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Infectious Groove Podcast

Infectious Groove Podcast

Author: Infectious Groove Podcast

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We love music. You love music. Let's talk about it. From current events, crazy show stories, what we're currently listening to, and anything else that is on our minds—there may even be a special guest on to answer all of your burning questions.

The only way to know is to tune in weekly and find out.
80 Episodes
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Snob - noun 1. a person who imitates, cultivates, or slavishly admires social superiors and is condescending or overbearing to others. 2. a person who believes himself or herself an expert or connoisseur in a given field and is condescending toward or disdainful of those who hold other opinions or have different tastes regarding this field: i.e. a music snob. All snobs are not created equal, and their levels of snobbery can differ greatly depending on what they are being snobby about. I think we can all agree that some of the worst snobs that one can come across in the wild is, yup you guessed it—the elusive music snob. You know, the guy that knows more than anyone else about music in general, and has to let you know about it every chance he gets? You know, the guy that thinks everyone who doesn't appreciate music as much as he does is just another moron that he has to deal with every day? We all know those guys, hell some of us have even been those guys at some point in our lives. Where does this type of snobbery come from? Passion? Arrogance? Privilege? This week we take a dive into a subject that hits especially close to home. Think of it as a bit of a roundtable discussion with a few recovering music snobs. How did it start? How bad did it get And how the hell have we've gotten this far? The bad, the good, and a funny Russ story or two. We break it all down this week. It's season 3, episode 16 of your favorite Doorman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Oh, we almost forgot to ask, do you even music bro!?!? Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Brand New as a band has been called a lot of things (Emo, Punk, etc.), but one thing you won't find anyone calling them is brand new. Yes, that was a bad dad joke and no, I do not regret it. Formed in 2000, the band has been around the block a time or two, and they are largely considered to be one of the most influential bands in the early 2000's "emo" music scene—let's be honest here, if you were there, then you already know. It was in 2003 when the band released their second studio effort to the masses. This was also the first album where the band decided to switch its sound up from what fans had gotten used to with their debut release "Your Favorite Weapon" which sold over 50,000 copies but not nearly as much as they had hoped. "Deja Entendu" which is French for "already heard" debuted at number 63 on the Billboard 200, and after just 7 weeks sold more than 51,000 copies already closing in on the total figure of its predecessor. Deja Entendu was a welcomed change for the fans of the band, and its popularity opened up new doors and industry opportunities —which resulted in the band being signed to their first major record label. Up to that point, the band had been riding the indie record label wave and hadn't caught the eye of the major players in the music industry. By 2007, four years after its release "Deja Entendu" was certified Gold by the RIAA for surpassing 500,000 sales in the United States. You can love them, you can hate them—hell you can even love to hate them, but you certainly cannot deny their influence on the early 2000's emo/rock scene as a whole. You've almost certainly heard at least one of their songs on your local radio station, and watched at least one of their music videos on MTV after you got out of school. This week we take it back to High School and dig into what it was (or wasn't) that made us latch on to what Brand New was willing to offer up at the time. It's season 3, episode 15 of your favorite retired Warped Tour roadie's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
What do you get when you combine a decent screenplay based on personal experiences, a director with a specific vision for bringing that screenplay to life, and a controlling movie studio just looking to cash in on the latest movie craze? Simply put, you get what eventually became the cult classic Empire Records. This film is many things for many people but when all is said and done it seems like it's a film that's "just there" for most. Chances are you've seen this film at some point since its 1995 debut, and if you were one of the lucky ones who got to see it in one of 87 theaters it played in—you should probably play the lottery more often, just make damn sure it's not on Rex Manning Day. You've been warned. What was supposed to be the next big hit music-based film, with a huge theatrical debut and a killer soundtrack to follow, turned into the movie studio/production company doing little to no promotion for the film, taking control of the direction of the film, and turning that huge theatrical debut into a theatrical release that was a fraction of what was originally planned. Oh and that killer soundtrack that was supposed to accompany the film turned into a hodgepodge of random songs—many having nothing at all to do with the actual film itself. But why? How did a film with such potential turn into a bastardized version of what could have been? This week we take a look at (and attempt to unpack) what the hell happened with this train wreck turned cult classic, and try and get Russ to look beyond his love for music and enjoy the film for what it is—a feel-good film, with simple but interesting character dynamics, witty one-liners, and an overall message of sticking it to "the man". It's season 3 episode 14 of your favorite record store owner's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Prince was many things to many people. A legend. An icon. An extremely talented musician. A man who lived his life shrouded in mystery. But most importantly Prince was an artist—but not just your average run-of-the-mill artist. Prince knew who he was through and through and never tried to be something that he wasn't. Prince was an artist that refused to be labeled and boxed into anything but what he created for himself. One may wonder how someone (no matter how talented they are) would be able to create an album that would match the success of Purple Rain—but that's just it, Prince never worried about being able to live up to any sort of standard the music industry had set for him. He had already moved on and started working on new projects at the height of his success with Purple Rain. One of those projects became "Around The World In A Day" which he loosely started working on before Purple Rain became the Purple Rain that we all know and love. At the top of Purple Rain mountain, he was able to look at things a bit differently, and see that his label was going to milk Purple Rain for everything it was worth, and this was his chance to divert the masses to something new and exciting sounding—and that's exactly what he did. Around The World In A Day wasn't for everyone, hell Prince himself wasn't for everyone, but that was the point. Around The World In A Day was created first and foremost for Prince himself, and of course for his fans—as an open letter of sorts to let his true fans know that they were on the same musical wavelength. No Prince record would ever attain the success that Purple Rain did, but Prince didn't care, he had to stay true to himself and he knew the only way to do that was to go in the direction that Around The World In A Day would take him. This week we take a deep dive into Prince's seventh studio album and the second release where his backing band "The Revolution" was officially billed. Around The World In A Day takes us on what many would say is a psychedelic adventure of sorts. Come with us as we take this ride and decide how we all feel about it. It's season 3 episode 13 of your favorite Paisley Park aficionado's favorite music podcast. You're not going to want to miss this one. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Algorithmic Blues

