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LSE: Public lectures and events
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LSE: Public lectures and events

Author: London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.
851 Episodes
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Speaker(s): Dr. Aaron Reeves, Laura Lane, Daphine Aikens | Welcome to LSE’s award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists and other experts to answer an intelligent question. In this episode, Joanna Bale asks ‘Why do we need food banks?’ She talks to LSE’s Aaron Reeves and Laura Lane, as well as Daphine Aikens, founder and CEO of Hammersmith and Fulham food bank, and some of her clients.
Speaker(s): Michael O'Sullivan | The liberal, globalised world order is withering according to Michael O'Sullivan in his new book The Levelling: What's Next After Globalization which he will talk about in this lecture. The levelling is the process of ironing out imbalances like indebtedness and inequality, and proposing new ideas and frameworks to kickstart the next world order. The Levelling will involve the levelling of political accountability and responsibility between political leaders and “the people”, the levelling of institutional power—away from central banks and defunct twentieth-century institutions such as the WTO and IMF and toward new treaties (on risk and monetary policy) and new institutions (for example, a truly effective and powerful climate body and an institution or agreement that oversees cybersecurity). It will also involve the levelling out of wealth between rich and poor countries and between the very rich and “the rest,” preferably with “the rest” enjoying both better organic growth and a greater share of this growth. Then the levelling out of power between nations and regions is what the concept of the multipolar world is about, and within it, different regions will have different reserves of power. Michael O’Sullivan, is the former chief investment officer at Credit Suisse. Michael joined Credit Suisse in July 2007 from State Street Global Markets. Prior to joining Credit Suisse, Michael spent over ten years as a global strategist at a number of sell-side institutions and has also taught finance at Princeton and Oxford Universities. He was educated at University College Cork in Ireland and Balliol College in Oxford, where he obtained M.Phil and D.Phil degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He was an independent member of Ireland's National Economic Social Council from 2011 to 2016 Thomas Sampson is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELevelling
Speaker(s): David Miliband | This year’s Maurice Fraser annual lecture will take the form of a conversation between David Miliband and Professor Kevin Featherstone, followed by questions from the audience. The discussion will assess the state of play of the UK’s attempt to find a parliamentary majority for leaving the EU, and put into geopolitical context the choices and the stakes in the negotiations about our future relations with our European neighbours. David Miliband (@DMiliband) is the President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee and former British Foreign Secretary. He oversees the agency’s relief and development operations in over 30 countries, its refugee resettlement and assistance programs throughout the United States and the IRC’s advocacy efforts in Washington and other capitals on behalf of the world’s most vulnerable people. From 2007 to 2010, he served as the youngest Foreign Secretary in the United Kingdom, in three decades. In 2016 David was named one of the World’s Greatest Leaders by Fortune Magazine and in 2018 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. David Miliband is also the author of the upcoming book, Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics. He is the Director of the Hellenic Observatory and Co-Chair of LSEE: Research on South-East Europe within the European Institute The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Speaker(s): Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Sen | To ensure that people live long and healthy lives it is important to know what kills different groups of people in different places. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) based on the Disability-Adjusted Life Year has been developed to do this. This lecture shows how this measure leads to various anomalies and biases, in particular it underestimates the health problems experienced by women and children. Sudhir Anand is Research Director of Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Director of the International Inequalities Institute and Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on "Social Commitment and Democracy”. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEvaColorni
Speaker(s): Valerie Jarrett | Join Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama in conversation with LSE's Peter Trubowitz about her new book. When Valerie Jarrett interviewed a promising young lawyer named Michelle Robinson in July 1991 for a job in Chicago city government, neither knew that it was the first step on a path that would end in the White House. Jarrett soon became Michelle and Barack Obama’s trusted personal adviser and family confidante; in the White House, she was known as the one who “got” him and helped him engage his public life. Jarrett joined the White House team on January 20, 2009 and departed with the First Family on January 20, 2017, and she was in the room–in the Oval Office, on Air Force One, and everywhere else–when it all happened. No one has as intimate a view of the Obama Years, nor one that reaches back as many decades, as Jarrett shares in Finding My Voice. Valerie Jarrett (@ValerieJarrett) was the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama for his eight years in office. She now serves as a Senior Advisor to both the Obama Foundation and Attn:, Senior Distinguished Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and President of the Board of When We All Vote. Her book, Finding My Voice, debuted on the New York Times Bestsellers list this year. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJarrett
Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Speaker(s): Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg | The Annual Economica Coase lecture is jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg is Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale University and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group. She is former Vice-President of the American Economic Association and President elect of the Econometric Society (for 2021). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of both Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Sloan Research Fellowships, and recipient of the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER – currently on leave) and board member of the Bureau of Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). From 2011-2017 she was Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She has published widely in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, development, and industrial organization. She holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a Diplom from the University of Freiburg, Germany. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics, Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal, covering research in all branches of economics. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoase
Molyneux's Problem [Audio]

