-ten singles in the UK, Canada, and Australia. She also became the first artist in history to top each of Billboard's pop, adult contemporary, adult pop, country, and dance charts. She's worked her way on to multiple tv shows and ended up hosting her own talk show starting in 2019, appropriately titled "The Kelly Clarkson Show". To say that she's had a successful career in the industry would be a real understatement, but there has been a lot that has happened behind the scenes that many weren't aware of until she released her latest studio album, Meaning of Life. For the first time in her career, she was allowed to be herself and she did just that. She seemingly exploded into being allowed to finally be the artist that she had always wanted to be and we couldn't be more pleased. You'd be hard-pressed to find better work in her catalog because she just lets it all loose. A final farewell perhaps to an industry/label that not only made her but held her back as well. Join us as we dig into this masterfully orchestrated album, and see if you can guess ahead of time how much Michelle likes this album more than she does Pet Sounds. It's season 5, episode 5 of Kelly Clarkson's personal assistant's, makeup artist's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
From time to time our episodes aren't planned ahead of time, and the ideas pop up from things that might happen in our daily lives. This is one of those episodes."Grampa Kyle" seemed to have blown a musical gasket a few weeks back when he heard the new single from one of his favorite rappers. After a fury of messages, examples of old videos, and a bunch of gibberish sounding like an old man that just realized Neil Young had his music pulled from Spotify (which was the only reason he had his Grandson sign him up to begin with). Russ immediately was like okay this is going to be an episode, and well hey would ya look at that—here we are. Genre hopping in the music industry is certainly nothing new, and some would say it's more common than ever nowadays. Sometimes it happens right before your ears, and you don't even realize it right away. Some artists even take the transition head-on and talk about it in their songs. It seems like those that have the biggest issues with artists hopping around and experimenting with other genres are the die-hard fans that just can't imagine their favorite band or artist sounding any different than what they've become accustomed to, and though that's totally understandable—it's unrealistic if you're looking at them as an actual artist that needs to express themselves and experiment with different mediums. In some cases, an artist will use whatever persona the industry has given them to make them a success and once they reach that pinnacle, they do a 180 and take their true fans with them on quite an adventurous trip. On the other hand, there are artists that reach that pinnacle of their career, and they see that the checks that are cashing for the other guys are much bigger so they make a transition for financial gain hoping they can fit right in on the other side and make it rain. There are of course a myriad of examples we could list here, but then what reason would you have to listen to the show? Besides wanting to hear our beautiful voices of course. I'm willing to bet, as you've been reading this, more than one name has come to mind—because everyone knows of someone who fits into this category. Now, come join us as we discuss this whole situation and see if we can get "Grandpa Kyle" to take a nap so he'll settle down. It's season 5, episode 4 of Daniel Ek's personal driver's (who he just had to let go) favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Well, we've made it around the album review circle again, and we are once again throwing it off to one of our loyal listeners. This week, Mike from Chicago (better known as Chicago Mike) caught us all off guard with something we'd never heard before. Hell, this might have even been something we didn't even know existed until now. It's always fascinating when you thought you were pretty familiar with a band and it turns out you were really only aware of the latter half of their career. As you already know if you've read the title of this episode, I am referring to the Goo Goo Dolls. Yes, we ALL know who they are, because well they were part of the music air supply in the late 90s, early 2000s. To say that they ended up making it big would be quite an understatement. But what you may not know is, they started off on a very, very different playing field within the industry, and for those that are unaware of this, it may come as quite a shock. Typically when you hear Goo Goo Dolls, you're hearing one of their wildly popular adult contemporary rock hits like "Iris", or "Slide" while you're sitting in your local doctor's office nervously awaiting your annual colonoscopy appointment, but what you're hearing there while clinching your cheeks in anticipation is very, very far from where the band began.To be completely honest here, we initially thought 'Superstar Car Wash" was where the band did begin only to find out a short time later that this is in fact their fourth studio album. Minds. Blown.Honestly, if you've never heard this album, you should, just based on how insanely different it is from what you think of when you think Goo Goo Dolls. I'm going to stop before I give away any spoilers (I just got this internship to finally pay me, and I'm not giving that up). Just go listen. It's season 5, episode 3, of Aaron Rodgers' personal assistant's dog's favorite podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Okay, well more than one thing remains clear and I am going to start this on a positive note. I'm really trying to get hired this season, or at least turn my unpaid internship into a paid one, so maybe starting this off on a positive note will help that. First things