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Into America

Into America

Author: MSNBC, Trymaine Lee

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Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.
117 Episodes
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It often takes a tragedy to start a conversation around reform in this country. So when two Black men, Duante Wright and Andrew Brown Jr., were killed by police last month as officers were attempting to serve arrest warrants, calls for warrant reform joined the chorus of other demands for change. Last week, Minnesota lawmakers began the process of trying to answer those calls and put forward a bill that would replace arrest warrants with a written warning system for most misdemeanor offenses.  Ferguson, Missouri may offer lessons about warrant reform to other cities. Reforming the warrant system became a priority in 2015, after the Department of Justice released their report on Ferguson in the wake of Michael Brown’s killing the year before. The report noted that in 2013, Ferguson courts issued nearly 33,000 warrants for arrest, in a city of 21,000 people. The overwhelming majority of warrants were for Black residents. ArchCity Defenders, a legal advocacy organization, helped push for warrant reform in the St. Louis region in 2015 and continues the work today. Executive director BlakeStrode talks to Trymaine Lee about how warrants are used to police Black communities, the successes and challenges of warrant reform, and what other places can learn from Ferguson’s fight for justice. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: Daunte Wright's death fuels push to change Minnesota warrant processMourners say goodbye to Andrew Brown Jr.What the Ferguson DOJ report uncovered about warrants
100 Days of Biden

100 Days of Biden

2021-04-2928:254

President Joe Biden spent his first 100 days in office passing the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill, rolling back executive orders signed by former President Donald Trump, and ramping up a massive vaccination program. 140 million Americans now have at least one dose of the vaccine. His approval ratings are generally high, around 53% according to a new NBC poll. Among Black Americans, it’s much higher, a whopping 83%.But alongside those numbers is a promise Joe Biden made back in November, during his victory speech. He said to Black Americans, “You always had my back, I’ll have yours.” Has he kept that promise?Trymaine Lee goes to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a state that barely flipped back to blue in 2020, and a city where Black turnout actually dropped in some neighborhoods, to ask Black voters if they believe Biden has done enough for them in his first 100 days. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: Into America: I Have Your BackPoll: At 100 days, Biden's approval remains strong. Can the honeymoon last?Biden's $1.8 trillion plan: Raise taxes on rich to fund education, child careBiden's 100-day bet
A Verdict

