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Over the next two weeks I will be busy writing and editing an upcoming series called Ireland's Last Aristocrat. In the meantime I have dusted down two episodes I thought you might enjoy diving back into. This podcast was released in 2019. It's one of was the most listened to and generated the most feedback! It asks if the Great Hunger was a genocide.Become a supporter and join me on the trip to Conwy - https://www.patreon.com/irishpodcastTickets for this Saturdays live show in Waterford on Michael Collins are available here https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/irish-history-snugcast-history-from-the-high-stool-tickets-390149617007 Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Since the dawn of history humans have been intrigued by the weather. However while it has the potential to sustain or destroy life, our ability to accurately forecast it is very recent. In this podcast I am joined by meteorologists Evelyn Cusack and Noel Fitzpatrick to explain the fascinating history of weather forecasting. Our desire to predict the weather is a story driven by war, natural disasters, human ingenuity and super computers.You can find the Met Eireann podcast here https://www.met.ie/education/the-met-eireann-podcast/. The specific episode referenced by Noel in relation to Newgrange is available here https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-met-%C3%A9ireann-podcast/id1469018144Become a member on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/Irishpodcast and get access toMy upcoming exclusive series on the Civil War with Dr Brian HanleyJoin me on the supporters' trip to Conwy Castle in WalesEarly access to the showAd free episodesHours of supporters only content Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
The 1950s were a dismal time in Ireland. While the economy tanked, the catholic church, at the height of its power, maintained strict control over social life. Desperate to find a better life, nearly 500,000 Irish people emigrated. This staggering figure was equivalent to 80% of those born in the Free State between 1931 and 1941. This was a level of emigration unseen since the days of the Great Hunger of the 1840s.The vast majority went to Britain with many making London their home. However they found the English capital isolating, lonely and unwelcoming. The poster in boarding houses stating ‘No Dogs, No Blacks, No Irish’ embodied the racism they faced. While many of the 1950s generation are no longer with us, in the late 1990s author Catherine Dunne recorded their stories. The experiences of these emigrants were the basis for her book An Unconsidered People - the Irish in London. In this moving episode Catherine recounts the experiences they shared with her, the racism they faced as well as the isolation and loneliness. She also reveals the importance of solidarity within the Irish community, the legendary Irish clubs such as the Galtymore in Cricklewood and how many made a better life in the face of adversity.You can find Catherine’s book An Unconsidered People - the Irish in London at https://www.newisland.ie/nonfiction/an-unconsidered-people-the-irish-in-londonFollow Catherine’s catherinedunneauthor.comfacebook.com/Author.CatherineDunnetwitter.com/DunneCatherineBecome a member on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/Irishpodcast and getMy upcoming exclusive series on the Civil War with Dr Brian HanleyJoin me on the supporters' trip to Conwy Castle in WalesEarly access to the showAd free episodesHours of supporters only content Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
A voicenote from Fin

