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JAMA Clinical Reviews

Author: JAMA Network

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Author interviews that explore the latest clinical reviews.
252 Episodes
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Routine wellness or "checkup" visits are popular with patients and physicians but questions persist about their value, goals, and effective components. JAMA Associate Editor Anne Cappola, MD, ScM, discusses the evidence for and against the practice with Jeffrey Linder, MD, MPH, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and Allan S. Brett, MD, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Related Content: General Health Checks in Adult Primary Care
Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects approximately 8.5 million people in the US and about 230 million worldwide. JAMA Deputy Editor Greg Curfman, MD, interviews Mary M. McDermott, MD, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, to discuss current evidence regarding diagnosis and optimal medical treatment of people with PAD to prevent cardiovascular events, improve walking impairment, and prevent lower extremity ischemic events such as amputation or limb ischemia. Related Article(s): Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease Without Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia
Interview with Aaron B. Caughey, MD, PhD, USPSTF member and coauthor of Behavioral Counseling Interventions for Healthy Weight and Weight Gain in Pregnancy: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Related Content: Counseling and Behavioral Interventions for Healthy Weight and Weight Gain in Pregnancy: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force Behavioral Interventions for Healthy Weight Gain During Pregnancy
Interview with Michael Barry, MD, USPSTF vice chairperson and author of Screening for Colorectal Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Related Article(s): Screening for Colorectal Cancer
Headache disorders are one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms and medical offices. Matthew S. Robbins, MD, associate professor of neurology and neurology residency program director at Weill Cornell and New York Presbyterian Hospital, discusses effective migraine treatment approaches. Related Content: Diagnosis and Management of Headache
Headache is one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms and medical offices. Matthew S. Robbins, MD, associate professor of neurology and neurology residency program director at Weill Cornell and New York Presbyterian Hospital, discusses the diagnostic approach to headache with a focus on distinguishing migraine from other primary headache disorders. Related Content: Diagnosis and Management of Headache
Chronic stable angina reduces quality of life and only rarely leads to acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Treatment is lifestyle modification to manage atherosclerotic risk factors, with revascularization (eg, PCI or CABG) indicated to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life only once medical therapy is maximized. James De Lemos, MD, professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, summarizes these and other aspects of chronic stable angina management. Related Content: Diagnosis and Management of Stable Angina
Interview with John B. Wong, MD, USPSTF member and coauthor of USPSTF Recommendation: Screening for Hypertension in Adults Related Content: Screening for Hypertension in Adults The 2021 USPSTF Recommendation on Blood Pressure Screening USPSTF Recommendation: Screening for Hypertension in Adults USPSTF Recommendation Statement on Hypertension Screening in Adults Hypertension Screening Recommendation and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Blood Pressure Control USPSTF Recommendations for Screening for Hypertension in Adults Patient Information: Screening for Hypertension in Adults The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Control Hypertension Hypertension, Obesity, and COVID-19
Dual antiplatelet therapy, typically aspirin and an oral P2Y12 receptor inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor, cangrelor), reduces adverse events after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) but choice of agent and optimal duration may be patient-specific. Umair Khalid, MD, a cardiologist at the Baylor School of Medicine in Houston, discusses how to use these agents in management of ACS. Related Article(s): Oral Antiplatelet Therapy After Acute Coronary Syndrome
Interest in space travel has increased since SpaceX’s first commercial launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in May 2020 and with efforts to send humans to Mars. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, MD, MPH, a physician-astronaut who completed a 6-month mission to the ISS in 2018 and is associate professor of clinical medicine at LSU Health Sciences Center in Baton Rouge and associate program director for the Aerospace Medicine Residency Program at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston, discusses how the human body and mind adapt to life in space. Related Content: Do Apollo Astronaut Deaths Shine a Light on Deep Space Radiation and Cardiovascular Disease?
Interest in space travel has increased since SpaceX’s first commercial launch to the International Space Station in May 2020 and with efforts to send humans to Mars. Jim Bagian, MD, a physician-astronaut who logged 337 hours in space between 1989 and 1991, is director of the Center for Healthcare Engineering and Patient Safety at the University of Michigan and discusses the effects of space travel on the human body and physiologic readjustments on return to earth. Related Content: Do Apollo Astronaut Deaths Shine a Light on Deep Space Radiation and Cardiovascular Disease?
Shyam Prabhakaran, MD, chairman of neurology at the University of Chicago, discusses the diagnosis and evaluation of patients who present with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke. Related Article: Diagnosis and Management of Transient Ischemic Attack and Acute Ischemic Stroke
Semaglutide has recently been shown to induce clinically significant weight loss in patients with obesity that is sustained for as long as the drug is given. Tom Wadden, PhD, from the University of Pennsylvania, discusses results from the series of recent STEP trials and how they compare to the effects of other medications used to treat obesity. Related Articles: Effect of Subcutaneous Semaglutide vs Placebo as an Adjunct to Intensive Behavioral Therapy on Body Weight in Adults With Overweight or Obesity Effect of Continued Weekly Subcutaneous Semaglutide vs Placebo on Weight Loss Maintenance in Adults With Overweight or Obesity
Performing repeated statistical comparisons on data can result in false-positive findings. Jing Cao, PhD, associate professor of statistics at Southern Methodist University, explains problems that can arise from multiple testing procedures and how to avoid making false conclusions. Related Article: Multiple Comparison Procedures
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a clinical syndrome of vague abdominal pain and cramping associated with diarrhea or constipation. IBS is a diagnosis of exclusion, and a variety of treatments can improve its symptoms. Michael Camilleri, MD, professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, discusses recent advances in the diagnosis and management of IBS. Related Content: Diagnosis and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are the first of many being tested for widespread use. Buddy Creech, MD, MPH, director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program, reviews these and other vaccines likely to become available, including products that use inactivated, protein subunit, and viral vector immunization strategies. Related Content: SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines
Advance Directives