Algorithmic Blues

2021-04-1201:06:011

TL;DR: The internet is both equally fascinating as it is a scary place, and Skynet might be closer than we once thought.The internet as we know it quite literally wouldn't be the internet without the use of algorithms. They're responsible for how we consume what we consume on our favorite forms of social media, and they're pretty much responsible for the ins and outs of how much of the internet works these days—and we're (humans, not this podcast) responsible for creating them. The advancement of technology is not only important, it's crucial for the advancement of society in general, but what happens when that gets out of control? What happens when an algorithm can teach itself and it no longer needs a human counterpart to gain intelligence? You might be thinking to yourself, didn't they make a movie about this exact type of thing?—and the answer is yes, they've made all sorts of movies based on technology getting out of control because of how careless humans are. Think The Terminator franchise, we're almost certain that everyone but Michelle has seen at least one of them. Skynet. Is. Terrifying. Yes, that's a film (or a series of films) and this is a music podcast—so what the hell am I talking about right? Again, I just want to state that I am the intern here, and I just do as I am told. Beyond that, we've reached a crossroad where technology and music have met yet again, but in a much stranger and almost creepier way than you might think. Algorithms have now been designed to isolate hooks, rhythms, melodies, and lyrics from some of your favorite artists and songs. Cool right? Well sure that sounds cool but here is where things start to get a little weird. Videos started popping up on sites all over the web that sounded like new or updated songs from artists we all know and love, but heres the catch, those artists never recorded any of the lyrics to those songs. When those algorithms isolate that stuff, they're then able to digitally recreate a song that sounds so similar to the real thing that if you didn't know ahead of time that it wasn't, you wouldn't know any different—and that's where the creepiness starts to come in. BUT WAIT! THERE'S MORE! Has this technology gone too far already? We thought so until we came across Over The Bridge, a company using this mind-blowing technology to spread mental health awareness throughout the music industry. How? Great question, but I have an even better answer—tune in and find out. It's season 3, episode 12 of your favorite algorithm's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
What seems like years ago, but in reality has just been a bit over a year now—everything stopped in its tracks. The world as we knew it stopped. Everything. Stopped. Once the dust settled we knew we were in for what seemed like a long haul, but none of us really knew how long of a haul we were actually in for. The world as a whole would never quite be the same, but the way a global pandemic would affect the music industry as a whole would be both a debilitating and revolutionary experience. Unable to tour, perform shows, properly record new music, artists found themselves at a particularly unique fork in the road—adapt or die. As fans, we had no clue and at that moment couldn't even fathom what the future would hold. Tours canceled, album releases pushed back—the music industry as we knew it had closed up shop. Much like the artists, music fans also found themselves at a particularly unique fork in the road—adapt or die, and that is exactly what everyone did. Artists and fans alike took to the internet and started using it in every way possible in order to push the industry forward. Live shows with a full band, became virtual solo shows held on a couch. Heading to the studio to work on an album turned into linking up with fellow artists and producers virtually via "Quarantine Studios" which was created by rapper Jim Jones and lets artists collaborate and record with one another in real-time with no virtual lag. No more live shows? No problem. Fans began to tune-in in record numbers to watch their favorite artists perform from the comfort of their own homes. With the inability to flip through bins at the local record store, people flooded online record retailers like never before—proving that even if things were the furthest from normal that they had ever been, fans and artists alike would figure it out, together. In this episode, we talk about how the pandemic has affected how we consume music overall, our listening habits, how we find new artists to check out, buy music, and so much more. You've been right there with us this