A voicenote from Fin

2022-07-2905:51

Hey folks, I have a few important announcements for you:🎙️🎙️Starting in September supporters (at the $5 tier or more) will receive an exclusive series on the Civil War with Dr Brian Hanley from Trinity College Dublin. You can hear more on this above. Become a supporter to get the seriesPatreon - Patreon.com/irishpodcastAcast+ - https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory🛥️🏰I am delighted to invite announce my a supporters' trip to Wales to visit the stunning Conwy Castle. Conwy is spectacular - you can see a video here https://irishhistorypodcast.ie/video-tour-of-conwy-castle-wales/. If you are a supporter (or become one!) on Acast+ or Patreon and would like to join me, I am currently looking for expressions of interest from you for a trip in September or early October. Let me know on patreon or at info@irishhistorypodcast.ie if you are interested.🎙️ 🍻Live Show - I am doing a live show with Snugcast in Phil Grimes pub, Waterford on August 20th. There are only 30 tickets available for this special event. Get yours now here. https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/irish-history-snugcast-history-from-the-high-stool-tickets-390149617007 Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
In the series finale 'Redemption', we follow Ellen's life in Australia where a strange and unexpected redemption awaits.Support the show:Patreon https://patreon.com/IrishpodcastAcast+ https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThis week's special supporters are:Z HammingR DownesE ZimmerG HickeyR HurleyM NuttyE RusheP KopfC WilsonJ GuthK McNamaraM KellyL RosewoodD GleasonC StapletonMJ BrodieG Robertson Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
The trials are over, the sentences have been passed down and there is nothing left but the punishment. However as we have seen in the story so far, this is story is if anything unpredictable.Support the show:Patreon https://patreon.com/Irishpodcast Acast+ https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThis week's special supporters areStephenAM MulhernB DonohoeK ConnollyS WallG BrowneD HealyB ClearyP LynchL AndersonK L MayerE LewisE JordanD Hensey Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Given the popularity of true crime genre, we are increasingly familiar with how murder investigations work in the 21st century. However they were quite different in the 19th century. In the third deep dive of Murder at Mother Mountain I am joined by Dr Niamh Howlin to explain how murder investigations & trials worked in the 1840s. Niamh is an expert on 19th century law and she explains how the process worked before DNA, forensics or even the concept of a trial by a jury of our peers existed! Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
The trial begins in Nenagh Courthouse in August 1846. What lies ahead for the accused is more uncertain than ever - murder in 19th century Ireland carries the death sentence.Get add free early access to the next episode and help fund the show Patreon https://patreon.com/Irishpodcast Acast+ https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThis week's special supporters are B FlahertyE FogartyH LewisC RowlandD BrowneP ForanP HurleyC Wright P MeagherM McLoughlinA DunneA PhilbrickK Finn M GrayJ NixonK O'Connor Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
In part 2 of Murder at Mother Mountain Ellen’s life changes forever on March 10th 1846 when the violence that overshadowed her life finally comes to her door...Support the showwww.patreon.com/irishpodcasthttps://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThis week's special supporters are M ReneeD Mosier A DacyA O'Brien M KellyJ A C McGowanK L. Daly E LaurentB WalshD Hill C BleakleyM LynchA JamesonG B. LaneG B Lane Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
To accompany Murder at Murder Mountain, I am releasing five deep dive episodes which delve into the history of the early 19th century Ireland in greater detail. These will be released between the main episodes. This is deep dive looks at the pre-Famine catholic church. While religion was very important during Ellen Kennedy's childhood, the catholic church emerging from centuries of repression was a very different organsation than it is today. In this podcast Salvador Ryan, professor of Ecclesiastical History in Maynooth, discusses religion and wider spiritual beliefs in the decades before the famine. He also explains why rituals surrounding pattern days and ancient holy wells (also mentioned in episode one) were frowned on by the church hierarchy. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Ellen Kennedy was born into in Western Tipperary in 1803. Her youth was one nurtured by violence. Hunger and food shortages were common. The stark inequalities lead to frequent outbreaks of violence. In this deeply unequal society young women like Ellen faced the threat of abduction and forced marriage.Ellen however was far from average...Support the show and get early access to the next episode. Patreon http://patreon.com/irishpodcast Acast+ https://play.acast.com/s/irishhistoryAdditional Research - Liam CostelloAdditional narrations - Aidan Crowe and Therese MurrayTheme tune - The Banks of SullanePerformed by Nell Ní ChróinínUilleann Pipes Pipes - Liam CostelloThis week's special supporters areP LynchA HannumM BushertS GrayS WinsorK NeueN BarryB DuffyM O'DonnellA FungeB NicholsonB PoonJ GladdenThe J & L showM Guinane Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Ellen Kennedy was born into in Western Tipperary in 1803. Her youth was one nurtured by violence…Listen to an exclusive preview of episode 1 now at https://patreon.com/irishpodcast or Acast+https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Over the last decade there has been countless events to mark the centenary of the Irish Revolution. However 2022 is also the 175th anniversary of Black ‘47, one of worst years of the Great Hunger. This has received little or no attention. This begs the question does the Great Famine matter anymore or is it fading in to the distant past?In this podcast I looked at the impact of the Great Famine, asking what if any meaning it has for day to day life in the 21st century. Sources mentioned:The school's folklore collection is available at https://www.duchas.ie/en/cbesMy series on the great Famine is available here https://irishhistorypodcast.ie/category/podcast/the-great-famine/The article on the Year of Slaughter - the Famine of the 1740s is available here https://irishhistorypodcast.ie/1741-the-year-of-slaughter/The Special Supporters for this episode are S SteinkerchnerK ChapmanA Stewart-MailhiotK SamarB O'DonovanK Costello B Dunphy TarabuJ DonelanJ.M. CulverW Edwards D Lawall T McCool J LavinD Federman Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Ireland has some very strange place names. They range from the perplexing – Skeoghvosteen in Kilkenny, to the scandalous - Slutsend in Dublin and Bastardstown in Co Wexford. But where do these names come from and what do they tell us about our history? Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