Advance Directives

2021-02-2632:48

Advance directives (ADs) allow patients to express their medical treatment preferences. Patients with ADs are more likely to receive medical care concordant with their wishes and are less likely to die in the hospital than patients without them, but use remains low in the US. Maria Silvera, MD, a palliative care physician and associate professor of medicine at the University of Michigan, and Catherine Auriemma, MD, a fellow in pulmonary/critical care medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, discuss the importance of ADs and strategies to increase their uptake. Related Article: Completion of Advance Directives and Documented Care Preferences During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic
The CDC coordinated a massive effort to immunize nearly all nursing home and long-term care facility residents in the US against COVID-19 infection in the month after vaccine approval. Ruth Link-Gelles, PhD, MPH, CDC staff epidemiologist and Lieutenant Commander of the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, describes how. Related Article(s): First-Dose COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents and Staff Nursing Homes’ Next Test—Vaccinating Workers Against COVID-19
Highly effective B-cell therapies like rituximab and ofatumumab have changed the outlook for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Alexander Rae-Grant, MD, emeritus professor of neurology at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, discusses recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of MS. Related Article(s): Diagnosis and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis Progress in Multiple Sclerosis Research
This is Dr Howard Bauchner, Editor in Chief of JAMA and the JAMA Network. The podcast on structural racism based on the discussion between Dr Ed Livingston and Dr Mitch Katz has been withdrawn.  Comments made in the podcast were inaccurate, offensive, hurtful, and inconsistent with the standards of JAMA.  Racism and structural racism exist in the US and in health care.  After careful consideration, I determined that the harms caused by the podcast outweighed any reason for the podcast to remain available on the JAMA Network.  I once again apologize for the harms caused by this podcast and the tweet about the podcast.  We are instituting changes that will address and prevent such failures from happening again.
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Comments (16)

tim jennings

I'm unsure why this podcast episode was published. The host spends the entirety of the episode fighting over the word racism because he thinks racism is illegal and doesn't exist anymore. That's very clearly not the case (we just had Trump as a president, BLM marches, and insane COVID-19 disparities) so maybe he's not the right guy to be hosting something related to structural racism? The guest was okay but because the host was so caught up on the racism word, they got nothing accomplished over 15 minutes and made a fool of themselves in the name of JAMA.

Mar 4th
Reply

Amirhossein Azari Jafari

that was such a wonderful story. I was on my cancer article while I was listening to this episode and honestly I shocked and it got me to think carefully. Dr. Stern, deep down in my heart, I wish u the best, Do not lose your hope and always be strong.

Aug 23rd
Reply

Lucy K

I guess this podcast got it totally wrong. Tunnel vision.

Apr 10th
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Prasad Chalasani

Shockingly bad advice — “asymptomatic people don’t need to wear masks in a grocery store”. It’s been established that people shed virus for up to as much as a week before showing symptoms, if the develop them at all. This advice is doing a huge disservice, I urge you to fix this

Apr 6th
Reply (2)

zahra aghajanzadeh

.

Mar 21st
Reply

Jon Elliott

such crap. no mention of the well-known and understood cause and cure of CAD - DIET AND LIFESTYLE. No surprise that OMT has limited and minimal efficacy when the engine of CAD us left running.

Mar 8th
Reply

Nuage Laboratoire

text

Mar 1st
Reply

Yasmine C

Unprofessional behavior leads to complications?! who woulda thunk it?

Feb 28th
Reply

Christal Cooper

didn't ask for this movies

Feb 28th
Reply

Matt Bowen

God Bless the American Soldier

Nov 28th
Reply (1)

Nathan Birch

9 d

Jul 25th
Reply (1)

Rodrigo Py

Amazing, episode!

May 21st
Reply
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