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Malicious Life

Malicious Life

Author: Cybereason

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The wildest computer hacks you could ever imagine. 500 million dollars disappear into thin air. Two teenagers disrupt a rocket launch. Foreign spies rig an election. Hosted by author and cybersecurity expert Ran Levi, Malicious Life unravels complex, dramatic historical events, with interviews from people who were actually there. Lock your door, wipe your hard drive, and come listen to fascinating stories from the cyber underground.
87 Episodes
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Hackers keep modifying and improving their methods of operations. Assaf Dahan, Sr. Director and Head of Threat Research at Cybereason, tells us about the recent shift to Blackmail - as a way to pressure Ransomware victims to pay the ransom. The post From Ransomware To Blackmail, With Assaf Dahan appeared first on Malicious Life.
SegWit2x, Part 3

SegWit2x, Part 3

2020-07-0359:104

On August 1st, 2017, Bitcoin forked. But it wasn't the SegWit2x fork everyone was talking about - It was a different fork, supported by a coalition of miners who, in doing what they were doing, were essentially ditching SegWit2x in favor of their own scaling solution. What happened here? Who betrayed SegWit2x? The post SegWit2x, Part 3 appeared first on Malicious Life.
SegWit2x, Part 2

SegWit2x, Part 2

2020-06-1949:474

SegWit2x was proposed as a solution to Bitcoin's network problems - but some people in the anti-2x movement claimed that it is nothing less than a cyber-attack: a 51% attack on Bitcoin, to be precise. This is getting ugly. The post SegWit2x, Part 2 appeared first on Malicious Life.
A black market economy has developed around Fortnite's in-game currency. Cyber criminals are hacking user accounts, juicing credit cards, and selling virtual currency for real-life dollars and cents. To ensure fun and safety for players, the cycle must be stopped. The post Hacking Fortnite Accounts (CPRadio) appeared first on Malicious Life.
In 2017, Bitcoin was winning. Money, attention, success poured out of every seam. It appeared that a golden age had dawned. But just under the surface, the network was teetering on the verge of collapse. Technical problems that were just nuisances when the community was small now became glaring and potentially lethal. Debates among tight communities of knowledgeable users and developers ballooned into full-on internet wars. Factions hardened. Heroes became enemies of the people. The post SegWit2x, or – The Year Bitcoiners Will Never Forget, Part 1 appeared first on Malicious Life.
No Honor Among Thieves

No Honor Among Thieves

2020-05-2240:463

Amit Serper was doing a routine inspection on a client's network, when he came across a suspicious-looking pen-testing tool, exhibiting RAT-like behavior. We'll follow Amit's investigation, and in the process learn the basics of cyber research. The post No Honor Among Thieves appeared first on Malicious Life.
The COVID19 pandemic forced organizations to transition to a work-from-home model - and many of them were unprepared for such a radical departure from the ‘normal’ security perimeter. Sam Curry, Cybereason's CSO, talks to Ran about the lessons learned from COVID19, and what steps should Cyber Security professionals take in order to be ready for a future outbreak. The post Cybersecurity during a crisis: how remote work has impacted security – With Sam Curry appeared first on Malicious Life.
At the end of our last episode, it kind of seemed like Huawei--the Chinese telecommunications company accused of aiding in state cyberspying--was completely innocent. They were being accused of crimes they may not have committed, based on evidence that largely did not exist. The conspiracies around them seemed unfair at best, malicious at worst. But there’s another side to this story, of course. Huawei didn’t end up on people’s radars for no reason. They’ve earned their notoriety. The post The Problem With Passwords appeared first on Malicious Life.
The Huawei Ban, Part 2

