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Lochhead on Marketing

Author: Christopher Lochhead

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Every week Lochhead on Marketing ™ examines the mindset & strategies required to win.



This podcast is for executives and entrepreneurs who value counterintuitive marketing approaches coupled with category design and category creation strategies.



Host Christopher Lochhead is a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, host of “100 Outstanding” podcast “Follow Your Different”, Amazon #1 bestselling author of “Niche Down” and “Play Bigger”. The Marketing Journal calls him “one of the best minds in marketing”, Fast Company call him “A Human Exclamation Point”, NBA Legend Bill Walton calls him a “quasar” and The Economist calls him “off-putting to some”.
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In this episode, Christopher tackles an article that appeared in Harvard Business Review which he co-wrote with Nicolas Cole and special guest for today, Eddie Yoon. Eddie is the author of Super Consumers and is considered a Category Design Guru of Fortune 500.Today, we will discuss the thinking behind the article, specifically about the power of data flywheel and how high-growth companies used this to stay on top.Frustration with MisinformationEddie discusses the reason behind writing this article with Christopher and Nicolas. Basically, it was sharing the same frustration about companies commensurate misinformation or misunderstanding on becoming the first-mover versus category creators.“I just think, not only are they being misled, companies are in the relentless pursuit of being first. Let’s think about how to actually build a sustainable advantage at a category queen.” - Eddie YoonFurthermore, Eddie shares how he has observed this everywhere and that he is hopeful that people would take that energy that’s been misdirected to “being first”, towards building a flywheel.Missionary vs. MercenaryEddie shares they did tons of analysis which basically asks “what’s your motivation for creating a category, are you a missionary or a mercenary?” He says that mercenaries see the economics and they try to shortcut what is the fastest way to get to 76% to get the valuation. On the other hand, Missionaries are those who care about the product and the category being screwed up and would work towards improvement.Eddie further discusses where radical differentiation would come in along with the transformational outcomes. He also says radical generosity is behind this.Data FlywheelEddie shares the study they conducted for the article. Basically, he looked at 10 years worth of Fortune 100`fastest growing company list. He determined if he can identify fast-growing companies between those that were truly category creators, as defined by great product, service, company and data flywheel.“If you are growing in a very specific way, if you have this flywheel, your valuation is meaningfully higher. You have 5x market cap for every dollar in revenue.” - Eddie YoonTo hear more about The Difference Between a First Mover and a Category Creator and more relevant information from Eddie Yoon, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Eddie Yoon is the founder of EddieWouldGrow, LLC, a think tank and advisory firm on growth strategy. Previously he was one of the senior partners at The Cambridge Group, a strategy consulting firm. His work over the past two decades has driven over $8 billion dollars of annual incremental revenue. In particular, 8 of his clients have doubled or tripled in revenue in less than 8 years.  Eddie is one of the world’s leading experts on finding and monetizing superconsumers to grow and create new categories.He is the author of the book, Superconsumers: A Simple, Speedy and Sustainable Path to Superior Growth (Harvard Business School Press, 2016). His book was named as one of the Best Business Books of 2017 by Strategy & Business. He is also the author of over 100 articles, including “Make Your Best Customers Even Better” (Harvard Business Review magazine, March 2014) and “Why It Pays to Be a Category Creator” (Harvard Business Review magazine, March 2013). Additionally, he has appeared on CNBC and MSNBC and been quoted in The Wall Street Journal, The Economist and Forbes and has been a keynote speaker in the U.S., Canada, Kenya, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, the UK and Japan. Eddie holds an AB in Political Science and Economics from the University of Chicago. Having been born and raised in Hawaii, he went to the Punahou School in Honolulu. Eddie lives in Chicago with his wife and three children.Links:Harvard Business Review: The Difference Between a First Mover and a Category CreatorEddie YoonNicolas CageWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™!