A Verdict

2021-04-2230:182

Three hundred and thirty-one days ago, Derek Chauvin put his knee on the neck of George Floyd for 9 minutes and 29 seconds. George Floyd took his last breath on his stomach, hands cuffed behind his back.His death, captured on cell phone video by 17-year-old Darnella Frazier, sparked a summer of unrest and calls to abolish the police around the country. This week, after a televised trial and around 11 hours of deliberation, the jury found Derek Chauvin guilty of all three charges he faced: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. It was the first time in Minnesota state history that a white police officer has been held accountable for killing a Black man. It was the first time that America could call Derek Chauvin what many have long believed he is. Murderer.With this verdict, what has been achieved? And what work remains? Shaquille Brewster, correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC, explains the reforms activists in Minneapolis hope to see next. And Shaquille and Trymaine talk about what it has been like covering this case as Black journalists.And in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Trymaine sits down with Tiffany Crutcher, whose brother Terence Crutcher was shot and killed by police in 2016. They talk about how the families of people who have been killed by police are working together to push for greater police accountability and a system that brings us closer to justice.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: Derek Chauvin guilty of murder in George Floyd's death  Here's what the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act would do 'It's a start': People in Minneapolis greet the Chauvin conviction with mixed emotions 
The filibuster is one of the better-known bits of procedure in the Senate. It might conjure images of politicians droning on for hours, or simply partisan gridlock, but the rule has an insidious, racial history. Senators have used it as a tool to block civil rights legislation since the later part of the 18th century. But this history isn’t confined to the past. Today, the threat of a filibuster is colliding with a fight over the future of voting rights, as Republicans vow to block a bill called H.R. 1, which expands voting protections for Black folks and other minorities.There are growing calls to reform or even abolish the filibuster. But Republicans, and a few Democrats, won’t let go of the filibuster without a fight. Host Trymaine Lee talks with New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb about how the filibuster has been weaponized and racialized over time and asks whether American Democracy might be better off without it.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: Joy Reid: Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema chasing a ‘mythical bipartisan beast’ by defending filibuster'An inflection point': Congress prepares for battle over massive voting rights billBiden says Senate filibuster is being 'abused' and must be changed 
It’s the second week of the trial of former Minneapolis police officerDerek Chauvin, and witnesses of all ages have been asked to recount what they saw on May 25th, 2020, as Chauvin kneeled on George Floyd’s neck for almost nine minutes. Emotions in the courtroom have run high as witnesses have been asked to relive the trauma of last summer. In this episode, Dr. BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, founder of the African American Wellness Institute, a mental health agency in Minneapolis, speaks with Trymaine Lee about the physical, psychological, and spiritual impacts of racial trauma on these witnesses and Black communities across the country. She also unpacks the risks of retraumatizationthat come with a public trial.Calling herself a "Black Liberation Psychologist", Dr. Garrett-Akinsanya also touches on the healing journey for these witnesses, and with this trauma and grief, their right to be well as human beings.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: Derek Chauvin trial: Live updates on George Floyd's deathHere's what was revealed in the first week of the Derek Chauvin trialInto America: Jury System on Trial  
Malcolm X and the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. met just one time in life, on March 26, 1964, during Congressional hearings for the Civil Rights Act. The two are often described as opposites, and their styles in the fight for Black freedom were undoubtedly different. But the men had a respect for each other that grew into a deep bond between the two families following their assassinations. Today, Ilyasah Shabazz, the daughters of Malcolm X, and Dr. Bernice King, the daughter of MLK, share a birthright of inherited activism that few others can understand. They each run their families’ foundations, the Shabazz Center and King Center, and strive to carry on their parents’ fight for the future.As one generation’s fight for racial equality spills into the next, Shabazz and Dr. King talk with Trymaine Lee on the latest Into America about their famous parents, the ongoing push for equality, and what it means to inherit a legacy.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Viewing and Listening:“The Dead Are Arising,” Into AmericaWatch: Daughters Of Martin Luther King Jr. And Malcolm X Reflect On Fight For Equality
Tucked inside the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill signed by President Biden on March 11, 2021, is $5 billion worth of aid to help Black and disadvantaged farmers. The American Rescue Plan includes $4 billion to erase debt for any farmer with an outstanding loan that involves the USDA.  And an additional $1 billion dollars has been planned for training, technical assistance, and legal aid... all aimed at helping farmers of color acquire and maintain land, after decades of discrimination from the USDA.Eddie Lewis III is a 5th generation sugarcane farmer from Youngsville, Louisiana. He and his brothers farm the land their ancestors were once sharecroppers on. The Lewis family has paid off millions of dollars in debt to the USDA, and they still have $600,000 in debt remaining. Lewis was thrilled to hear about the relief package because without help, the family is at risk of foreclosure.Lewis joins Trymaine Lee for this episode of Into America, along with John Boyd from the National Black Farmers Association. Boyd walks us through the details of the legislation, and the history of discrimination that has made it so necessary. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com Further Reading and Listening: What's in the $1.9 trillion Covid bill Biden just signed? You might be surprisedInto America: Food for the SoulInto America: Into Protecting Florida Farmworkers
Without Water in Jackson

Without Water in Jackson

2021-03-1825:402

It’s been a month since an historic winter storm hit Jackson, Mississippi, leaving tens of thousands of residents without clean water, or without any water at all. Most of those residents were Black. Four weeks later, much of the capital city still has to boil water to drink. Eighty-two percent of the residents in Jackson are Black and nearly a third live in poverty. Over the past several decades, the city has not had enough money to fix its dilapidated water system.State lawmakers, whose leadership has always been white,  are debating how to address the water crisis before the end of the legislative session in just a few weeks; historically, state leaders have insisted that Jackson’s water problems are the city’s fault, and the city’s to fix. Many residents, including Jackson’s mayor, say race and racism play a big part in the struggle over the decades-long water crisis in Jackson.  If the city were majority-white, they say, this problem would have been fixed a long time ago.Host Trymaine Lee speaks with West Jackson resident Cassandra Welchlin, executive director of Mississippi Black Women’s Roundtable and an advocate for Black women and girls in the state.And Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba discusses the problem from his vantage point as the man in charge of the water crisis and the chief advocate for more money from the state to fix the crumbling system. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com Further Reading and ListeningA month without water: In Jackson, Mississippi, struggling residents fear next outageJackson, Mississippi, water crisis brings to light long-standing problems in cityUnder The Surface, Part One: Jackson Residents Struggle From Neglected Water System 
Jury System on Trial