The Huawei Ban, Part 2

2020-04-2337:041

At the end of our last episode, it kind of seemed like Huawei--the Chinese telecommunications company accused of aiding in state cyberspying--was completely innocent. They were being accused of crimes they may not have committed, based on evidence that largely did not exist. The conspiracies around them seemed unfair at best, malicious at worst. But there’s another side to this story, of course. Huawei didn’t end up on people’s radars for no reason. They’ve earned their notoriety. The post The Huawei Ban, Part 2 appeared first on Malicious Life.
The Huawei Ban, Part 1

The Huawei Ban, Part 1

2020-04-0930:413

Over the past 20 years, western governments have accused Huawei of everything from IP theft to financial fraud to cyber spying. Often, these claims are made either with no evidence, or only circumstantial evidence. Is Huawei really a national security threat, or are they a political scapegoat? The post The Huawei Ban, Part 1 appeared first on Malicious Life.
On November 22nd, 1987, a hacker took over the signals of two Chicago-area TV stations and broadcast two bizarre and somewhat vulgar messages. In this episode we explore this notorious hack, and its implications on the nature of hacking in general. The post The Max Headroom Signal Hijack appeared first on Malicious Life.
The fact that ToTok came out of the United Arab Emirates is no surprise: in recent years, the UAE has deployed some of the most sophisticated mobile device exploits ever seen. But they got a lot of help from one country in particular... today’s episode is about the UAE. But it’s really about the Americans. The post ToTok, Part 3: Becoming a Spyware Superpower appeared first on Malicious Life.
The corporate structure supporting ToTok involved at least half a dozen real companies, shell companies and intelligence groups, with the individuals who actually operated the app being hidden behind other individuals given sinecure jobs and ponied around to the public as the supposed developers. Ultimately, though, every path that begins with ToTok ends with one very rich and powerful man at the heart of the Emirati state. His name is Sheikh Tahnoon bin Zayed al-Nahyan. The post ToTok, Part 2: The Masterminds of Mobile Malware appeared first on Malicious Life.
Only a few months after its release, ToTok - an ordinary messaging app, with no exceptional features - had over five million downloads, and held the number 4 position in Apple's App Store global charts. So what was it that made ToTok so popular, so quickly? The answer: nothing good. The post ToTok, Part 1: How to Convince Someone to Download Spyware appeared first on Malicious Life.
As much as we can imagine what it’s like to be a defender in a cyber-conflict, we don’t really know what it is - unless we’re in the shoes the time of it happening. That's what simulations are for. The post How To Defend A Bank, Part 2: Right Of Bang appeared first on Malicious Life.
Banks & other financial institutions face a variety of security threats: from state-sponsored cyber-attacks, to smaller acts of fraud, to thousands of random malware attacks from the web. To survive in this hostile landscape, these organizations turned to the military for inspiration. The post How To Defend A Bank, Part 1: Fusion Centers appeared first on Malicious Life.
Petro Rabigh were facing lots of problems in defending their systems. But they did get lucky in one sense: their hackers were unprepared when their plan went awry. Who were the hackers that infiltrated the Saudi petrochemical plant, and what can this breach teach us? The post Triton, Part 2: The World’s Most Dangerous Malware appeared first on Malicious Life.
Industrial Security requires a different skill set--really, an entirely different mindset than working in IT does. In this episode we dive into the story of one of the most dangerous malware ever to be discovered in the wild: Triton/Trisis. The post Triton: A Malware Designed To Kill Humans, Part 1 appeared first on Malicious Life.
Deep Fakes are set to revolutionize content creation, but alongside this technology's benefits, it also has the potential two sow havoc, fear, and distrust via Social Networks. Just this week, Facebook disclosed a network of fake users it found, whose profile images were all deep faked. So, how can we identify deep fakes - even before they go online? The post Deep Fakes, Part 2: Man Vs. Machine appeared first on Malicious Life.
Over the past two years, the internet has been inundated with celebrity Deep Fake videos of all kinds: Obama, Putin, and Trump deliver speeches they never gave, Gal Gadot "stars” in a porn video, and professional comedians such as Bill Hader eerily turn into the people they impersonate, like Tom Cruise and Arnold Schwarzenegger. What all of these videos have in common is that they were mostly created by amateur developers or small startups with tight budgets - but their quality is surprisingly good, and in some cases as good as what the biggest movie studios were able to produce with huge budgets just a few years ago. So what happened in the last five years, that turned special effects from being the exclusive domain of industry experts - into something a 14-year-old can create more or less at the touch of a button? Like the top end of a floating glacier, Deep Fakes are by and large only the visible product of a fascinating - and much deeper - technological revolution in the field of artificial intelligence. As we shall soon see, this revolution has the potential to put some very powerful tools in the hands of both attackers and defenders in the world of cyber-security. The post GAN and Deep Fakes, Part 1 appeared first on Malicious Life.
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Comments (54)

