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Inheriting

Author: NPR

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Inheriting is a show about Asian American and Pacific Islander families, which explores how one event in history can ripple through generations. In doing so, the show seeks to break apart the AAPI monolith and tell a fuller story of these communities. In each episode, NPR's Emily Kwong sits down with one family and facilitates deeply emotional conversations between their loved ones, exploring how their most personal, private moments are an integral part of history. Through these stories, we show how the past is personal and how to live with the legacies we're constantly inheriting. Learn more at LAist.com/Inheriting
12 Episodes
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Japanese American Incarceration. The Third World Liberation Front. The 1992 Los Angeles Uprising. What you think you know isn't always the full story. "Inheriting" is a show about Asian American and Pacific Islander families that explores how the past is personal. Hosted by NPR's Emily Kwong, we go deep with families on how their most personal, private moments are part of history.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
In part two of Carol Kwang Park's story, we follow Carol's journey to connect more deeply with her family – and introduce the family-led conversations that are central to "Inheriting." Decades after the 1992 L.A. Uprising, Carol finally learns what her mom experienced during the riots and how she made it back home. It allows for a better understanding of her mother, as well as her family's journey leading up to the Uprising – which she never had as a child. For the first time, Carol also talks to her brother, Albert Park, about what it was like to work at the gas station as kids, especially around the time of the Uprising.If you want to learn more about any of the historical moments we talk about on our show, visit our website: LAist.com/InheritingWe have a variety of resources for you, as well as lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project.Lesson 5.2 (Grades 5-12): The 1992 LA Civil Unrest https://asianamericanedu.org/1992-la-civil-unrest-systemic-racism.htmlLesson 5.3 (Grades 7-12): Building Community Consciousness and Coalitions https://asianamericanedu.org/building-community-consciousness-and-coalitions.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Carol Kwang Park was 12 years old, working as a cashier at her family's gas station in Compton, California, when the 1992 L.A. Uprising forever changed her life. Her mom was at the gas station that day and Carol was unsure if she'd even make it home. At the time, she didn't understand why tensions came to a head in Los Angeles, following the acquittal of the officers who beat Rodney King. She also never understood why her mother insisted on keeping the business going, especially after the Uprising. As an adult, a personal crisis prompts Carol to finally start processing that event and her place in history. Content Warning: This episode contains racial slurs and discusses police brutality. If you want to learn more about any of the historical moments we talk about on our show, visit our website: LAist.com/InheritingWe have a variety of resources for you, as well as lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project.Lesson 5.2 (Grades 5-12): The 1992 L.A. Civil Unrest https://asianamericanedu.org/1992-la-civil-unrest-systemic-racism.htmlLesson 5.3 (Grades 7-12): Building Community Consciousness and Coalitions https://asianamericanedu.org/building-community-consciousness-and-coalitions.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Growing up in Long Beach, California, Victoria Uce was surrounded by a loving and supportive family, while her dad, Bo, lost his parents at a young age in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge. Victoria only ever knew the basics of this story. Mainly, that her dad was forced to join the country's mobile youth brigade and take part in the state-sponsored violence that tore Cambodia apart. In this episode, Victoria talks to her father about how he turned away from a life of violence to live a life of compassion and gave her the kind of safety in childhood that he never had.If you want to learn more about any of the historical moments we talk about on our show, visit our website: LAist.com/InheritingWe have a variety of resources for you, as well as lesson plans from The Asian American Education Project.Lesson 4.6 (Grades 6-12): Southeast Asian Refugeeshttps://asianamericanedu.org/southeast-asian-refugees.htmlLesson 5.5.2.1 (Grades 9-12): Fight for Just Immigrationhttps://asianamericanedu.org/fight-for-just-immigration.htmlLesson 4.6.4 (Grades 9-12): Cambodian Refugees in the United Stateshttps://asianamericanedu.org/cambodian-refugees.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Bảo Trương's parents both fled Vietnam in 1975 following the war. His father Thuận was a pilot for the South Vietnamese Air Force and left the day before the Fall of Saigon, evacuating almost 100 people to Thailand on a plane. Thuận has now been settled in the U.S. for decades, but he still writes songs mourning the Vietnam of his childhood – a country that, to him, no longer exists because it is still under a communist government. On the flip side, his son Bảo wants to live in the Vietnam of today, a yearning his father doesn't understand. In this episode, the father and son sit down for a frank conversation about the country they both long for, in different ways.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.You can also find resources about the historic events covered in each episode and relevant lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project, including the ones below.Lesson 4.6.1 (Grades 3-5): Resettlement of Vietnamese Refugees in Southern Californiahttps://asianamericanedu.org/vietnamese-refugees-in-socal.htmlLesson 4.2 (Grades 9-12): Asian Americans Serving and Fighting in the Vietnam Warhttps://asianamericanedu.org/asian-americans-serving-and-fighting-in-vietnam-war.htmlLesson 4.5 (Grades 7-12): Asian American Veterans and the Anti-War Movementhttps://asianamericanedu.org/asian-american-veterans-and-anti-war-movement.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Leah Bash is an avid runner, a dog mom, a wife – and there's a part of her family's history she can't stop thinking about. The fact that both sides of her family were incarcerated alongside 125,000 other Japanese Americans during World War II. Her father and his six siblings spent more than three years behind barbed wire at isolated camps in Manzanar, California and Crystal City, Texas. After Leah learns about her father's struggles with panic attacks and is herself diagnosed with bipolar disorder, she starts to wonder: could those experiences at camp during World War II have far-reaching consequences a generation later?Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.You can also find resources about the historic events covered in each episode and relevant lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project, including the ones below.Lesson 2.1.1 (Grades Pre-K - 6): Japanese American Incarceration and the U.S. Constitution https://asianamericanedu.org/2.1.1-japanese-incarceration-camps-elementary-lesson-plan.htmlLesson 2.3 (Grades 6 - 12): Who Defines Loyalty? Japanese Americans During World War II https://asianamericanedu.org/2.3-define-loyal-american-lesson-plan.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Shakeel Syed has been a longtime activist within his South Asian community, fighting for the civil liberties of Muslims who were targeted by the FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department following the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. But his activism had a cost. He was away from home on nights and weekends, absent from his wife, Saira Sayeed, and their four kids. Saira took on the work at home by herself, and they've never really talked about it. Now, for the first time, Shakeel and Saira open up about the roles they played after 9/11 and the future they want to build together.Stay connected with us! E-mail us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.You can also find resources about the historic events covered in each episode and relevant lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project, including the ones below.Lesson 5.6 (Grades 5-12): "Victimized Twice": 9/11/2001, South Asian Americans & Islamophobiahttps://asianamericanedu.org/victimized-twice-9-11-2001-south-asian-islamophobia.htmlLesson 5.6.1 (Grades 9-12): Hate Crimes Analysis, Post 9/11https://asianamericanedu.org/hate-crime-analysis-post-911.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Leialani Wihongi-Santos is CHamoru and was raised on the island of Guam with a distorted view of history. She was taught that the United States "saved" her island from occupation by Imperial Japan. As she's gotten older, Leialani has learned that framing is not entirely true. In some ways, the U.S. military took advantage of the island and the people who live there, sometimes destroying culture and customs that had survived centuries of colonization. Leialani is now determined to understand more of this history from a CHamoru perspective, so she can preserve and teach it to others. In this episode, she turns to her grandpa, Joseph Aflleje-Santos, for answers.Stay connected with us! E-mail us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.You can also find resources about the historic events covered in each episode and relevant lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project, including the ones below.Lesson 5.8.1.3 (Grades 3-7) - Poetry on Climate Change: Central Ideahttps://asianamericanedu.org/poetry-on-climate-change-central-idea.htmlLesson 5.8.1.2 (Grades 9-12 ) - Pacific Islanders Climate Devastation Poetryhttps://asianamericanedu.org/pacific-islanders-climate-devastation-poetry-grades-9-12.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Should the acronym "AAPI" even exist? In this special episode, we deconstruct it – tracing the 50-year history of the terms "Asian American" and "Pacific Islander" and interrogating how they are used today. Emily talks with Sefa Aina, associate dean and director of the Draper Center for Community Partnerships at Pomona College. He is also a longtime community organizer who served on President Barack Obama's White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Emily and Sefa also discuss how Pacific Islander experiences are often marginalized in so-called AAPI spaces, leading to misleading data sets, funding inequities, and erasure of history.Stay connected with us! E-mail us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Nicole Salaver's uncle, Patrick Salaver, was one of the leaders of the Third World Liberation Front at San Francisco State University in the late 1960s. This movement not only led to the recognition of the term "Asian American," but also brought ethnic studies to colleges nationwide. Pat made a difference in the world as a Filipino civil rights leader, but is largely unknown by the public. Now, Nicole wants to set the record straight and honor her uncle's legacy, while building her own.Follow more of Nicole's work on her show, the Cultural Kultivators Podcast: https://balaykreative.org/cultural-kultivatorsStay connected with us! Email us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.You can also find resources about the historic events covered in each episode and relevant lesson plans from the Asian American Education Project, including the ones below.Lesson 5.2.1 (Grades 1-5): Asian Americans as Activists and Accomplices https://asianamericanedu.org/activists-activism-accomplices.htmlLesson 4.3 (Grades 7-12): The Fight for Ethnic Studies https://asianamericanedu.org/ethnic-studies-the-fight-to-teach-our-stories.htmlLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Our final episode of Season 1 is a special "Inheriting" event recorded in front of a live audience. Host Emily Kwong is joined on stage by Bảo Trương (Episode 4), Shakeel Syed and Saira Sayeed (Episode 6), and Leialani Wihongi-Santos and Joseph Aflleje-Santos (Episode 7). They reveal what it was like to tell their stories and explore their family histories on "Inheriting."Then, Emily is joined by "Inheriting" consulting psychologist Sherry C. Wang and ethnic studies post-doctoral lecturer Carol Kwang Park (Episodes 1 & 2) for a robust and informative conversation about how listeners can interview their own family members.For tips on how to conduct family interviews, check out the Inheriting Resource Guide section for Episode 10: https://laist.com/podcasts/inheriting/inheriting-resource-guideStay connected with us! Email us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.The show is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This week, we bring you a special bonus episode from our friends at the podcast Self Evident: Asian America's Stories.For so many Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Spam is a beloved classic food, showing up in everything from musubi to fried rice. But behind that nostalgia is a history of war and colonization, and the inheritance of both favorite foods and hidden traumas.Korean American playwright Jaime Sunwoo's play, Specially Processed American Me, takes a close look at Spam's legacies, and the lost stories of her own family — who've migrated twice over two generations, from North Korean to South Korea, then from South Korea to the United States.While sharing behind-the-scenes previews of the play, Jaime and Self Evident host Cathy Vo talk about the challenges and rewards of interviewing older generations, and how those conversations have helped Jamie process her own identity as an Asian American. Learn more about the play at speciallyprocessed.com and hear more from Self Evident at selfevidentshow.com.Stay connected with us! Email us at inheriting@laiststudios.com to share your questions, feelings, and even your story.Inheriting is entirely funded by supporters like you. If you want to hear future seasons, go to LAist.com/Inheriting and click on the orange box to donate.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Comments (2)

Maryam Nazari

I'm such a big fannnn😃

Jun 16th
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