Jury System on Trial

2021-03-1131:223

This week, jury selection began for the trial of Derek Chauvin, a former police office charged in the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis last summer.Juries hold tremendous power in our legal system. They determine who lives, who dies, and who goes free. The right to a jury of our peers is enshrined in the Constitution, guaranteeing us all the right to a “speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury.” And yet, juries in America remain overwhelmingly white, even in cases with Black victims and defendants. The Equal Justice Initiative found that white juries spend less time deliberating outcomes, consider fewer perspectives, and ultimately, make more errors. Will Snowden is watching closely; he’s a New Orleans public defender and founder of The Juror Project, an advocacy group dedicated to building fair and representative juries. He walks us through the challenges of building a fair jury in such a high-profile case. And Trymaine Lee speaks with Charlene Cooke, the sole Black juror on the trial for Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, charged with murdering Laquan McDonald in 2014. She talks about what it was like to be the only Black person in the room.Editors’ note: This episode incorrectly named the source of the video that captured the Laquan McDonald shooting. The piece has been updated to properly identify the video as police dashcam footage, not cell phone video. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening:After George FloydGrowing up on the block where George Floyd was killedInto an American Uprising: Keith Ellison on George Floyd's Death
The Vaccine Gap

The Vaccine Gap

2021-03-0424:542

Black Americans have been among the hardest hit by the coronavirus, but they aren't being vaccinated at the same rates as white Americans. Black people are receiving fewer than 7 percent of total vaccine doses, despite representing more than 13 percent of the population. This gap is often based on mistrust of the medical establishment, but there is more to the story. Issues of access mean many folks who want the vaccine, can’t get it.Janice Phillips tells Trymaine Lee she has been trying to get the vaccine for her 103-year-old mother for months. She and her mother live in Trenton, New Jersey, a city of 85,000 that is near half Black. She watched the news in frustration as she saw images of White residents getting their shots in surrounding suburbs. In New Jersey, just 4 percent of vaccine doses have gone to Black residents. So last month, the state launched a new effort that relies on members of the community to help close the access gap. It’s a community partnership that relies on faith leaders to help get communities of color vaccinated. Trymaine speaks with Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora about this new program. And Reverend Darrell Armstrong of Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton shares the story of how he helped get Janice Phillips and her centenarian mother vaccinated. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Listening:Vaccine equity: ‘Vulnerable populations plan’ a priority for state health leadersGovernor Phil Murphy visits COVID vaccination site in TrentonCOVID-19 has seriously impacted the Black churchCDC COVID Vaccination Tracker: Demographics 
In the final installment of Harlem on My Mind, Trymaine Lee learns about the legacy of playwright Abram Hill, who used his work to center Black characters, Black audiences, and Black communities unapologetically.Abram Hill co-founded the American Negro Theater in 1940, operating a small 150-seat theater from the basement of Harlem’s Schomburg Center. The American Negro Theater, also known as the ANT, would become a launch pad for stars like Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier, even as Hill’s name was largely lost to history.Trymaine tours the Schomburg Center with chief of staff Kevin Matthews, and sits down with Dr. Koritha Mitchell, an associate English professor at Ohio State University, to better understand Abram Hill and the ANT’s rise and fall.And we learn about the legacy Hill leaves behind. In the 1960s, the New Heritage Theater Group grew from the foundation of the ANT and has been going strong since. Voza Rivers is the group’s executive producer. Trymaine talks with him, as well as actor Anthony Goss, who appeared in a 2017 re-production of Hill’s hit play On Strivers’ Row. Rivers and Goss, two men forty years apart, describe how Hill’s commitment to community continues to resonate across generations.We also hear from Abram Hill, in his own words, thanks to audio recordings from Schomburg Center archives and the Hatch Billops Estate, as well as the Works Progress Administration Oral History collection at George Mason University Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Listening:Harlem on My Mind: Jacob LawrenceHarlem on My Mind: Arturo SchomburgHarlem on My Mind: Jessie Redmon Fauset 