first, and though this has been said a myriad of times already, we will never stop saying it. THANK YOU. Without all of you, we wouldn't be diving headfirst into season 5 (it's actually crazy to even say that out loud honestly). So yes, the first thing that remains clear is that you all certainly know how to show us a massive amount of support, and for that, we are eternally thankful.Now that we've gotten that out of the way, we can address the elephant in the room. Why in 2022 are we still having to talk about and discuss all of the many ways that artists in the music industry are taken advantage of? It's truly mind-boggling to at least 2 out of the 3 of us sitting here. The cat and mouse game that the music industry is, continues to evolve as times change. Stories of your favorite artists being taken advantage of by the industry are far from a new tale. Most recently T-Pain (yes that T-Pain, the guy who can actually sing in real life without Autotune) came out and posted some rather disheartening figures showing how artists are being paid by streaming services. If you haven't seen the photo, just take our word for it, it's not nearly enough in any way shape, or form and you probably won't be that surprised—which is also sad. As the industry continues to evolve and gobble up each and every way an artist has to create a reliable revenue stream, it leaves us wondering what's next? If you're being professionally pigeonholed, how on earth are you supposed to make a living doing what you love to do? Join us as we dig back into something that keeps on coming back up. It's season 5, episode 2 of your favorite independent recording artist's, personal assistant's, dog walker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Disclaimer: Yes, you are correct this is in fact a double-disc/triple LP album, but Russ has decided to focus on the latter half of this offering because let's be honest here, the first half absolutely serves a "greatest hits" package of sorts. So this review is specifically focusing on everything from "Scream" onward otherwise known as HIStory Continues. Now let's get to it!It's not every day that you can say your podcast has been fortunate enough to see a 5th season, and frankly, it's rather mind-boggling to us that we're still going strong, and we're grateful for every single one of you that continues to listen and join in. In this season 5 premiere, we continue with our album review series, and we put Russ up to bat (and bat he certainly did). It's truly hard to put into words what this album brings to the table, but we all certainly tried to convey this the best we could. What this album is, is the culmination of working in the limelight since you were in kindergarten, only to grow up and find out that you appreciate the world far more than they appreciate you. You've seen how cruel the world can be firsthand over the years, but you never imagined what being labeled as the worst thing in society could have brought you. Ridiculed and scrutinized into being a recluse, you take to what you know best and speak out to let the world know exactly how you feel. HIStory: Past, Present, and Future, Book I is the ninth studio album from the late, great, and immensely talented Michael Jackson. Released on June 20, 1995, after years of immense and tumultuous scrutiny by the tabloid media over accusations that would never end up being proven by anyone—in fact, it was quite the opposite. Throughout the record, you can, at various points, hear MJ directly address these issues, and confront those involved head-on. Despite his constant battles in and out of the courtroom, HIStory: Past, Present, and Future, Book I debuted at number 1, on the Billboard 200. Though the album received generally positive reviews, the lyrics of "They Don't Care About Us" drew accusations of antisemitism, to which Jackson responded that the lines had been misinterpreted and replaced them on later pressings. The album has sold over 20 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling albums of all time, and the best-selling multi-disc album. In August 2018, it was certified 8x platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).Michael Jackson would go on to release just one more studio album before his sudden and tragic death. Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Well somehow, someway, by the grace of the musical gods we've made it into our fifth season as a podcast. Well let me back up for a second, we've made it to the end of our fourth season, and if you guys keep listening and supporting, we'll be back for season five in just a few weeks. It's that time of the year again where Kyle and Michelle not only battle one another over their Spotify listening stats, but they also battle against Spotify (or the "robots" as they call them) over the legitimacy of their own year-end listening statistics. If you're not familiar with what I am talking about because you don't use Spotify as a streaming service, let me explain real quick. At the end of each year, Spotify provides each of its users with a chunk of their streaming data. Presented in a neat and clever little package that they've titled "Wrapped". I don't know if they do this to pretend like they're only using your data for this purpose, or for the fun of it. Either way, it can be quite interesting when you look at what you've been listening to all broken down into numbers. When all is said and done you may or may not agree with how companies use your data, but I think you might be lying if you have Spotify and haven't checked out your "Wrapped" over the years. If you're a long-time listener, you may recall last year when Kyle lost his mind because Michelle had higher numbers than he did. If you haven't listened to this, it's not only hilarious and an absolute must listen but pretty much the reason why we started going over our stats at the end of the season. Whether