Today is another special episode of Lochhead on Marketing as Paul Maher, Founder of Positive Marketing (UK) joins us to talk about Trendjacking Marketing and Public Relations. His firm, Positive, won the SABRE Award for Best-earned Media Agency in Europe, Middle East, and Africa.TrendjackingPaul Maher discusses the secret black art of marketing, PR, communications, and media called the trendjacking. This PR strategy is widely used nowadays as marketers aim to position themselves to become consistently relevant to their market.“Trendjacking is all about how do we take what’s happening in the news and attach ourselves to that, use that as an advantage to become an expert, to become known, to position ourselves effectively.” - Paul MaherChristopher and Paul have worked in several projects in the past and have actually the promulgators of trendjacking when they diverted a mergers and acquisition news of a competitor in the past.Seven Secrets of Trendjacking1. BE POSITIVE The news happens anyway, why not be in it? Category leaders make rather than observe the news.2. BE PROVOCATIVETo do this you need to recognize the very definition of news is what you DIDN’T know, or as William Randolph Hearst, the biggest news baron of the pre-Facebook world famously said, ‘WHAT SOMEONE ELSE DOES NOT WANT YOU TO KNOW’. Get creative and find out who does not want to know what you want to say.3. PREDICT (IT’S CALLED A NEWS CYCLE FOR A REASON)As well as great content, you need great timing. To know when is the optimal time to drop your bomb, you need to read patterns and become a news junkie, not an expert on everything from Celebrity Diets to Robot Brain Surgery, but at least stay across what’s going on in your sector. Preferably twice or more a day. Alternatively hire help, in the form of an agency or consultant who will.4. PREPARE, PREPARE, PREPARESet the trap and give yourself options. So perhaps have a set of pitches for each eventuality. England’s new Prime Minister Boris Johnston, also until recently one of the UK’s highest-paid newspaper columnists wrote two versions of an opinion piece, one for and one against Brexit. This way he hedged his bets and prevented a last-minute rewrite, we do this often for clients who want to trendjack major Government data announcements, such as Non-Farm jobs, GDP, etc. This brings us to.5. BE PROMPT - ONLY EARLY BIRDS CATCH WORMSAs a former journalist, dealing with hundreds of inbound calls each day, I would react to the ‘News no one else wants you to hear’ positively the first time. I also understand the second time a fresh angle is pitched, it is just plain old. Many of those who work on flagship news programs start their day earlier than the rest of the world. As the news rolls 24x7 it makes sense to make that early morning call or speak to Planning Departments the night before you drop.6. BE PRAGMATIC - ORIGINAL BUT READY TO FLEX YOUR ANGLESAmbitious and original trendjackers are luckier trendjackers. Flip your angle, be more counter-intuitive, find the perfect image to accompany your trendjack. Smartest of all, chalk up your failures, wait for the news cycle to roll around and point to a ‘Told you so’ prediction when it does.We regularly issue ‘Open Letters’ to regulators, government bodies or even the entire tech industry when we scratch on a trendjack, just SO WE CAN GO BACK. Predictions are hard, especially in the future. So better to make them early and forget those which don’t come off.7. BE PERSISTENTRecognize these perennial stories? They are not going away. Users disappointed by tech outage Record good/bad holiday retail sales Sales of hot new thing break records CEO under pressure from board members Employment figure up/down last quarterNotice how predictable these stories are? Not succeeding the first time is to be expected, but more is more.Remember there are a lot of newspaper pages to it and an infini...
Christopher Lochhead discusses differentiation or differentiators of a brand, product or company. He further shares what legendary marketers do, makes their marketing better or makes it different?DifferentiatorsWe often hear this word a lot in marketing: differentiation. Christopher poses the question when speaking about a product or brand differentiation, is it really different or is it better?In reality, when most CEOs, CMOs, entrepreneurs and product investors say differentiators, what really comes out of their mouth is better. Christopher however, believes making a difference is the better choice.True DifferentiationChristopher suggests a brainstorming session with people in order to determine true differentiation. Create a list of “what makes you different.” Step back and look at your extensive list and tick what makes you different.“If you have a list of 50 differentiators out there, if five of them are truly different, you'll be doing well, I think.” - Christopher LochheadWhy does this matter? It matters because different forces a choice, and better is a comparison game. Legendary marketers want to own a position where they can’t be easily knocked off. They prefer the perception of being unique, distinct, hard to replace and as someone who solves a problem and creates value.The “Better” GameChristopher cites Pepsi as the top contender in this “better” game. They run a series of campaigns comparing themselves to Coke. However, this still proves to be ineffective.“The problem with this better game is, whatever you’re comparing yourself better with, ultimately, is the thing you’re giving power to.” - Christopher LochheadOne of the legendary things that category designers and creators tend to do is to never talk about competitors. Exactly, for this reason, the different conversation, forces a choice. Fundamentally, marketing is about distinguishing oneself.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.
021 Is Your Brand Blue?