Andy Edwards

I don't think plutonium was a fuel source for Galileo, just a power source

Jul 10th
Reply

Andy Edwards

to be fair, StuxNet didn't require an insider to spread to machines that weren't connected to the internet

Jun 22nd
Reply

Andy Edwards

"aren't new decades exciting? ...are you feeling hopeful about a bright happy future ahead? Well, that's nice. Enjoy that thought" 🤣🤣🤣

Jun 22nd
Reply

N

yess thank you for covering this! Thanks Ran, hope you're well!

Apr 17th
Reply

Chauncey Bones

this episode is the best by far. old school hacking for the lulz and moral hacking. and one that has yet to be caught. bring back the vhs.

Apr 6th
Reply

Henkje

Nice episode, waiting for the next :)

Mar 7th
Reply

Brooke Venning

this episode was kinda cheesy. the dude hosts a cyber security podcast and in this episode is acting like he has never been around computers. the whole thing was just kinda lame and I usually love this podcast.

Jan 30th
Reply

Henkje

Autorun is default disabled since windows vista. This information is simply completely false. This is why i don't listen to hackable. This is how it actually works: The usb emulates a keyboard and types commands into the computer. You can see this happening, but it is fast (say 4 seconds for a payload that executes executable)

Jan 14th
Reply

Sundos Hammoud

Great podcast! informative, fun and very well-presented. You touch on very interesting topics as well, I'm hooked! Keep it up!

Dec 20th
Reply (1)

N

I didn't get a chance to respond but I just wanna say Ran I adore your accent and manner of speaking, you are a great storyteller and your pronunciations of certain words makes me grin! We all make mistakes and this has never taken away from me enjoying this show!! I But today with Trinidad and Tobago, the Tobago bit is pronounced Tah/Tuh-bay-go. thank yooou everyone who makes this show!

Oct 14th
Reply (2)

N

Haha Ran you are correct with your guess! Stand to the right side of the escalator, walk up on the left!! Those with massives suitcases at rush hour learn this fact quickly!

Sep 26th
Reply (1)

Tahn Costelloe

Great podcast series so far. Enjoying it a lot!

Aug 15th
Reply (1)

Trevor White

looks like the podcast is being promoted on castbox but no episodes show up at all in the episode list??

Aug 12th
Reply (1)

Sony Varghese

Hi... this is a repeat upload. Could you check and upload the correct episode? Thanks.

Jul 18th
Reply (1)

Googlebox

really opens your eyes to the danger of the internet

Jul 5th
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N

can I get a malicious life t-shirt still :O!?

Jun 27th
Reply (3)

Patrick Bornay

as a compsci student the code/cryptography details are very much appreciated

May 23rd
Reply (1)

N

hahah what a hilarious and bizarre ending! entertaining and educating as usual, thank you :)

May 9th
Reply (1)

Spike Robinson

Great podcast. I don't even mind the sponsor ad, because it's really on topic and relevant.

Apr 25th
Reply (1)

JACK SPARROW

man awesome podcast, I have passed this onto every engineer I know

Apr 22nd
Reply (1)
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