In Part 3 of Into America’s Black History Month series, Harlem on My Mind, Trymaine Lee spotlights the influence of Jessie Redmon Fauset. Langston Hughes called her one of the midwives of the Harlem Renaissance, but few today remember her name.As literary editor for NAACP’s The Crisis magazine, Fauset fostered the careers of many notable writers of the time: poets Countee Cullen and Gwendolyn Bennet, novelist Nella Larsen, writer Claude McCay. Fauset was the first person to publish Langston Hughes, when The Crisis printed the poem The Negro Speaks of Rivers. Fauset was also a writer, penning essays and poems. She went on to write four novels, including There is Confusion (1924). Her focus on bourgeois characters and women’s ambition shaped the conversation about Black identity in Harlem at the time.Dr. Julia S. Charles, professor of English at Auburn University, sheds light on the full scope of Fauset’s work, including her complicated relationship with Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois and other notable Black thinkers. Author Morgan Jerkins describes how Fauset’s legacy has inspired her own work as a writer, editor, and resident of today’s Harlem.Special thanks to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com Further Reading and Listening:Harlem on My Mind: Jacob LawrenceHarlem on My Mind: Arturo SchomburgThe Forgotten Work of Jessie Redmon Fauset
Into America continues its Black History Month series, Harlem on My Mind, following four figures from Harlem who defined Blackness for themselves and what it means to be Black in America today. The series begins when Trymaine Lee acquires a signed print by Jacob Lawrence titled “Schomburg Library.”The Schomburg Center for Research and Black Culture is based in Harlem, but its roots are on the island of Puerto Rico with a little Afro Puerto Rican boy named Arturo Schomburg. Determined to collect a record of Black history that could tell us who we are and where we’ve been, Arturo Schomburg amassed a personal collection of 10,000 Black books, artwork and documents. That collection eventually became the Schomburg Center we know today, which is part of the New York Public Library system. Trymaine Lee speaks with Vanessa Valdés, author of Diasporic Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Shola Lynch, curator of the Moving Image and Recorded Sound Division of the Schomburg Center, and Arturo Schomburg’s grandson, Dean Schomburg to better understand who Arturo was and the impact of his legacy on Black identity and Black culture.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening:Harlem on My Mind: Jacob LawrenceVideo of Arturo Schomburg in the Schomburg’s original reading room, courtesy of the Schomburg Center’s YouTube pageDiasporic Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg by Vanessa Valdés
This Black History Month, Into America launches Harlem on My Mind, a series that follows four figures from Harlem who defined Blackness for themselves and what it means to be Black in America today.The story begins in December, when host Trymaine Lee acquires something he coveted for years: a numbered print titled Schomburg Library by American icon Jacob Lawrence. The print came with a handwritten dedication to a man named Abram Hill. Who was Abram Hill? How did he know Jacob Lawrence? Did their paths cross at the famed Schomburg Library?What follows is a journey of discovery, through conversations with friends, historians and experts, to understand the interconnected lives of Black creators in and around the Harlem Renaissance. And it starts with Jacob Lawrence, a child of the Great Migration who was nurtured by the great artists and ideas of the period. Two women who knew Lawrence well, art historian Dr. Leslie King-Hammond and artist Barbara Earl Thomas, reflect on his life, death and contributions to Black culture.Special thanks to the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com Further Reading and Listening:“The World of Jacob Lawrence:” Keynote Address by Dr. Leslie King-HammondA Seattle artist cuts through the chaos of the pandemicAn Interview with Jacob Lawrence
Reporting on Race