021 Is Your Brand Blue?

2019-10-1500:11:05

In today’s episode, Christopher Lochhead dives down deep into the power of colors and how it affects your brand marketing. In a world where almost all brands are Blue (and some are red), how do you make your brand different and stand out?What’s With Color Blue?Christopher recently represented a tech company with a stand-out logo, it's color pink and orange. According to this company, 70% of B2B company logos are blue.Christopher researched this claim and indeed found out, 33% of the world’s top brands companies are blue. Some 29% are red, 28% are black or grey and 13% are yellow or gold.“A big part of doing legendary marketing is standing out, being different, being unique. Then for the most part, if you’re gonna be blue, you’re not going to stand out and frankly if you’re gonna be red, you’re probably not gonna stand out, too.” - Christopher Lochhead Colors and Lack Thereof One of the guests of Follow Your Different David Rendall, Ph.D., author of Freak Factor, is one unique example. He embraced the color pink. In fact, he wears pink shirts, pink suits and even his eyeglass frames are pink.As a public speaker, he wears pink not only to stand out but to send a message to the world that its okay to express oneself and let go of what others might think of you. Another example is Max Temkin, the creator of Cards Against Humanity. He shared that he has no eye for color so he just went with black and white, with a distinct font.“If you think about brands how many brands do you know that actually are strategic in their use of color?” - Christopher LochheadAn Underexploited OpportunityLegendary companies and legendary brands stand out because they are different. Color is an underexploited opportunity to stand out. Christopher encourages marketers and designers to think strategically about color.“If you are involved with the re-brand or brand launch, I would encourage you to take a look at all of the brands in your near-space categories and hold it against the wall and look at what they look like [against your brand]” - Christopher Lochhead.Christopher further asks, “how can you use color as part of your brand, as part of your logo to stand out? Ultimately, he asks what color or colors can you own? This is a great opportunity to gain a strategic advantage over the competition.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Links: Follow Your Different - Max TemkinFollow Your Different - David RendallVowels AdvertisingWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.
From time to time, we will bring on guests to go deep on a topic in a particular field. Today’s guest is Tom Schwab, founder of Interview Valet. As we celebrate International Podcast Day, we will discuss the power of podcast guesting and why it is a strategic component of legendary marketing today.Connecting with PeopleTom stresses the importance of podcast guesting, especially for business executives, authors, and entrepreneurs. He believes exposure brings opportunity and podcast guesting is one of the most intimate and targeted ways for customers to know somebody.“I love podcasts because its a way to really connect with people. You’re not yelling, you’re talking with them. They're choosing to listen to you.” - Tom SchwabMainstream Media vs. PodcastingTom discusses how powerful podcasting. He says it should be a major part of one’s content strategy. In mainstream media, aside from the cost to advertise (television, print, and radio), one acquires a limited time and limited space, unlike in podcast guesting, where it reaches hundreds of thousands, overtime.“You're tapping into an audience, getting that like and trust, getting introduced by someone,  they already know. The other thing too is, if you do a live speech, it’s really hard to repurpose that content. If you do a podcast interview, you can do the transcript to make blogs.” - Tom SchwabChristopher agrees with Tom, as he speaks based on experience. He mentions how he appears on different mainstream media and only get to share a portion of his thoughts for a few seconds.“Podcast interview is an easy and scalable way to really go deeper. People will understand you and what really drove you, why you got into the business. People should know they could like and trust you. That’s really hard to do in a 30 sec clip or a little Facebook ad.”  - Tom SchwabThe Golden Age of PodcastingTom cites Harvard University and the conference that they organized last year on podcasting. They call this time as the Golden Age of Podcasting and there is never the best time to explore podcast advertising other than at the present time.Christopher also shares that there is a lot of whitespace opportunity in podcasting. He believes that there is a high value for sponsors because podcasts provide a high level of intimacy in terms of getting to know the guests through a conversation.“I think today, brands want to know the heart behind it. Those people that can get out there early and explain that, not in an ad but in an actual conversation. To me, that's where you can really build up a lifetime value of a customer.” - Tom SchwabTo hear more about the power of podcast guesting and more relevant information from Tom Schwab, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Tom Schwab knows how to build an online business.He’s done it successfully several times and now helps others find online success with podcast interview marketing.Marketing at its heart is starting a conversation with someone who could be an ideal customer.Tom helps thought leaders (coaches, authors, speakers, consultants, emerging brands) get featured on leading podcasts their ideal prospects are already listening to. The Interview Valet system then helps them to turn listeners into customers.The author of Podcast Guest Profits: Grow Your Business with a Targeted Interview Strategy, Tom is also Founder/CEO of Interview Valet, the category king of Podcast Interview Marketing.Links:Linkedin - Thomas SchwabInterview ValetWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! You may also subscribe to his newsletter, The Difference, for some amazing content.
Christopher Lochhead shares an excerpt today from his first book, Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets about the importance and the power of a point of view. He shares to us why legendary marketers opt to sell a POV, rather than sell a product or service.Market the POV, not the product!Legendary creators and designers, market the point of view or POV, not their product and services. When companies show consumers the idea or the problem that they envision to solve, consumers will most likely become interested in the products and services around that idea.“Its counter-intuitive for most marketers, innovators and CEOs. We think what we're doing in marketing, is marketing a product with features and maybe, benefits. When in reality, category creators and designers market the POV, because once people subscribe to your way of looking at things, they are going to be interested in what you have to market.” - Christopher LochheadPOVs are timelessPOV is the company’s true North. It doesn’t change over time, unlike messaging. Companies such as Salesforce or American Airlines have consistently focused on their POV. These are companies who have anchored their business to a point of view, about what they stand for in the world.Messaging is Tailored POV for an AudienceChristopher cites examples on how messages are tailored POVs for an audience, idea or a trend. He shares how they train an entire company on how to deliver their POV. Employees watch a 10-min presentation on thePOV of the company. The ultimate goal is for the employees to be able to deliver the POV.Play Bigger Chapter 5Here is an excerpt from Chapter 5 of the book Play Bigger:"Stories have always been an industrial-strength force in human progress, from the epic poems of Homer to the tales of Marco Polo, Shakespeare’s historical plays, the novels of Ayn Rand, and biographies of Steve Jobs.Stories alter perspectives and exert influence.When traders on Wall Street consider a stock, they often ask, “What’s the story?”When pitching a venture capitalist, entrepreneurs get funding when they craft a great story, and now a cottage industry offers pitch training.Raw information reaches us on an intellectual level, but stories reach into our hearts and our pants.Decades of brain research have demonstrated that stories have a more lasting impact than facts.One 1969 Stanford study, “Narrative Stories as Mediators for Serial Learning," showed that students remembered six to seven times more words embedded in a story compared to random words. [i]In the 2010s, Paul Zak, a professor at Claremont Graduate University found that character-driven, attention-grabbing stories actually increase oxytocin in the brain.Oxytocin is an empathy chemical, and it motivates cooperation and understanding—quite important when trying to convince someone to, as Apple used to say, think different.