whole time, so you're certainly not going to want to miss this one. It's season 3, episode 11 of your favorite frontline worker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Due to the nature of this episode, it is recommended that you not only take a listen to the album being reviewed but that you also listen to that album at full volume so that you can fully immerse yourself. Thank you for listening and joining in on the discussion. Enjoy. This week we continue with our brand new album review series, where one of us picks an album, and we all take a crack at unpacking, picking apart, reviewing, and then repacking said album. Take a trip with us on this special episode of Infectious Groove Podcast. By the late 1970s, the popularity of The Rolling Stones was on a steady decline due to the fact that the music charts started to be largely dominated by disco and newer rock bands like Aerosmith and Kiss. Sprinkle in the rising UK punk rock movement which at the time led to most of the artists linked to the 1960s era feeling obsolete. The band had also failed to produce a critically acclaimed album since the early 70s. It was the perfect storm for a wildly successful rock band, to no longer be certain of where they fit in. That perfect storm led to Mick Jagger focusing creatively on the reinvigoration of the band as a whole. Using NYC as the main inspiration, "Some Girls" was born. Mick, widely regarded as the creative driving force behind the new album, had a vision of how he wanted to get the band back on track and back on the charts. Mick's vision paid off as "Some Girls" climbed the charts as a newly refreshed Stones lineup geared up for chart-topping success once again. "Some Girls" went on to reach No. 2 on the UK album charts and No. 1 on the US Billboard 200. It became the band's top-selling album in the US having been certified by the RIAA for selling 6 million copies by 2000. Some Girls was the 14th British and 16th American studio album by The Rolling Stones. It's jam-packed with a montage of hits that span a multitude of genres. Everything from Disco to Country, all the way down to that classic Stones sound that we know and love. Hit? Stinkers? Songs that were just meh? We break it all down on season 3, episode 10 of your favorite refrigerator repair man's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Forgive Or Forget

Forgive Or Forget

2021-03-2259:55

WARNING: This episode contains language and descriptions of situations regarding instances of individuals becoming infected with a very contagious music-based fever and possible sickness. Listen at your own risk. From a very young age we’re all taught that we grow, live, learn, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes and continue to grow—hell we even make the same mistakes twice, sometimes three times and that’s okay because we are living and learning along the way. This is all fine and good unless you beat the odds and rise to some sort of level of superstardom or fame. Because even though celebrities and influencers are human just like the rest of us, they are held to a much higher standard, and life is much less forgiving. Sprinkle in the many pieces that make up the internet, and you have a recipe for disaster. A recipe that if prepared just right can upend and destroy the best of careers—and for what? Just to prove the point that the person you’ve rallied everyone against has a differing opinion than you and your faithful keyboard warriors? How have we gotten to the point where the collective internet feels like they have the right to take from someone everything that they’ve spent their entire lives working toward? How have we gotten to a place where another human is held to such a high standard of living they aren’t allowed to make mistakes like the rest of us—even if they learn from those mistakes, and don’t make them again? How have we gotten to the point where lyrics in a song become more tangible to the internet than the actual negative actions and decisions that someone has made in real life? This becomes a slippery slope when we’re talking about the rights of an individual and the freedom of speech that they’re entitled to. Where do we draw the line? Canceling or “Cancel culture” as it’s often referred to is dangerous when used improperly and it seems like we’re dealing with the fallout from this on a daily basis. Where does this end? Is there an end? Is there even an answer as to how we fix the problem at hand? We talk this and more on season 3 episode 9 of your favorite internet sleuths favorite music podcast. LET’S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Women That Rock - Part 2

