DiscoverLSE: Public lectures and events
LSE: Public lectures and events
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LSE: Public lectures and events

Author: London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.
777 Episodes
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Netflix for Agriculture? Digital Technology for Development [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Kremer | The rapid spread of mobile phones in developing countries, coupled with recent advances in our ability to analyze big data through tools such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, has generated considerable excitement about the potential of ICT for development. How does the reality of ICT use for development stack up to this excitement? And, which institutional arrangements best promote the use of ICT for development? Michael Kremer begins to answer these questions by examining the case of mobile-phone enabled agricultural extension for smallholder farmers. Recent changes in technology have made it possible to disseminate personalized agricultural information to smallholder farmers via their mobile-phones. In this lecture, Kremer explores the rapidly accumulating evidence on the impact of mobile-phone based agricultural extension. There appear to be at least some settings where farmers change their behavior and increase their yields in response to advice delivered via their mobile phones. Preliminary evidence suggests this may be highly-cost effective. However, due to market failures and asymmetric information private markets will typically undersupply this public good. Governments tend to fail as well due to design flaws that make their solutions difficult for farmers to understand. Kremer discusses potential hybrid solutions that incorporate elements of both private and public provision and argues that zero (or negative) pricing for such services is likely optimal. Finally, the lecture ends with a speculative vision of a “Netflix for Agriculture” in which farmers would provide information, knowing that this would allow the system to make better recommendations for them, and this would in turn improve the performance of the system in offering recommendations to other farmers. This event is a Kapuscinski Lecture (@kapulectures). Kapuscinski Development Lectures is a series organised by the European Commission, UNDP and partner universities. The series is funded by the European Commission. Michael Kremer is Gates Professor of Developing Societies, Harvard University. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and a Presidential Faculty Fellowship, and was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Kremer’s recent research examines education, health, water, and agriculture in developing countries. He has been named as one of Scientific American’s 50 researchers of the year, and has won awards for his work on health economics, agricultural economics, and on Latin America. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of Economics and Director of STICERD, LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) is one of the leading economics departments in the world. It is a large department that ensures mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.
Refugia: solving the problem of mass displacement [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Robin Cohen | Using fresh interpretations of utopian and archipelagic thinking, Robin Cohen will examine the limits and possibilities of creating an imaginative answer to mass displacement. The mass displacement of people through war, ethnic conflict, climate change and lack of opportunity is one of the pressing global issues of our time. The three traditional responses to this issue – local integration, resettlement and return – have proved to be inadequate, while politicians find it difficult to confront xenophobic and nationalist reactions to large-scale and culturally-diverse migration. Radical proposals to address the problem of mass displacement are now being given serious attention by academics and policy-makers alike. Drawing on joint work with Nicholas Van Hear, in this lecture Robin Cohen will subject these proposals to brief scrutiny, but also offer a major alternative vision, a new kind of transnational polity they have called ‘Refugia’. Robin Cohen is Professor Emeritus of Development Studies and Senior Research Fellow at Kellogg College, University of Oxford. Isabel Shutes is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Brexit: with a little help from our friends [Audio]
Speaker(s): George Brandis, Janice Charette, Foo Chi Hsia, Sir Jerry Mateparae | The panel considers the implications of Brexit on other countries, as well as how our friends overseas are fundamental to securing a smooth transition. George Brandis (@AusHCUK) is Australian High Commissioner to the UK. Janice Charette (@JaniceCharette) is Canadian High Commissioner to the UK Foo Chi Hsia has been Singapore’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom since September 2014, and is concurrently accredited to Iceland and Ireland. Jerry Mateparae (@NZinUK) is New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom. Prior to his appointment, he served as New Zealand’s 20th Governor General. Previously, he has worked at senior levels in the New Zealand public service and military. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and Professor in Practice, Department of Government, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
Welfare after Beveridge: state or civil society [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Sennett, Professor Sir Julian Le Grand | Beveridge argued for the primacy of the state in providing welfare. His critics then and since have argued for more support from civil society, from communal associations, churches, voluntary organisations. This final lecture shows why obligations to others should be involuntary - and so why state support is fundamental. The challenge is to cut free of the bureaucratic tangles and institutional corruption which afflict the welfare state today. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) is a sociologist and Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. His research interests include the relationship between urban design and urban society, urban family patterns, the urban welfare system, the history of cities and the changing nature of work. He has served as a consultant on urban policy to the Labour party and is a frequent commentator in the press. Julian Le Grand held the Richard Titmuss Chair of Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy and is now Professor in the Marshall Institute. From 2003 to 2005 he was seconded to No. 10 Downing Street as a Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books and has written more than one hundred articles and book chapters on economics, philosophy and public policy. He has chaired several government commissions and working groups, including most recently the Mutuals Task Force for the Cabinet Office, and the Panels reviewing Doncaster's and Birmingham's Children's Services for the Department for Education. He has acted as an adviser to the President of the European Commission, the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, and the OECD. In 2015 he was awarded a knighthood for services to social sciences and public service. Michael McQuarrie is Associate Professor in Sociology at LSE. This is 1 in a series of 4 public lectures that Richard Sennett will deliver on Welfare After Beveridge. The others take place on 16 January, 23 January and 30 January.
Work Smarter Not Harder: hacks to take you a long way at work [Audio]
Speaker(s): Saj Jetha | Understand how to ‘hack’ work and be the best you can with Saj Jetha, founder of the multi-award winning The Smarty Train and author of The Smarts: Big Little Hacks to Take You a Long Way at Work. Enjoy a jargon-free insight into 'hacks' which can boost your performance and that of those around. Discover how the award-winning techniques covered in The Smarts can make a real impact in your work life, whether you’re an intern, are moving to the next challenge in your career, or are the CEO. Saj will not only explain the power of these ‘hacks’, but will also immerse you in a series of tantalising experiments showing how small changes can make a big difference to your workplace performance. Saj Jetha (@thesmartytrain) is an economist and founder of The Smarty Train, a training and talent advisory described as ‘The Secret Cinema of Training’. He has worked with tens of thousands of people at major corporations worldwide like Accenture, BP, EY, HSBC and Deliveroo. Saj is also a trustee of The University of London Convocation and was recently awarded Freedom of the City. He is an alumnus of UCL and LSE. Alexander (Sandy) Pepper is Professor of Management Practice, Department of Management, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies.
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Comments (8)

bone day

44'55"Q&A

Nov 11th
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bone day

42'10"inclusive organizations are attainable,focus on experience and needs

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

34'00"general approach to design thinking

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

25'30"design thinking

Nov 11th
Reply

bone day

10'30" any difference between diversity and inclusion?

Nov 11th
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Adrian O'Looney

tzdg3

Sep 20th
Reply

Kronen Bing

very informative and promotes much needed debate

Dec 30th
Reply

Jūratė J

i think that teaching your kid to socialize is very important. and you're not gonna become global citizen without knowing how to communicate. you may write books of bullshit, but your real actions show your values:)

Sep 29th
Reply
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