“My experiments show that character-driven stories with emotional content result in a better understanding of the key points a speaker wishes to make and enable better recall of these points weeks later,” Zack wrote.He added a swipe at the way too much business has been conducted for far too long:“In terms of making an impact, [storytelling] blows the standard PowerPoint presentation to bits.”[ii]That’s why category designers tell a story. We call that story a point of view, or POV.After you come up with an aha of an initial market or technology insight, and after you discover and define the right category, you have to craft the story about the category that you’ll tell. You need a powerful POV.A POV tells the world you’re a company on a mission, not a missionary company looking to make money any way it can.It frames the new problem that your category identifies and sets you up as the answer. When someone can articulate your problem, you believe that person must have the solution.It’s why Bill Clinton won two presidential elections by c...
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about a giant topic in business today, personal branding. He further shares the difference between a brand and a person. Moreover, he discusses why legendary executives and marketers don't give weigh to personal branding much.Personal Beef with Personal BrandingPersonal branding has become a giant issue in business today. It seems like people cannot fire up their social media, such as Linkedin and even Amazon, without personal branding. The idea started around the late 80s or early 90s and has become effed up overtime.Christopher lays out his argument on the difference between a brand and a person. People have a mental connection with a brand while with a person, people develop relationships.“I have a very different relationship with my friend Sue Barsamian. She’s the most effective exec I know. Guess how much time she spent thinking about and working on her personal brand? Zero!” - Christopher LochheadDeveloping A ReputationSue Barsamian was the guest on Follow Your Different Episode 083. She has a solid 36-years in Silicon Valley, working with Startups and multinationals such as HP. Christopher shares that she has zero efforts in maintaining a personal brand, instead, she aims to develop a reputation.Silicon Valley respects Sue for producing legendary results and creating massive value. Moreover, she dominated her own niche: “Legendary Enterprise Tech Executive, who scales.” In developing a reputation, Christopher poses the following questions:“What’s your personal Niche Down? Where are you going to focus your talent? What results are you going to produce? Who are the kinds of people you want to surround yourself with?” - Christopher LochheadRethink this Personal Branding BullshitChristopher encourages everyone to re-think this idea of personal branding because he believes that what people prefer is a reputation.“Reputations come from producing legendary results. Personal branding, by definition, is contrived and inauthentic.” - Christopher LochheadPeople would best be deemed as a person of character, who produces results and is doing legendary work. In conclusion, Christopher advises everyone to spend zero time on personal branding and focus, instead, on the following:1) Your personal Niche Down - what niche do you want to be known for owning2) Producing legendary results - people who produce legendary results are highly sought after in business. They are unique by definition and they hang out with people who also do legendary things.3) and making a difference.“Because in my experience, people who do that, get the most valuable thing in business: a reputation.” -Christopher LochheadTo hear more about why personal branding is bullshit and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Links:Follow Your Different Episode 083: Sue BarsamianWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes! Get amazing, different stories on business, marketing, and life.
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about why the company that frames and markets the problem, the most effectively, wins. To illustrate, he cites a music company, m, and ho they recently pulled something off in the marketing and PR point of view.Frame the Problem, Not the SolutionWise marketers and category creators have a strategic way of creating legendary marketing. One of these is framing the problem. This strategy is a sure-fire way to win a category.“When the world agrees with you about the problem that you solved, and thinks about the problem, exactly the way you want them to, then they sort of have an ‘a-ha!’” - Christopher Lochhead.Case In Point: Kobalt One illustration of this point is a recent article about Kobalt. Kobalt is a music technology company, which recently raised $200 million in VC funding.TechCrunch featured Kobalt in a two-part series. Christopher highlights a part of the article stating “changing the way the music industry does business and putting more money into musicians’ pockets in the process.”What blew Christopher’s mind off is the title of the article: “How Kobalt is simplifying the killer complexities of the music industry.”Why is this headline, mind-blowing?Christopher believes that Kobalt’s PR team presented their company in a very effective way since TechCrunch featured them. The reporter Eric Peckam, needs to believe that there are “killer complexities” in the music business and that these need to be “simplified.”“They [Kobalt] are evangelizing their problem and in this case, their getting the media to write a headline at the top of the homepage, with the exact framing of the problem that they want.” - Christopher LochheadAs Christopher describes it, this is a legendary category design PR. Once people think that you get their problem, they connect the dots and infer that you have the solution.“If you want to be moving your company forward, evangelize the problem. Spend a lot more time marketing, talking about the problem than the solution.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about how to Frame the Problem and Win and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Links:TechCrunch: How Kobalt is simplifying the killer complexities of the music industryWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In today’s episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about why courage is a critical ingredient for legendary marketing and category design. He poses the question: “What does it take to make legendary marketing happen?” and he shares some except his book Niche Down to answer this.Break From The PackWhat does it take to break from the pack? The pack, which usually means the general public, the people who think and does the same kind of marketing. What do we need to enable us to design a category and from then, execute to dominate that category?On Christopher’s second book, Niche Down, co-writer Heather Clancy wrote some very important pointers in creating a category“I hope you find it informative and inspiring as it relates to summoning the courage to actually do something legendary, design and dominate a category.” - Christopher LochheadExcerpts from Niche DownHeather Clancy wrote in the book:Category design actually requires going against that pack mentality. Humans have a primordial need to feel safe in numbers. We get a lot of positive feedback from being the same as others. Our challenge to you is to break from the pack. Free the creative part, the innovative part,the legendary part of you — and let that part be different.Our dream is that you harness the exponential power of what makes you different versus the incrementalism of just being better. Because it is being different that makes a difference. And we know how tough that can be.