Molyneux's Problem [Audio]

2019-06-0301:22:35

Speaker(s): Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenney | William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch. If this person could suddenly see, would they be able to distinguish these objects by sight alone? This seventeenth-century thought experiment, known as ‘Molyneux’s problem’, received attention from some of philosophy’s greatest minds. We discuss how thinkers like Locke and Leibniz, as well as artists with visual impairments, responded to Molyneux’s challenge. Marjolein Degenaar is the author of Molyneux’s Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Form. Barry Ginley is Equality and Access Adviser, Victoria & Albert Museum. Brian Glenney is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Norwich University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and a Teaching Fellow in Philosophy, UCD The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
Speaker(s): Dr Jonathan Hopkin | At this year’s Annual Lecture, which marks the 10th anniversary of LEQS and follows just days after this year’s European parliamentary elections, Jonathan Hopkin will discuss the recent ruptures in the politics of the rich democracies, signalled by electoral instability across Europe, as well as dramatic events like the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Dr Hopkin argues that these tumultuous political developments are a consequence of a longer-term crisis of market liberalism, resulting from the abandonment of the post-war model of egalitarian capitalism in the 1970s. This shift in politics entailed weakening the democratic process in favor of an opaque, technocratic form of governance that allows voters little opportunity to influence policy. With the financial crisis of the late 2000s, these arrangements became unsustainable, as incumbent politicians were unable to provide solutions to economic hardship. Electorates demanded change, and it had to come from outside the system. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is an LSE Fellow in EU Politics at LSE’s European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope
Replication Crisis? [Audio]

Replication Crisis? [Audio]

2019-05-2801:28:071

Speaker(s): Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafò | The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the last number of years, scientists have replicated a number of established, high-profile experiments and produced different results. Does it point to serious flaws and biases in the sciences? Or is it evidence of the power of science to self-correct? And what can be done to make science more replicable? We explore whether the replication crisis undermines our trust in science. Alexander Bird is Peter Sowerby Professor of Philosophy and Medicine, KCL. Laura Fortunato is Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford. Marcus Munafò is Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol. Jonathan Birch is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
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Comments (18)

Rich Belsky

horrible audio... why bother :((((

Jul 17th
Reply

Joanna Francis

Rich Belsky : (

Jul 17th
Reply

Rob

The occult features of a boring talk.

May 7th
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Ankur Motwani

why are the podcasts not working ? everyother podcast is playable but this is not working

Mar 16th
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Mir Usman Ali

Ankur Motwani having the same problem. tried other podcast players also... didn't help!

Apr 12th
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Ankur Motwani

Ankur Motwani Anyone who's podcast is not working for lse, go to lse website and you can listen it there. Download also.

Apr 10th
Reply

George Av

the host was pretty awful. hurried up, kept cutting off the guests.

Mar 6th
Reply

Kaka

Grameen banks have seen its inception in many countries especially in India where Grameen banking is now present in many cities. Still we see distress in agro sector and framers suicide is on the rise. what are the reason and possible solutions.

Feb 22nd
Reply

bone day

44'55"Q&A

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

42'10"inclusive organizations are attainable,focus on experience and needs

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

34'00"general approach to design thinking

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

25'30"design thinking

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

10'30" any difference between diversity and inclusion?

Nov 11th
Reply

Adrian O'Looney

tzdg3

Sep 20th
Reply

Kronen Bing

very informative and promotes much needed debate

Dec 30th
Reply

Jūratė J

i think that teaching your kid to socialize is very important. and you're not gonna become global citizen without knowing how to communicate. you may write books of bullshit, but your real actions show your values:)

Sep 29th
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