When you think of the Middle Ages what springs to mind? Medieval battles, warfare and general hardship? Certainly not fun. However while medieval Ireland was a violent place by any standard people were still able to enjoy themselves. In this episode I explore what our medieval ancestors did for fun. From football to archery, poetry to the pub they knew how to have a good time! Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Traditional music is central to Irish culture and identity in the 21st century. Contrary to what we might think, this is a relatively recent development. As late as the 1960s Trad was perceived as unfashionable and musicians were not allowed to play in pubs. 60 years later it has become extremely popular and recognised the world over. So what happen?Last weekend I sat down with Tom Mulligan, a legend in Trad scene to talk about the history of Trad over the century. Tom hales from a well known musical family and owns the Cobblestone, the best known traditional music pub in the country. Indeed it was become something of a cultural institution over the last 35 years. In this interview Tom explains the roots of modern trad from Poland, Africa, the USA and back to Ireland. He also elaborates on the intriguing story of how trad went from a marginal genre in Irish society to its contemporary popularity.While Trad has enjoyed a resurgence in recent decades, it faces an uncertain future in the 2020s. Property speculation in Dublin has seen numerous live music venues close in recent years to make way for hotels. There are fewer and fewer spaces for musicians in the city. Last year saw Tom's pub the Cobblestone became the latest to be earmarked for 'development'. Given its historic role in developing and nurturing trad music, this provoked large demonstrations and a campaign #dublinisdying. While the plans to build a hotel on the site were withdrawn last week, Tom explains how the Cobblestone is not out of the woods yet.Follow the Cobblestone on twitter and Insta Music by Liam CostelloSupport the show at Patreon.com/irishpodcast or https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThis week's special supporters areT Troy S LucasAlexanderW McGuireC Steuland T HigginsR SpowartD BohanGregP McKeyP MyersB BradyB McDonoughK StaufferM MulvaleT Murray Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
This live podcast pokes in to the darker corners of the past looking at life in Victorian Waterford. Recorded live in Katty Barry’s in Waterford, it's a strange journey through macabre inquests that took place in pubs through to dentists who peddled cocaine!The second half of the podcast looks at a bizarre murder involving a veteran of the Famine.Support your historywww.patreon.com/irishpodcastThis week's special supporters areA MurphyM CallaghanE KelleherD DwyerA RogersM MaloneL O'BrienWJ MurphyC DoranJ O'HaganM DwyerS QuinnR MorseM DurkinS Reddin Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Stephen’s Green is one of Dublin’s well known areas. Located in the heart of the city centre, the Green is home to several prestigous instiutions and businesses including the Royal College of Surgeons, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Shelbourne Hotel. It's history however is very different. Originally a swampy marshland, it was home to numerous brothels and the city gallows. In this podcast I am joined by historian Frank Hopkins to explore the history of St Stephen's Green. We begin on the gallows as Frank explains how public executions were a form of entertainment for many Dubliners. Then moving through the centuries Frank explains who the notorious bodysnatchers of Goat Alley were and the history behind Copperfaced Jack, the man after whom the famous night club is named.The show ends by introducing a certain A Hitler who was regular sight around St Stephens Green in the early 20th century! You can find Frank’s excellent book St Stephen's Green: A History of the Green online and in all good bookshops. What does 50/13 mean? With your support I am planning on releasing 50 episodes this year. 13 is the number of episodes I have produced so far with your support so we are on track! You can support the show and get ad free episodes, early access to the show and exclusive episodes.Each week I acknowledge listeners who support the show. This week's special supporters areThe week's special supporters are:J Arbaugh D Eggleston M Fields W Tolan S Corbet R D Moore L Slavens J Reilly C Donoghue D D Rau J BatesD Celment B Conneely J LooneyR Morahan B White Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Irland Redaktion was a Nazi radio station established during the Second World War. It's sole purpose was to shape and influence Irish public opinion in favour of the Nazis. In this episode I am joined by William Quinlan, the winner of the Irish History Summit RSR competition. William, a stuident in St Jospeph's College Borrisoleigh, wrote his R.S.R. (Research Study Report) on Irland Redaktion. In this podcast he details the fascinating story of this little known station, explaining why it was initially broadcast in Irish, what the Nazis hoped to achieve and if it was successful. Over the last three months I have increased the number of podcasts by one third on the same period last year. This is due to the support of listeners like you who support the show on Acast+ and Patreon. They allow me to dream bigger and make a better show. In recognition of this each week I will be listing patrons of the show as special supporters of episodes in the coming weeks and months. You can get onboard and help the show atPatreon - https://patreon.com/IrishpodcastAcast - https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistoryThe week's special supporters are:R McCormickI Wöstemeyer A O'BrienM BradyJ FordN ReillyM MullaneyN FeelyJ FitzGeraldF D’ArcyC T MorganC O’NeillK CrossmanC BrennanD GleesonA O'BrienM BradyJ Ford Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
What did Dublin look like before the authorities demolished the medieval city? How did Irish people address Queen Victoria during the Famine?The answers to these questions lie in documents stored in Dublin City Library's archives which chronicles 800 years of life in the city. Until now the only way to access the archive and it's fascinating stories was to go in person to Pearse Street Library. That is all about to change. This week sees the launch of a ground breaking project as Dublin City Library and Archive publish 50,000 documents online. Better still they are asking history fans across the world to help transcribe this archive.In this podcast librarian Padraic Stack brings you behind the scenes in the archive. He tells the fascinating stories of letters to the Queen during the Famine and how medieval Dublin was demolished. He also explains how you (yes you!) can get involved in transcribing these documents from the comfort of your home. Its a rare opportunity to get dirty in Dublin's archives! The link referenced in the show is here.  Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/irishhistory.
Comments (53)