Reporting on Race

2021-01-2831:441

This week, President Biden outlined his commitment to addressing racial equity and righting historical wrongs. But Black journalists have been trying to sound the alarm on the consequences of racism and extremism for years. In predominantly white newsrooms, their calls were often met with skepticism and dismissiveness, and as a result, we’ve all paid the price. Journalist Farai Chideya has covered every presidential election since 1996. Her resume includes stints at CNN, ABC News, and FiveThirtyEight. She knows first-hand what it’s like to try to tell stories of racial animus, only to be silenced by white gatekeepers. In addition to being a journalist, Farai is also a media analyst. As a fellow with Harvard’s Shorenstein Center, she studied the lack of diversity in American newsrooms.Farai recently started her own newsroom, serving as creator and host of Our Body Politic, a politics podcast about women of color. It’s produced in collaboration with public radio stations KCRW, KPCC, and KQED. She joins Trymaine Lee to discuss the ways in which institutionalized bias in mainstream media led to inadequate coverage of race under Trump, and the lessons journalists need to keep in mind during the Biden administration.  Further Reading and Listening:Listen to Farai Chideya’s podcast Our Body PoliticBiden signs executive actions on racial equityInto America: Into Please Stop Talking to Me About Race
The violent insurrection against our nation’s Capitol building this month pulled an ugly truth to the surface, one that’s been hiding in plain sight for decades. White supremacist extremism is widespread, deep-rooted and a major threat to our security. In his inaugural address on Wednesday, President Joe Biden named white supremacy as a danger to our unity and vowed to defeat it. But law enforcement and government agencies have refused to acknowledge the full scope of the problem, especially when it appears within their own ranks. Will the attack earlier this month motivate the new administration to take this threat more seriously? Trymaine Lee sits down with Erroll Southers, a former federal agent and an expert in homegrown extremism at the University of Southern California. Southers lays out how white supremacist extremism was fostered over decades in this country, and the steps President Biden can take to begin to address the crisis.  Further Reading: Biden sworn in as president, calls on Americans to 'end this uncivil war' of political divisionThe Trump-fueled riot shocked America. To some, it was a long time coming.
The Undecided Election

The Undecided Election

2021-01-1532:122

Americans were told for months that results from the 2020 presidential election could take days, even weeks, to be confirmed. But there was little clarity on how it would all play out. For the first time in seven months, host Trymaine Lee hit the road for North Carolina, to track the Black vote in this crucial swing state. He found enthusiasm on a college campus, wary determination outside of polling places, and democracy in action as election workers gathered results in the bowels of an old courtroom. But as Election Day came and went without a clear winner, North Carolinians were left in limbo, waiting to find out who their state voted for. And all of America was left wondering which way our country is headed. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Watching: NBC News Decision Desk Live Blog Black men drifted from Democrats toward Trump in record numbers, polls show North Carolina Election Results 2020
American Coup

American Coup

2021-01-1532:111

The storming of the Capitol building by white extremists loyal to Donald Trump on January 6th, was violent, deadly and shameful.    But it wasn’t unprecedented. The attempt to overturn Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election follows a long tradition in America of white violence, aimed at undoing Democracy.   At nearly every turn, where this country bent toward freedom, there was a violent backlash. And there is perhaps no clearer example than the story of the only successful coup in U.S. history.  In 1898, white supremacists in Wilmington, North Carolina carried out a riot and insurrection, targeting Black lawmakers and residents.  Inez Campbell Eason’s family survived the coup, but Black lawmakers were ousted, dozens of Black residents were killed, and she tells Trymaine Lee that the impact on the city is still felt. Dr. Sharlene Sinegal-Decuir, African American History professor at Xavier University in New Orleans, explains the long history of white violence in response to progress. In order to prevent insurrections like the one last week in Washington, D.C., she says we must begin to understand our past. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.  Further Reading:White rioters at the Capitol got police respect. Black protestors got rubber bullets.Law enforcement and the military probing whether members took part in Capitol riotDemocrats grapple with how to impeach Trump without hindering Biden's agenda
A Fresh New Look

A Fresh New Look

2021-01-1502:46

This moment calls for us to be honest and truthful about who we are as Americans, who we’ve been and who we hope to become. And there’s no way to do that without examining the role, range and power of Blackness in America. Trymaine Lee introduces a new look that speaks to the hopes, anxieties and aspirations of Black America. 
On the afternoon of January 6th, the nation was gripped by the images of Trump supporters charging the Capitol building as Congress gathered to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win. These scenes brought to bear what so many democracy-loving people across this country have long feared, that Trump’s final days as President would end violently.  But hours earlier, attention was on the Georgia Senate races, where Democrat Reverend Raphael Warnock won his runoff election against Republican Kelly Loeffler. Rev. Warnock, the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, spiritual home of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., will become the first Black senator from the state of Georgia. He’ll be the second Black senator from the South since Reconstruction.  Jaime Harrison is a Warnock supporter. Harrison ran for Senate this year in South Carolina. He lost his race, but turned his attention to his political action committee, Dirt Road PAC, putting money behind Warnock and Jon Ossoff, who ran for and won Georgia’s other Senate seat. These dual victories mean Democrats take control of the US Senate this year.  Jaime Harrison joins Trymaine Lee to reflect on the significance of Warnock’s win and the path forward for Democrats. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: 1 shot dead, Congress evacuated, National Guard activated after pro-Trump rioters storm CapitolLoeffler's projected defeat in Georgia Senate election highlights failed Republican strategyJon Ossoff defeats David Perdue in Georgia, handing control of the Senate to Democrats, NBC News projectsInto the Fight for Lindsey Graham's Seat
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Comments (24)