Women That Rock - Part 2

2021-03-1501:02:40

TL;DR: Women are music industry badasses. Disclaimer: This is the second and final part of our two-part episode on Women That Rock, so if you've ended up here and you haven't listened to part one, it is suggested you start there—or hell carry on doing what you do, it's up to you. Much like every other industry on earth, the music industry is dominated by old white guys that dictate who goes where, and what happens next. This has always been the case and is still the way things operate today. Throughout musical history, every so often a woman comes along and puts those old white guys in their place by showing them that the industry just wouldn't be the same without them. It might seem that due to the fact that the music industry is so heavily male-dominated that a female artist with any sort of talent at all gets noticed and becomes something—but it's quite the opposite. The women that are at the forefront of music, are the ones that deserve to be there, and they've had to work harder than everyone else to get where they are. It's Women's History Month and in the second and final part of this multi-part episode, we continue to break down and unpack what it is to be not only a woman in the music industry but also a woman that is an absolute badass within the music industry. In part 2, we continue with even more heavy hitters, and we didn't even get around to mentioning everyone that deserves a mention (sorry in advance). Which heavy hitters you might ask? Wouldn't you like to know? Truthfully the only way to know is by tuning in and finding out. And to be completely honest, I'm just an unpaid intern, so giving you hints definitely isn't in my best interest—I can only do so much here. It's season 3, episode 8 of your favorite Neighborhood Watch Block Captain's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Women That Rock - Part 1

Women That Rock - Part 1

2021-03-0801:04:29

TL;DR: Women are music industry badasses. Much like every other industry on earth, the music industry is dominated by old white guys that dictate who goes where, and what happens next. This has always been the case and is still the way things operate today. Throughout musical history, every so often a woman comes along and puts those old white guys in their place by showing them that the industry just wouldn't be the same without them. It might seem that due to the fact that the music industry is so heavily male-dominated that a female artist with any sort of talent at all gets noticed and becomes something—but it's quite the opposite. The women that are at the forefront of music, are the ones that deserve to be there, and they've had to work harder than everyone else to get where they are. It's Women's History Month and in the first part of this multi-part episode, we start to break down and unpack what it is to be not only a woman in the music industry but also a woman that is an absolute badass within the music industry. In part 1, we get right to it with some heavy hitters, and this is just the beginning. Which heavy hitters you might ask? Wouldn't you like to know? Truthfully the only way to know is by tuning in and finding out. And to be completely honest, I'm just an unpaid intern, so giving you hints definitely isn't in my best interest—I can only do so much here. It's season 3, episode 7 of your favorite Grammy Award Nominee's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Due to the nature of this episode, it is recommended that you not only take a listen to the album being reviewed but that you also listen to that album at full volume so that you can fully immerse yourself. Thank you for listening and joining in on the discussion. Enjoy.This week we're starting off with something a little different than what you might be used to. Every now and again we will be picking an album, taking a listen, and then taking a deep dive into discussing that album as a whole. This is our first crack at it. The 70's would be considered by many to be a rough time in our nation's history. Violence, protest, and hardship were at the forefront of everyone's thoughts. But it's the music that always ends up finding its way through to us no matter how hard times get, and this time was no different. Rough times make for great tunes, and John Fogerty knew exactly what he was doing when it came to translating the times at hand into monster hits. Creedance Clearwater Revival fans were in for a treat when "Cosmo's Factory" was released to the masses. Using his signature howling rasp, guitar, expert production, and intentional use of musical styles that both inspired and pushed the boundaries of what we were all used to hearing. Cosmo's Factory is the fifth album by Creedence Clearwater Revival and it's chocked full of howling vocals, crisp instrumentation, massive hits, and an eleven-minute version of a song that most of us believe doesn't need to be eleven minutes long. This week we unpack this album little by little and discuss our thoughts. It's season three, episode six of your favorite handyman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Growing Pains