“Kermit The Frog” famously sang: “It’s not easy being green.”Bill Walton, the NBA legend commiserates: “In life, things go wrong. In life, things collapse….People try to drag you down and people try to say ‘No’ to you.”He goes on to posit, “I want to live in a world of ‘Yes’.” Of course, there will be a lot of “losery” along the way.  To be legendary is to be ready for setbacks, disappointments and failures.Because shit happens. Sometimes, life can be crushing. We’ve both been crushed more times than we can count. It’s okay to be a loser.We all are. Failure is our teacher. Failure is our friend. Failure is our coach. Failure gives us humility. Failure gives us grit. Failure gives us a foundation. Losing is an essential ingredient for being legendary. Every time we lose we have a choice.Give up.Or, take the loss head on, learn from it and execute like a badass legend.It Takes Courage to be LegendaryWhat Heather and Christopher are trying to communicate is the "emotional or psychological” barrier in doing legendary marketing. To put it simply, it takes a lot of courage to be legendary. Courage is moving forward in pursuing your plans, even though a lot of evidence states it won’t work.Christopher cited his other podcast, Follow Your Different as an example. Regardless of what the experts in the podcasting industry were telling him — that business people will not listen to a long-form, unedited conversation podcast — FYD has become a top 200 overall charting podcast in the United States.“If you believe in the problem you're solving and you believe in your vision, then go with it. Be different, stick to it and have the courage to be legendary and execute like a badass legend.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about Category Creation Courage and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.
In most industries, product-market fit is an unquestioned gospel, even in Silicon Valley. On the contrary, Christopher believes that product-market fit is a dangerous idea. Why? Because legendary marketers create and design their own category, as opposed to competing in an existing category.Product-Market FitIn the tech startup world, achieving product-market fit is often considered a major milestone. However, Christopher argues that product-market fit is one of the most dangerous ideas in business today.“The problem with product-market fit is that language can trick marketers into thinking that what you’re doing is building a product and you’re trying to fit it in a market.” - Christopher LochheadLegendary creators are not looking to “fit” into a market, instead, they want to stand out. Standing out means to design their own market category.Category King and QueensChristopher cites some of the category kings and queens of today. Think about Jeff Bezos, he is equated with the term eCommerce, just as we equate Pablo Picasso with Cubism. We also have Sara Blakely of Spanx, who created her own category of Shapeware, not just trying to fit into the girdle category."Think about the most respected entrepreneurs, creators, and innovators. a huge part of why we all respect them is because they broke or took new ground." - Christopher LochheadSome other great examples are AirBNB, which presented a new idea and experience for tourists and travelers. Another one is Evian, who deviated from the idea that water is free. Red Bull also dominated their energy drink category, as opposed to hydration drinks, where Gatorade was category king. “The greatest innovators teach the world to think differently. With a fresh idea, a new take on an old problem or by solving a problem we didn’t even know we had.” - Christopher LochheadWhere the Challenge LiesThe challenge of product-market fit is, it can trap inventors and creators into thinking that they can test their product and service to people and f they consume it, they equate it to the future success of the product. If these people do not consume the product intuitively, then they can just go back and work on the product.This is in opposition to Henry Ford’s mindset who said: “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” Moreover, even Steve Jobs has the same ideas on product-market fit, saying “customers don’t know what they want until we’ve shown them.”“The big ah-ha here is that there is a massive distinction between fitting into an existing market category and competing versus creating your own new market category.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about why Product-Market Fit Is A Dangerous Idea and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Links:Quora: How do you define Product-Market Fit? Lochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about how marketers strategically use language. Legendary marketers create a new language that educates the world on how they want their product or service perceived. Customer’s adaptation to that language is also a great tool to measure success.How People Perceive Us Christopher recently had Lee Hartley Carter on Follow Your Different Episode 099. Lee and her firm specialize in language strategy. We can infer that marketers pay very close attention to the use of words.Christopher reminds us that the usage of some phrases undermines a person’s credibility. Some examples include phrases such as “don’t take my word for it” or “let me be honest with you.”“Legendary Marketers and Category Designers know that a demarcation point in language creates a demarcation point in thinking, which creates a demarcation in action, usage, and consumption.” - Christopher LochheadCreate New, Powerful LanguageChristopher discusses how legendary marketers use language to create new thinking that educates the world. This language teaches customers what they do, why it matters and how to value it.Some important examples are Starbucks and their “Double Grande Latte” instead of medium coffee. Another one is selling “pre-owned vehicles” versus “used cars.” Moreover, cloud-based software benefitted greatly with the usage of “on-premise software"Indication of SuccessIt’s far too common to hear at almost every other coffee shop other than Starbucks — customers are asking for Grande or Frappe. Customers adapting to a new language is a great indication of success.“You know you’re winning when customers start using your language, parrot them back to you, and they use it in the competitor’s stores.” - Christopher LochheadChristopher stresses Lee’s point, marketers need a language strategy! Category creators and designers create a new language to create a demarcation point in thinking, action, usage, and consumption.To hear more about don’t take my word for it and more relevant information about language strategy from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Lochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In today’s episode, Christopher gives us a rundown on why he thinks committees kill legendary marketing.Why is so much marketing, shitty?Christopher Lochhead candidly shares his honest observation on the industry today: a lot of marketing efforts suck. Aside from bad creatives, much of this onslaught of marketing stems from their inability to make a difference in designing and dominating a market category. Who’s to blame? Christopher says its the committees.“This is probably true for most major initiatives in business, but it’s especially true in marketing because, fundamentally, legendary marketing is about leadership.” - Christopher LochheadTo become the leader in your space — the category queen — a company must define and dominate a market niche. This not only holds true in tech companies but for almost all industries today. To dominate a market, every company’s objective should focus on building the company that wins, with a clear point of view on problem-solving.The problem with committees A famous automotive engineer and businessman, Charles Kettering, once said: “If you want to kill any idea in the world, get a committee working on it.” Why does committees hinder legendary marketing?“The problem with most committees is that they are focused on process, not results.” - Christopher LochheadCommittees generally try to incorporate everyone’s “feedback,” spend time “socializing ideas” and analyzing data. In the end, they are trying too hard to make everyone happy. Committees strive to be collaborative and ensure that all constituents have a say.More issues with committeesA structural problem with many committees is that a lot of people can say no, while at the same time, they are not clear about who can say yes. By definition, if everybody agrees, that's not a legendary idea.