Angela Johnson

Strong recommendation: The Sword and The Shield by Peniel Joseph as supplement to this episode

Apr 13th
Reply

Patricia J. Williams

Wow! Brother Lee... Wow! I always look forward to new episodes of your podcast Into America, but this particular episode was fantastic! Dr. B was amazing, brilliant, and a powerful voice for our community. This episode was life changing. Black Lives Matter is an affirmation said Dr. B... Yes!!!! Thank you for always bringing us your very best my brother! Blessing, light, and Black love!

Apr 9th
Reply

Tay Off The Top

AMAZING Ep. Classic!!!! Courage Is Our Calling!!!! Legendary👑💎👑

Apr 1st
Reply

John Massari

I get your point but, they're a lot of black heroes, John Stewart, Falcon, Black Panther, Blade, Cyborg, Black Lightning, Misty Knight, Luke Cage, Storm and those are only but a few. Black Panther and Falcon have both been around since the 60's. they were definitely Falcon action figures. However, I'm not going pretend that black action figures aren't under presented, but part of the issue is demand.

Dec 28th
Reply

gaby alseen

Why is it ok for a white kid to have dolls from different races? but Nola can't have a Jojo Siwa doll? As a Canadian this is so stupid and ehem. ...racist. I was really enjoying this podcast until this episode.

Dec 25th
Reply

Béné

Nola is so so smart, I'm sure she will do great things! She could have her own podcast :)

Dec 24th
Reply

Jen Jen

This is a GREAT podcast!

Dec 20th
Reply

bob

this week on "Everything is Racist!"...

Sep 24th
Reply (1)

bob

race bating jerkoff

Sep 10th
Reply

Tay Off The Top

Thanks!! #BidenHarris2020

Aug 12th
Reply

Sofa King

This woman can suck it for hating Bernie.

Jun 7th
Reply

Vicki Camacho

Lol!! ❤❤❤❤

Jun 7th
Reply

Vicki Camacho

You had me until you mentioned AL Sharpton. I must say the buildup was excellent until you mention him.

May 14th
Reply

Emmett Stokes

This is a well laid out and informative piece of reporting that laden with evidence of the demographic with ALL of the experience of this parcel of the fourth amendment ... unreasonable search and seizure. Although Blomberg is Billoinnaire, philanthropist and innovator, his innate decision with all the law enforcement officials reeks of undertone of racism and implicit biases.

Apr 29th
Reply

Fiona Fleming

really enjoying this

Mar 29th
Reply

Vicki Camacho

Louisiana 8 electrol college votes and Georgia has 16. All 16 of Georgia's electrol college went to Republicans.

Mar 21st
Reply

Susan Shinagawa

I, too, have been supporting Jaime and his campaign from California. The late Senator John McCain (R-AZ), a long time friend of Lindsay Graham, would be rolling over in his grave at how Lindsay has rolled his honor and principles over to the immature, hateful, narcissistic, self-serving Donald Trump. It's time Georgians send Graham home. I'm doing what I can to help Jaime Harrison become the new Junior Senator from the great state of Georgia. I encourage others to do so, too.

Mar 19th
Reply (1)

Julie Nance

Donating to him!!! Lindsay Graham has got to go. I'm not in South Carolina, but the entire country has to suffer from Graham being in the Senate and being a lap dog for Trump. Supporting Jamie from Utah.

Mar 10th
Reply (2)

Ann Wolterbeek Hawkins

well done, good info.

Feb 29th
Reply (1)
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