you trust the robots to tell you what you've been up to, or like Kyle and Michelle you're extremely skeptical about what they have to say, you're not going to want to miss us digging into this once again. It's the season 4 finale of Daniel Ek's personal Chef's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Who the f#$k is Matt Maeson!?! Am I right? It's okay, you and probably everyone else that read the title of this episode was most likely thinking something similar. With that being said, Kyle is glad that you asked. Hailing from Norfolk, Virginia, Matt Maeson is a singer-songwriter and musician. Most of that probably seems obvious, you know since you're listening to a music podcast and this is an album review—but hey again I'm just the intern and my job is to get you up to speed and inform you at least a little bit about what the hell you're getting yourself into here. You're welcome. With that being said, the reason you might not have heard the name Matt Maeson is that he's a relative newcomer to the industry (though he's gotten multiple standing ovations while performing for prisoners across the country), and whether you like it or not there is a very good chance you're going to be hearing a lot more from him sooner rather than later. He officially made his first appearance on airwaves in 2016, released a few singles, a few more EPs, and by the time 2019 rolled around he released his first full-length project called "Bank On The Funeral". An album that is full of self-reflection and a need to understand, draped with raw desperation, redemption, and love. For being his first full-length project it would be an understatement if I didn't say it packed quite the emotional punch. With such a spare and rich sound it's easy to see why when most people hear him, they immediately want more. Having found a decent amount of success with what he's put forth thus far, it's safe to say that he's probably not going to be going anywhere anytime soon. Join us again, and we take a dive into something new and tell you all why we think we know what we're talking about when it comes to a damn good album. It's season 4, episode 24 of Mr. Maeson's manager's newly discovered favorite music podcast. Let's hope he spreads the word! LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Crowds, Caution and Caring

Crowds, Caution and Caring

2021-12-0601:03:35

Throughout music history, there have been quite a few concerts that turned into a catastrophe, but you don't really hear much about it until it happens again. Travis Scott is the latest artist to be publicly crucified because of the tragic events that unfolded at his most recent Astroworld Music Festival—but who is at fault when this type of thing happens? The artists? The venue? The crowd? When tragedy strikes your favorite live venue, it's easy to start throwing stones and placing blame on anyone in the vicinity. Truth is, even though Travis Scott happens to be the latest artist involved in a show gone terribly wrong, he's certainly not the first, and absolutely won't be the last.One must understand that something that is negative will almost always outshine something that is positive. No one ever talks about feeling safe at a live show (even though it happens all the time), but you will hear a whole lot of stories about people feeling unsafe. When it comes down to it, compared to the sheer amount of concerts that occur, there is very rarely something tragic and terrible that happens—which is why the situation sticks out like a sore thumb when it does. Most live shows go as planned, with the usual hiccups, and without anything major happening, but what happens when that's not the case?Well, what happens is, all hell breaks loose, and usually, instead of the parties involved stepping up and taking responsibility, everyone typically starts to place blame on one another while all the separate pieces of a tragic situation get overlooked. Most of us have been part of these live music crowds, and we all probably have stories about how quickly things can go from bad to worse when you're dealing with the general public that has been packed into a venue like a can of sardines—but there is so much more that factors into whether or not a situation will bring the worst out of people. It only takes a split second for a "safe" crowd to become dangerous and by the time that this happens, it's oftentimes too late to do anything about it. There is very little that any amount of "security" is going to be able to do to a surging crowd full of thousands of rowdy and raging fans. Now mix drugs and alcohol, a culture of going to just party and destroy shit, a venue or artist that hires random people off the street (or in some cases a biker gang) to pose as security, and then other artists that seem to encourage the crowd's dangerous behavior. This creates a "perfect storm" of a situation and rarely does anything good come of it. When it comes down to something that has so many moving pieces involved, all of those pieces share in some of the responsibility of what happens at these events. It's hard to see and understand this at the time because when something tragic like the loss of a life (or multiple lives) happens it takes a long time for the dust to settle and the details of what actually happened to come out. Sprinkle in people on the internet concocting wild conspiracy theories about what went on, and then it takes even longer to sort everything out. Things like what happened at Astroworld don't have to happen, but they will continue to occur unless we all step up to change how we behave when we visit our favorite music venues. Come with us for a bit while we try and figure out how something so right, can go so wrong. It's season 4, episode 23 of your favorite coffee house barista's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
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