“As a result, committees produce a compromise. They settle on the ideas that everyone could agree on. Not legendary ideas.” - Christopher LochheadAdditionally, people involved in committees are oftentimes not subject matter experts themselves, which further leads to mediocre marketing efforts.“It's not about what people like, it's about what's gonna work. Particularly what's gonna work through the lens. Will these help us design and dominate a giant category that matters and take 2/3 of the economics?” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about committees kill legendary marketing and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founder/CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Book: Play BiggerLochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead talks about the powerful, surprising winner-take-all realities of categories and why you want to be the category queen/king in your market. Christopher layout facts and data on category creation economics that you’ll find beneficial for your business, whether you’re in the tech industry or not.Winner Takes AllIn Christopher’s first book Play Bigger, they wrote about a research project they conducted on thousands of tech start-ups from 2000 to 2015, determining the market cap or valuation. Specifically, they wanted to know the percentage of the total value goes to the leader or category queen. In reality, one company gets 2/3 for the entire market category.“The study shows that category queens earned 76 percent of the market capitalization of their entire market categories.” - Christopher LochheadChristopher’s good friend, Bob Evans said: “every company is a software company.” Tech company dynamics are now applicable to non-tech companies.VCs “Me Too Strategy”Christopher quoted a portion from his book Play Bigger. VCs oftentimes fall for the Me Too strategy where every firm would invest in some company in an emerging category, thinking it will succeed just like the first one who did.“In Silicon Valley, we’ve watched venture capitalists (VCs) increasingly adopt a category king investment philosophy. Paul Martino of Bullpen Capital notes that VCs used to have a “me-too” strategy.  If a start-up hit it big and opened up a hot new category, the many VC firms in Silicon Valley assumed that there was room for a lot of winners in that category.” - Christopher Lochhead, Play BiggerFurthermore, Paul Martino tells us "it’s now apparent that one company wins big and dominates a healthy c0ategory, and the rest struggle, get acquired or perish. That means that as soon as one company appears to be the category king, the smart money competes to invest in that company, bidding up its value.”Category Creation is the Ultimate StrategyChristopher’s friend and category guru to Fortune 500 companies Eddie Yoon wrote for Harvard Business Review on the financial impacts of category creation.He reported that “top 20 firms in Fortune‘s 2010 list of fastest-growing companies received $3.40 in incremental market capitalization for every $1.00 of revenue growth. Half the top 20 companies grew via category creation. Wall Street exponentially rewards the category creation companies, giving them $5.60 in incremental market capitalization for $1.00 in revenue growth.”“No matter how you want to look at it, the bottom line is category kings take the vast majority of economics and are massively rewarded for becoming the category queen of the space.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about the category creation economics 101 and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher advised over 50 venture-backed startups. He is a Venture Capital Limited Partner and a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, entrepreneur. In addition, he co-authored two bestsellers: Niche Down and Play Bigger.After he flunked school, with few other options, Christopher started his first company at the age of 18.He was a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard, in 2006, acquired that company for $4.5 billion.Further, he also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD. Christopher was the founder/CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient. He also served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Christopher loves his family and friends. He thinks the Ramones are legendary and loves riding the mountains and waves of Northern California.Links:Book: Play BiggerCategory Creation Is the Ultimate Growth StrategyFortune‘s 2010 list of fastest-growing companiesLochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners.
In this episode. Christopher Lochhead talks about what your real product or real service is. He discusses why product development and marketing should team because the perception of your product is your product.Marketing DefinedOne CEO, who is also a good friend of Christopher, once stated that “Marketing is what you do when you have a shitty product.” He was telling Christopher about their competitor who had a significantly inferior product but is, at that time, out-marketing them. Additionally, quite a lot of people in Silicon Valley also think this way.Wikipedia defines marketing and product as such: “In marketing, a product is an object or system made available for consumer use; it is everything that can be offered to a market to satisfy the desire or need of a customer."“I actually don’t want to disagree with Wikipedia, but I do want to propose a different perspective. Your real product, your real service, is people’s perception of your product and service." - Christopher LochheadThe People’s Perception of Your ProductsChristopher asserts that your product and service is not your product, but what people say it is, think it is and feel about it. He thinks that what other people say about the product or the service, is the truth, regardless if we think of it as true or not.He cites examples such as Harley Davidson and Jack Daniels. These brands may not be the most efficient in performance or the most premium whiskey available, but they have made a mark in the minds and the hearts of consumers. In fact, they are considered category kings.However, Christopher also cited instances when people's perceptions of product change, such as that of Facebook and Boeing 737 MAX. They can fix their products but the perceptions will take forever to change.The “Perception Manufacturing Business”Christopher believes that we are in the “perception manufacturing business.” Further, he mentions that not only does the perception of the product more important than the product itself, but it is also actually what the developer is building when he builds and market the products."You don’t make products, you make perceptions about products. That is why legendary marketing is equally important to building legendary products.” - Christopher LochheadIn conclusion, Christopher says that product engineering, product development, and marketing need to come together. They must realize that they are in the “perception manufacturing business.”“It is ludicrous to say marketing is what you do when you have a shitty product. Marketing is what you do when you have a legendary product and you want people to perceive it as such.