DiscoverLSE: Public lectures and events
LSE: Public lectures and events
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LSE: Public lectures and events

Author: London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.
824 Episodes
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Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights [Audio]
Speaker(s): Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakaria | In 2019, Save the Children celebrates 100 years of working at the interface of politics, humanitarianism, and children’s rights. What does the future hold? Bringing together a panel of leading experts, the conversation will analyse how children's rights have transformed over the last 100 years. We will consider how the relationship between politics and humanitarianism is changing amidst transformations in the global ideological landscape, and where this leaves us for the future. Mike Aaronson (@MikeAaronson) was Director General of Save the Children UK 1995-2005. Maryam Ahmed graduated as a youth ambassador for Save the Children Nigeria in 2018. She has advocated for children's rights in Nigeria and in international forums. She particularly campaigns to end child marriage and sexual abuse, and to ensure girls have access to education and reproductive rights. Mary Robinson served as President of Ireland (1990-97) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Rafia Zakaria (@rafiazakaria) is an author and attorney, she served on the Board of Amnesty International USA for two terms between 2009-2015 and was the first Pakistani-American woman to do so. Alcinda Honwana is an LSE Centennial Professor and Inter-Regional Adviser at UN DESA. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSESave #SCconf100 Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights.
Inequality, Brexit and the End of Empire [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Hutton | In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union – but has yet to leave its Empire past behind. What part did the long afterlife of the world’s largest-ever Empire play in Britain’s view of itself and world? And could a post-EU Britain, against all the odds, become less unequal? Join us as four eminent scholars turn their attention to often overlooked elements in the story – Britain’s past imperial might, jingoism, mythmaking and racism; deep-set anxieties about change and conflicting visions of the future – and the possibility of an unexpected outcome, namely that its shock to the national system may slow or even reverse the decades-long rise of inequality. In their new co-authored book Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire, Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson argue that while Brexit will almost certainly require the UK to confront its own “shocking, Dorian Gray-like deteriorated image”, “out of the ashes of Brexit could, should and perhaps will come a chastened, less small-minded, less greedy future. There are good reasons to be hopeful.” Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. He is author of books including Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone and All That Is Solid: How the Great Housing Disaster Defines Our Times, and What We Can Do About It. Sally Tomlinson is Emeritus Professor at Goldsmiths University of London and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. She is author of books including A Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education: Exploring the Manufacture of Inability and Education and Race from Empire to Brexit. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. She is author of books including Connected Sociologies: Theory for a Global Age. Will Hutton (@williamnhutton) is principal of Hertford College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester Business School. Bev Skeggs(@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology and Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute. The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is one of seven Atlantic Fellowships around the world, committed to building a global community of leaders working together to advance equity, justice and human dignity. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event is supported by the Progressive Economy Forum (@PEF_online). PEF brings together a Council of eminent economists and academics to develop and advocate progressive economic policy ideas, and to improve public understanding of key economic issues. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequality Update: due to unforeseen circumstances Professor John Weeks is no longer speaking at this event.
Marx at 201: the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypi | Are we all Marxists now? Which of Marx’s ideas remain relevant, which redundant? Join leading scholars to address Marx’s legacy at 201. Are we all Marxists now? The question may sound strange but the virtues of the German philosopher are now extolled in the most unlikely of places. If this may be partly explained by the recent flurry of biographies and anniversaries – 2017 saw anniversaries of Das Kapital and the Russian Revolution, 2018 the bicentenary of his birth - the extraordinary growth of interest in Marx since the financial crisis seems undeniable. Socialism is even a talking point in the United States of America. and yet, the world looks as far removed from any communist utopia as could be imagined. Capitalism has accelerated; neoliberalism remains dominant, social democracy largely in retreat. If the political and ideological ascendency of capital has been fractured in the recent period, this seems predominantly to have benefitted the Right, leading to fears that a very different spectre from the one envisaged by Marx may now be haunting Europe, and the globe. Now therefore seems an opportune moment to reflect on the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society. Why is his influence so pervasive and resilient? Which ideas remain relevant, which redundant? The purpose of this event is to explore these questions with leading scholars from across different disciplines: economics, political theory, sociology and law. Bob Jessop is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster. Costas Lapavitsas (@C_Lapavitsas) is Professor of Economics at SOAS. Peter Ramsay (@PeterRamsay2011) is Professor of Law at LSE. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory at LSE. Mike Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at LSE. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.
Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
Occult Features of Anarchism: with attention to the conspiracy of kings and the conspiracy of the peoples [Audio]
Speaker(s): Dr Erica Lagalisse | Erica Lagalisse explores the relationship of 19th century anarchism with the clandestine fraternity, challenges leftist attachments to atheism, and intervenes in current debates concerning “conspiracy theory”. In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and will illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity. Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Erica Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, challenging anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world. Studying anarchism as a historical object, Lagalisse will show how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general, how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state. Erica Lagalisse, author of Occult Features of Anarchism, is an anthropologist and Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Mathijs Pelkmans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
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Comments (15)

Ankur Motwani

why are the podcasts not working ? everyother podcast is playable but this is not working

Mar 16th
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Mir Usman Ali

Ankur Motwani having the same problem. tried other podcast players also... didn't help!

Apr 12th
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Ankur Motwani

Ankur Motwani Anyone who's podcast is not working for lse, go to lse website and you can listen it there. Download also.

Apr 10th
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George Av

the host was pretty awful. hurried up, kept cutting off the guests.

Mar 6th
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Kaka

Grameen banks have seen its inception in many countries especially in India where Grameen banking is now present in many cities. Still we see distress in agro sector and framers suicide is on the rise. what are the reason and possible solutions.

Feb 22nd
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bone day

44'55"Q&A

Nov 11th
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bone day

42'10"inclusive organizations are attainable,focus on experience and needs

Nov 11th
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bone day

34'00"general approach to design thinking

Nov 11th
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bone day

25'30"design thinking

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

10'30" any difference between diversity and inclusion?

Nov 11th
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Adrian O'Looney

tzdg3

Sep 20th
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Kronen Bing

very informative and promotes much needed debate

Dec 30th
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Jūratė J

i think that teaching your kid to socialize is very important. and you're not gonna become global citizen without knowing how to communicate. you may write books of bullshit, but your real actions show your values:)

Sep 29th
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