Growing Pains

2021-02-2201:01:08

I think we can all agree that growing up is hard to do. I think we can all also agree that music makes growing a tad bit more tolerable. Often times we forget just how important music is when it comes to shaping us into whom we grow to be as individuals. Looking back, it seems crazy to think that so many of us still listen to the same artists and acts that we did as kids. For others, their musical taste changed growing up as often as their mom's boyfriend did—and that equally plays an important part in what they listen to today. At what point does someone settle into a majority of the music that they consume? Do they ever settle? Music is always transforming and transitioning into different forms of what it once ways, so how does one keep up? For some, as the music grows, they grow right along with it. This week we talk about what influenced us musically growing up, and what impact that had on what we listen to today. You're in for another fun one, but only if you tune in to season three, episode five of your mom's seventh boyfriend's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
The Art Of Selling Out

The Art Of Selling Out

2021-02-1501:08:45

TL;DR: Your favorite musical act or artist might be a sellout. It's 1991 and you've just waited in line for several hours to get your hands on what you hope is the greatest Metallica album yet. You finally get home, spark up a doobie, crack open a cold one, and prepare to get your face melted off again by your favorite band. You press play, and almost as quickly as the sound waves hit your ears you start to cringe and become confused. Your finger finds the stop button as quickly as it hit play—as you just stare blankly at the jewel case this newly found piece of trash came in. "Wtf is this shit?" you think to yourself, still snarling under your breath about what your ears just had to endure. "Maybe it's just me" you murmur, and you hit play once again. This time you skip ahead a few tracks hoping to find something familiar, something that you're used to. You turn the volume knob to your right, as far as it will go, and hope for the best. But the best was doing its best to elude you. This was no Metallica that you were used to—a buzzkill at best. You grab the jewel case to make sure you didn't grab the wrong album out of excitement. You pull the booklet out and give it a once over. Produced by Bob Rock. "Wtf is a Bob Rock, and what in the hell did he do to Metallica?" you snarl to yourself. Angry, you throw the case and the booklet into the garbage. "These guys are a bunch of God Damn sellouts!" you yell as you storm out of the room. Fast forward to today, you've found your own little corner of the internet to hide in—trying day in, and day out to convince those you meet that Metallica sold themselves to the giant corporate devil the day that The Black Album was released. "Selling out" and the music industry goes as far back as we can remember. They seemingly go hand in hand, but why? Countless acts have been accused of selling themselves and their fans short to get to the next levels of their career. But what really makes an artist or act a sellout—and who or what are they selling out? Does it matter if you hear your favorite band in a car commercial? What if your favorite rapper is trying to sell you some "sugar water shit"? Where do we draw the line? Isn't the idea to get yourself as many opportunities in the industry as possible in order to further your career? Who's calling the shots here? We talk about this and so much more on season 3, episode 4 of your favorite industry sellout's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
The misinterpretation of song lyrics goes back as far as songwriting does—because let's face it the only one that really knows what a song is about is the person or people writing it. So it really is easy to take something a certain way when you aren't even sure how it was supposed to be taken to begin with. This is especially true when it comes to "love songs" or what we think sounds or feels like a love song. More often than not, a song that sounds like it's about love, is in fact about something much deeper and oftentimes much darker. Traditionally love songs find their way into some of lifes most important moments, and they forever imbed themselves into how we think and feel about those moments. When those wedding bells ring, event DJs around the world cringe knowing they're going to have to explain to yet another "Bride-to-be" that no one can love one another enough to make it okay to be possessed by them and that certainly doesn't make them a better man. This week we've taken it upon ourselves to discuss just a few of the constantly misinterpreted songs out there that people, for better or for worse think are love songs—which at face value may sound a whole lot like a love song but are about pretty much the exact opposite. If you're in the market for a marital celebration you may want to give this episode a listen first. It's season 3. episode 3 of your favorite wedding DJ's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
TL;DR: Holy Shit, it's Bill Champlin! Here at IGP, we've been fortunate enough to sit down and talk with more than our fair share of seasoned musicians, and this week's episode is no different. Russ had the pleasure of catching up with musician, producer, singer, and Grammy Award-winning songwriter, Bill Champlin. Most notably known for his tenure with the American Classic Rock band Chicago. Bill is absolutely someone who comes to mind when we think of or talk about seasoned musicians. During his almost twenty-year run with Chicago, Bill sang as the lead vocalist on some of the band's biggest hits. Beyond the critically acclaimed mainstream success of Chicago, Bill has also maintained a successful solo career and continued to work with Sons of Champlin—a band he started back in high school. Side note, if you've ever watched or even heard of the old TV police drama "In the Heat of the Night" which ran on both NBC and CBS for several seasons then you got to hear Bill front and center each week because he is the one that sings the theme song at the beginning of each episode. You're probably thinking to yourself, well that's all fine and dandy but what the hell is Bill up to nowadays? We're glad you asked (or were at least thinking about asking), but you're going to have to open your favorite podcast app, open your favorite podcast up (us), and then listen to this episode. I suppose you could also go to his Wikipedia page but we cannot verify any of that, and why waste your time when you can hear it directly from Bill himself on the newest episode of your favorite Chicago tribute band's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Find Bill Champlin on facebook @billchamplinmusic and twitter @billchamplin. You can also visit his official website at www.billchamplin.com and listen to/buy "Livin' For Love" on your favorite music platform. Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Third Time's A Charm