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about the Perception of Your Product is Your Product and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher advised over 50 venture-backed startups. He is a venture capital limited partner and a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, entrepreneur. In addition, he co-authored two bestsellers: Niche Down and Play Bigger.After he flunked school, with few other options, Christopher started his first company at the age of 18.He was a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard, in 2006, acquired that company for $4.5 billion.Further, he also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD. Christopher was the founder/CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient. He also served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Christopher loves his family and friends. He thinks the Ramones are legendary and loves riding the mountains and waves of Northern California.We hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead shares two eye-opening stories about Artificial Intelligence in Marketing. First is about Nike buying an AI marketing analytics company and second, Chase Bank using AI to write marketing copies. He further discusses how these two leverages technology to produce massive results.Nike Acquires AI StartupTech Crunch reported that Nike announced its acquisition of the Boston-area startup Celect. This is to help Nike beef up its predictive analytics strengths. The startup’s tech focuses on delivering data insights based on structured and unstructured retail data."What we do know is Nike spent a lot of money to get their hands on a company that specializes in crunching a shit ton of data, of many thousands of customers, to anticipate their needs going forward." - Christopher LochheadChristopher noted that this move of a giant brand has never happened in the past. In conclusion, this proves that analytics plays a huge role in Marketing. AI provides marketers data on customer’s wants and needs — even before they do."What kind of big data analytics and AI are we using to understand our market categories and what might we do in this area?"  - Christopher LochheadAI Machines Outperforming HumansAdAge published an experiment that they conducted about the bank company Chase. They compared the advertising copies written by humans versus that of AI technology. The result is: AI outperformed humans — with higher consumers clicking on the copy written by an AI machine.“The folks at Chase Bank entered a five-year agreement with this company Persado to use machine learning to write their ad copy.” - Christopher LochheadThe Implications of AI Marketing Legendary marketers should always be experimenting with both the art and the science of marketing.“We're gonna see more companies benchmarking the two — whether ad headlines and copy, logo design and a lot of other creative things. What many of us in marketing thought technology wouldn't touch — are now being touch by that.” - Christopher LochheadAs the lines of Science and Art blur, Christopher calls out to fellow Creative professionals to stay in tune with technology. Never be complacent about our jobs because AI is coming to replace everything. The best action to do at the moment is to leverage this technology and not to resist it.“Leverage the science and be super strategically creative at the same time.” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about Artificial Intelligence Marketing and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher advised over 50 venture-backed startups. He is a venture capital limited partner and a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO, entrepreneur. In addition, he co-authored two bestsellers: Niche Down and Play Bigger.After he flunked school, with few other options, Christopher started his first company at the age of 18.He was a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard, in 2006, acquired that company for $4.5 billion.Further, he also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD. Christopher was the founder/CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient. He also served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Christopher loves his family and friends. He thinks the Ramones are legendary and loves riding the mountains and waves of Northern California.Link:Nike buys an AI startup that predicts what consumers wantChase Commits To Ai After Machines Outperform Humans In Copywriting TrialsWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
The difference between Marketing Strategy and Tactics, oftentimes, confuses most people. In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, Christopher Lochhead talks about some of the pressing questions people have on strategy and tactics.Quoting Dushka Zappata A good friend of Lochhead, Senior Communication and PR Executive Dushka Zappata⁠ helps shine a light on this confusion marketers have about strategy and tactics. She has 20 years experience in the tech industry and she amassed 140 million views in Q&A site Quora with her writing⁠.StrategyDushka Zappata answered the distinction between strategy and tactics. According to her, strategy answers the question “why?” To give an example for this, one may ask, "why are we doing this, why do we think it's a good idea?”“For strategy, the answer should be a blend of data, understanding of trends and creativity.” - Dushka ZappataTacticsShe further continued that tactics, on the other hand, answers the question “how.” This pertains to questions such as, “how will we get this done," "what are the actions needed" and "what will get executed⁠."Working on your marketing strategy and tactics need not be confusing. To be clear, strategy answers, “why,” and tactics answers, “how.”To hear more about Marketing Strategy vs. Tactics and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Lochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
Christopher Lochhead discusses some of his marketing ideas timely for a potential (we hope not, but economists say otherwise) recession. Here are 7 recession marketing ideas for our listeners that you might want to consider for your business.1. Never Let A Good Recession Go To Waste!History proved that recessions are the impetus for change. With change comes both threats and opportunities. Ordinary business people usually panic and focus on threats. However, legendary marketers focus on both. Recessions are a great excuse for taking action, especially those that should have been taken anyway.“Get on your recession planning now! Do not wait for the recession to happen. Get on it, regardless of whether or not we’re going to have a recession. They are great excuse to tighten up shit on your ship!” - Christopher Lochhead2. Assume you can’t raise any more moneyRecession talks are best paired with the assumption that there is no money available for lending ⁠— no more VCs, bank loans, operating lines or rich uncles. If you do raise equity or debt, expect that your valuation or market cap is likely coming down, so you will have to give up more equity to raise VC. Likewise your costs to service loans or operating lines is going up.“Focus on your cash and remember that paying customers are your best VCs, your best bankers.” - Christopher Lochhead3, Measure twice, cut onceGo through your marketing plans and budget with a magnifying glass. Christopher advises to categorize every single investment ⁠— either one time or on-going investments ⁠— into three buckets: must do, good to do, nice to do.“Do not have more than a 3rd of your investments in ‘Must Do.’ Find at least 10% of your investments that you can cut now. If you want to get aggressive, find 25%. Plan to cut or re-deploy at least 5%, no matter what happens – recession or not.” - Christopher Lochhead 4. Brainstorm short-term ways to increase revenueCome up with some packages or offerings you can promote to your best customers now. Brainstorm around 25 ideas on how to increase revenue immediately. Ideas that aims to provide customers with an incentive to buy more from you right now are the key to this before they start cutting back spending hard.5. Market & Sell Into The WhitespaceGet a list of all of your existing customers and figure out which customers, own / use which of your products and services. This is to identify the white space or which customers are not users of all of your offerings.6. Consider a competitor trade-in.Recessions are a unique opportunity to destroy your completion. 7. Double Down on Your CategoryThis is an area you should focus on a recession. Chances are, most of your competition is going to panic and they most likely will over-cut marketing. Take advantage of the lower cost of marketing and go hard on content marketing, especially in social media.“Your prospects and customers will be hearing less noise. Take advantage of this, to evangelize your category point-of-view. Become more visible, while your competition is hiding under a desk, asking for their mommies.” - Christopher LochheadBio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive ⁠— which was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 2006 for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Lochhead.com
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SPECIAL OFFER!