Darren Merlehan

Great story and a great podcast.love the voice of Finn Dwyer the best voice I've heard tell a story clear and soothing. i listen at night and fall asleep sometime after.super podcast Irish history podcast. *****

Jul 3rd
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Tim O'Mahony

excellent podcast!!

Oct 21st
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Clint Upham

I guess the crazy idea of this being cultivated in a lab being written off as just a conspiracy theory didn't age too well hey haha

Aug 6th
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ronan joyce

Great podcast,keep up the good work.

Mar 4th
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Mike Coffey

Any ideas of what the phrase, "doing maggie's work" means?

Feb 25th
Reply

Adam fredrick93

Podchraoladh iontach coinnigh leis an dea-obair. 👍

Dec 7th
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dMichelle Garland

Thanks so much for all the hard work you and your crew put into the making of this series (and others). I am seriously enjoying the education!

Nov 11th
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Kenneth Reid

Hi great podcast but no viable fens or very little natural bogs left on the bog of Allen.

Oct 26th
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Charles Francis Drake

Great idea, great series...

Aug 20th
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Paul McHugh

it was a genocide you prick, they knew the Irish would perish in huge numbers, they said it at the time, you absolute vomit , if you locked your dog in the shed and sold his food to your neighbor, it's not free market trading, you killed a dog, simple as

May 21st
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Antoinette O' Sullivan

I really enjoyed that, thank you! I've never really gotten into podcasts but was recommended yours by a friend recently, and have just listened to these two and the 1916 calm before the storm. Excellent! Looking forward to the Maamtransa one - it's always fascinated me, but I'd never heard of William Sheehan. If you ever get the chance, have a look at Lady Albina Broderick, her story is unreal, I'd love to hear you tell it some day. It's not a murder one! She was just a very unique lady. Go raibh maith agat! Your podcasts will hopefully get me through this quarantine time :)

Mar 25th
Reply (1)

Rebecca Pierce

I had a hard time understanding Damian...next time.please.have him.slow down and not shout...ha...but what an amazing history lesson! Thank you for helping me understand my Irish ancestry...My Stephen Pierce arrived between 1848 and 1852..amd settled in Camden Nj...but I have no record of his entry...he would have been about 15 or 18...we think he came alone...

Feb 6th
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Cormac Sheedy

fantastic show will only keep getting better .

Jan 21st
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James ONeal

i just love my ancesteral historical,histories.LOONG LIVE ULSTERS

Nov 26th
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Anne Shore

you're wellcome see you tonight

Jun 29th
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Paul Cahoon

is the glogheen workhouse on the road to Mitchelstown, were the wall still stands?

Jun 9th
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Will Unknown

WHAT FAMINE

Apr 1st
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Emma Fennell

Is there a follow up to this? really interesting, thanks.

Mar 12th
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Joe Kelly

thank you. Very interesting insight into life back then

Feb 25th
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Charles Barnes

it is curious that you said the superstitious pagans must have come up with that description of chorea, when Christians are just as superstitious. a difference between these two groups might have been in the response, such as avoiding east Ireland vs proselytizing the area. I don't have sources on that nor can I be sure about predicting the behaviour of human beings, especially from that context. Thanks for the show

Feb 7th
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