Third Time's A Charm

2021-01-2501:09:541

Guess who's back, back again, IGP's back...tell your friends. Okay, that was an awful way to start this off but it was the only thing that came to mind—also who reads this shit anyhow? That's neither here nor there I suppose. Somehow, someway, we've made it all the way to season three, and it feels so good to be back! Okay, we're done with the Eminemisms, scouts honor. You're probably wondering what you might have missed while we were gone—no worries we've got that handled for you. It was our 1-year anniversary, a.k.a our podday, a.ka our gol damn birthday. So really all you missed out on was sending us some of those b-day dolla dolla bills to infectiousgroovepodcash@gmail.com (via paypal ofcourse)...we're kidding though.........kind of. We're back at it feelin' like a freshly pressed triple LP, and boy do we have a treat for you. Russ went ahead and dug into the Infectious Groove archives and put together a little something special for all of you. Join us as we take a journey all the way back to the beginning of a time where we not only had no clue what we were doing (as a show) but we always almost always had no clue what Michelle was talking about (yes even back then). Think of this as a bit of a clip-show, you know like a shit-show, but way cooler. It's season three, episode one of your favorite Subway Sandwich Artist's favorite music podcast, LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
New year, same show. Who dis? TLDR: THANK YOU! Well, 2020 was nothing short of the largest dumpster fire any of us probably have ever witnessed. As Parker McCollum once said "It's been a hell of a year", and honestly we couldn't agree more. With that being said, if it weren't for everything unfolding as it did, this podcast probably wouldn't even exist—and for that, we are truly thankful. We've somehow made it out of season two, and are going full throttle into season three, and that is because of all of you—we certainly wouldn't have gotten this far if it weren't for all of you tuning in each week—so from all three of us, thank you, it truly means the world to us to be able to connect with each of you every week. Whether you're into streaming music or not (and you probably are) Spotify's place at the top of the streaming game is undeniable—and before you even say it, we know they should be paying artists more and we are absolutely an advocate for that happening, but that is a whole other episode worth of shenanigans to talk about. Spotify has made it easier than ever to wrap up your year in music by letting you know specifically how many times you caught Bieber fever, were looking for that Vitamin D, or even how long you were staring at the Man in the Mirror. A bit creepy if you ask us—no wonder Kyle and Michelle are skeptical about these god damn robots thinking they know everything about what we're listening to. Regardless of how accurate the robots actually are, we unwrap our own Spotify 2020 Wrapped stats for all of you as we bring this season to a close. Top songs, top artists, and so much more. It's season two, episode 19 of your favorite algorithm's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Thank you again to all of our listeners, supporters, and haters. Without you, we are nothing. Thank you to Manscaped for keeping our balls happy. Thank you to the OddPods Media Network for giving us a place to rest our mics and last but not least thank you to Spreaker for giving us a platform where all of you can listen in each week. Love ya'll! Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Reaction Retraction