2019-08-1200:06:01

This is Christopher and I sure hope you are enjoying some of the first episodes of Lochhead on Marketing. I want to tell you about a special offer we’re making and why.Radical GenerosityI am not a fan of self-promotion (which may sound crazy, coming from a three-time marketing guy), so I have thought about how I’m going to market and promote the podcast.On one hand, I wanted to do some marketing that would feel comfortable without the overly self-promotional crap. This brings us to my buddy and co-conspirator on category creation and design and legendary marketing, Eddie Yoon. He has this powerful idea: that legendary category designers practice “radical generosity.” If you think about the word ‘creation’, in a lot of ways, you could argue creation is about bringing something to the world and Eddie says if you wanted to create a design category -- having a radical generosity mindset matters.We’re Gonna Spend A Bunch Of MoneyLegendary category designers and creators come from a place of generosity. So, to promote this podcast, I am going to spend a bunch of money.  Rather than buying a ton of ads, I thought I might include you. I’m doing it in a way that is radically generous.Here's the offer: I’d love it if you will rate and review Lochhead on Marketing, take a screenshot of that review, email it to blackhole@lochhead.com. For the next 7 days, I am going to make a $20 donation to four of my chosen charities. We will publish on our website with full transparency, how much money we raise and how much money we gave away as a result of you participating in helping us market the new marketing podcast.The BeneficiariesWhat I’m asking you to do is rate and review the podcast, share it on social media and email us at blackhole@lochhead.com.Once you do that, we will drop $20 in one of the following charities:1. As we all know, I love animals. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is one of my chosen beneficiaries.2. Frontrow Foundation is a charity that works with people, often kids, who are facing life-threatening conditions to give them one legendary experience.3. If you’re a regular listener, I'm sure you know how much I love 1LifefullyLived.org. Founded by my buddy, Tim Rhode, this nonprofit has tried to put together programs and content around life planning and design, financial planning and design, and entrepreneurship. They try to do this as close to free as possible.4. The fourth one is a non-profit called DonorsChoose. This is an extraordinary organization that allows school teachers around the country, to tell people what they need and people can go ahead and fund those things for their students and their classrooms.  So thank you so much!
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead discusses why category creation is the new growth strategy for legendary marketing.Great companies do not focus on incremental growth, rather, they focus on being exponentially different. These leading companies introduce people to new businesses and provide them with new ways of doing things.Making A Different FutureLegendary companies shape our lives and design a different future. They are on a mission to make the future different. Further, these companies create something exciting ⁠— a new way of living, thinking and doing business ⁠— category creation. Through category creation, these companies are pioneering the way to the future.“Many times they are solving a problem we didn’t know we had—or a problem we didn’t pay attention to because we never thought there was another way.” - Christopher LochheadThese legendary companies make ordinary companies run for their lives. These ordinary companies want to profit from the world for offering it the same set of products and services.Big Es and Small EsLochhead cites different big enterprises as well as small enterprises as an example. Huge companies now started as small when they changed our way of thinking. Companies such as AirBNB, Google, Amazon, Palo Alto Networks, Cisco and Salesforce not only created great products⁠—they created a good company and a great category.“They had to courage to stand on their own to create a new category of products / services they niched down. And by designing a different niche, they got to own it.”  - Christopher LochheadCategory First, Brands Come SecondCategories make the company, not the other way around. In relation to this, if we carefully examine big brands, there are no legendary companies in a bad category. There will be no customer-recall of brands if these brands are not tailored to cater to a category.“Brands only matter if they dominate categories that matter. Category design is a new lens, play with it!” - Christopher LochheadTo hear more about Category Creation as the new growth strategy and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive ⁠— which was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 2006 for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Lochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
In this episode, Christopher Lochhead looks into the age-old marketing approach of peanut butter marketing and why it is not an applicable strategy in today’s world. Instead, he introduces us to the concept of lightning marketing, as mentioned in his first book “Play Bigger.”PB and Lightning DefinedIn Lochhead’s book “Play Bigger,” he defined the terms Lightning Strike and Peanut Butter marketing. With the traditional Peanut Butter approach, marketers spread the marketing and PR across all sorts of markets⁠—over a long period of time⁠—with the hopes that somewhere, somewhat, the message would “stick.”“Peanut butter marketing does not break through in this era of ca-co-pho-nous media and never-ending swarms of new start-ups seeking attention. A lightning strike must overcome the noise.” - Christopher LochheadIn today’s society⁠—where ads are all over social media, television, radio, and print media⁠—most people consider Peanut Butter marketing as noise. This definitely calls for a different kind of approach, hence, a lightning strike.“A Lightning Strike is an event meant to explode onto the market, grab the attention of customers, investors, analysts, and media, and make any potential competitors crap their drawers. It is the full concentration of the company’s resources on a high-intensity strike.” - Christopher Lochhead, Play BiggerGround Wars and Air WarsLochhead quotes more information from his book, this time, about ground wars and air wars. Air-wars⁠ is a campaign to change potential customers’ minds so they would consider buying from the company. On the other hand, ground wars refer to more hand-to-hand work such as lead generation, sales, calls, and closing deals.“Some companies know they need both air wars and ground wars to move their target’s brains so they then move their buying patterns. Lighting strike gets air wars off with a resounding bang. One of the best strikes is to hijack an event⁠—an industry conference or trade show⁠—where a good number of the target audience will be gathered.” - Christopher Lochhead, Play BiggerIt is a Company EventLochhead further shares that the most important thing to understand about a lightning strike is: it’s not a marketing event, it’s a company event. It becomes a forcing function for every part of the company.“Once the work is done to define the category and set up the vision, the lightning strike is meant to show the world that the category and vision are real, imminent, and inevitable.” - Christopher LochheadHe gives further advise on strategies when to best employ the lightning strike approach.To hear more about Peanut Butter vs. Lightning and more relevant information from Christopher Lochhead, download and listen to the episode.Bio:Christopher Lochhead is a Top 25 podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger.He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur.Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist.In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive ⁠— which was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 2006 for $4.5 billion.He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; was the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive.Link:Lochhead.comWe hope you enjoyed this episode of Lochhead on Marketing™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe on iTunes!
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Comments (3)

Chris McNall

Thank you for great content that you could easily charge for!!!

Sep 12th
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Real News

Lochhead distilled; the podcast which captures the essence of Lochhead's marketing philosophy surrounding category design. For a long time I have been looking to capture his pearls of wisdom in an easy to digest manner so that I could serve this up to friends and give them an insight into how to be the category king; the company that captures 76% of the market value rather than be one of the many companies slogging it out to capture 24% Sit back and drink in the wisdom!

Aug 19th
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Jeff Blain

The podcast that gives back! I first got infected by the first version this contagious Lochhead podcast, Legend and looser. The gene mutated to follow your different and now, marketing content. Its un curable, you binge them one after the other. Fantastic host, exceptional guests. Give Lochhead 20 minutes he will allow you to have a second life. This is no BS, the content is genuine. Last word would be, like the Ramones would say, Hey-ho, let's go!

Aug 12th
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