Reaction Retraction

2020-12-2801:26:22

Disclaimer: We were going to make this the holiday episode, but Jesus and Kyle are still fighting over who's birthday was more fun—so this is what you get. TLDR: Long story short, things change and so does our taste in music. A wise man once said "The more you grow, the more you know", and while we've found out over the last four years that this saying isn't necessarily as accurate as we once thought—there is some truth to it (especially when it comes to this weeks topic). Let's face it, musical acts come and go (or sometimes they just won't go away... like Creed), and oftentimes so does our taste in music. There are a ton of things that make us change our minds about an artist or an act. Maybe they're awful as a live act, maybe they completely changed direction with their music, or maybe you realized they're a moron and just not for you. Hell, maybe you thought something wasn't for you, and boom you heard a song one day and hallelujah you wanted some more of that and now you're a Super Fan (not to be confused with Super American)—we get it, we really do. So sit back, watch your neighbor (finally) take down all of their Trump paraphernalia, and get lost in season two, episode eighteen of your favorite Amazon delivery driver's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network. #WWMTA
You're on your way to meet some friends at some new restaurant in South Detroit, but as you're nearing the city you're beginning to realize that there are in fact no freeway signs pointing you in the direction of "South" Detroit. Growing more and more confused the further and further you find yourself in the city you finally give in, pull over, and ask a passerby for help. "Hey man, can you tell me how to get to South Detroit?". "South Detroit? You mean that song they play at all the hockey games?" a man looking somewhat inconvenienced replies. Yes? you say, now even more confused. You pull out your phone, pull up maps, and see if you can perhaps find this elusive and mysterious part of the city. While doing so you notice that you have a Youtube recommendation that you've yet to check out, so you do. Oddly enough it's a video of a guy singing Journey's monster hit "Faithfully", but it isn't Steve Perry, yet it sounds damn near identical. Like mostly everyone watching, your mind is blown, and the rest is history. Fast forward a few years, and though you might not have found what you were looking for that night, you did find something along with the rest of the world—and that something was Filipino singer/songwriter and future frontman (though he didn't know it yet) of one of the most well-known and iconic bands on the planet. This week we had the pleasure of catching up with Arnel Pineda. Best known for his role as the current lead singer for the band Journey—but that's not all he's been up to. There certainly is more than meets the eye when it comes to this guy—plus Russ finally gets to set the record straight on the infamous (and very much non-existent) South Detroit. If you're a fan of Journey, if you're a fan of music, hell if you're a fan of Steve Perry (because this guy sounds just like him) you're not going to want to miss this one. It's season two, episode seventeen of your favorite cover band's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network. #WWMTA
Physical Media Madness!!!

Physical Media Madness!!!

2020-12-1401:18:11

Over here at IGP, we've come up with a quick word problem for you, ready? What do you get when you take an intimidated Kyle, add an inconvenienced Michelle, and then throw in a self-proclaimed recovering music snob named Russ? If your answer was "this podcast duh", you're both a little right and a little wrong. The answer that would get you the most points is three people who go about obtaining physical media in similar but mostly different ways. TLDR: GO LISTEN TO THIS EPISODE. Record stores have long been labeled as the place where supposed music snobs hung out and joked about kids that "didn't or wouldn't understand" the importance of vinyl—and while there is some truth to this, you might be surprised by just how welcoming the vinyl community actually is. We've talked about the film Vinyl Nation on multiple episodes and even spoken to the directors in an episode solely dedicated to the film. The film takes a deep dive into the vinyl community, and what we learned is that it's really not full of just music snobs that think they know everything about the medium. A vinyl resurgence has been in full swing for a few years now and it's seemingly easier than ever to find your favorite albums on wax—so much so that big-box retailers have even gotten into the game. So where does your local record store fit into that? Glad you asked, and right now they're fitting in just fine. It's gotten to a point where it can even be a little confusing as to where you should or shouldn't be getting your vinyl from. From quality to pricing, variety, and even convenience—we even talk a little about the dreaded PICTURE DISC! O-M-G, you're not gonna wanna miss this one! It's season two, episode sixteen of your favorite record store clerk's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network. #WWMTA
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Comments (3)

Castbox

Love what y'all are doing with this podcast. It's a grab bag of fun and your inter-host banter is top notch!

Mar 19th
Reply

Arielle Nissenblatt

“gangsta rap” hahaha

Mar 16th
Reply (1)
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