DiscoverMarketplace Morning Report
Marketplace Morning Report
Claim Ownership

Marketplace Morning Report

Author: Marketplace

Subscribed: 6,520Played: 242,801
Share

Description

Get up to speed on the daily news first thing in the morning with Marketplace Morning Report. Hosted by David Brancaccio, Marketplace Morning Report keeps you informed on what you may have missed when you were sleeping, kicking off each weekday with a global business update from the BBC World Service in London. In less than ten minutes, you can start off your day with a recap of the top economic and business headlines with our daily news show and podcast. David Brancaccio brings you key news updates and economic happenings in real time throughout the morning. Catch Marketplace Morning Report live every Monday through Friday to get the latest news on the markets, money, jobs and innovation.
David has been in broadcasting for more than three decades, serving as a longtime host for Marketplace and winner of both the DuPont-Columbia Award and George Foster Peabody Award. He and his team on PBS’s NOW won two Emmy Awards in 2008, as well as the 2009 Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Television Political Coverage. Marketplace Morning Report daily news podcasts are also available worldwide on platforms included Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.
959 Episodes
Reverse
A trade group for corporate chiefs, Business Roundtable, met this week and announced support for a comprehensive plan to battle climate change. Plus, airlines press for $25 billion more in aid. And, in France, government rules on wearing masks outdoors.
A directive at Facebook coming from Mark Zuckerberg himself is set to curb political talk on the company’s internal messaging network. It’s a crackdown ahead of the election. Plus, current and future racial inequities caused by unequal access to technology and training.
From the BBC World Service: The U.K. government is considering a second lockdown in England after a spike in coronavirus cases. Also, the path to a vaccine, from the head of a pharmaceutical manufacturing organization in Europe. And, a sightseeing flight to nowhere in Australia.
One explanation for an early sell-off Thursday on Wall Street is the recent gloomy assessment of the economy offered by the Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell. Plus, what’s being called the biggest sofware IPO of all time. And, the trust issue and skepticism that come with a potential COVID-19 vaccine.
From the BBC World Service: Italy is launching what it’s calling the first “COVID-free” flights in Europe, where passengers can only board once they’ve taken a coronavirus test at the airport. Also, India’s controversial decision to spend billions of dollars upgrading its Parliament building at the height of the pandemic. And, the British retailer fed up with video calls.
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell offered a dreary assessment of the economy after his policymaking team’s last interest rate meeting before the elections. The Fed plans to keep interest rates near zero through 2023. But it’s kind of limited beyond that. And, how homebuilders are trying to recruit more workers amid growing demand for new houses.
Where did Americans spend their money in August? We have the latest data. Plus, A top Senate Republican says Federal Reserve Board nominee Judy Shelton does not have enough votes for confirmation. And, this notion of the “right” COVID-19 vaccine. What does it look like?
A congressional report blasts both Boeing and the FAA for actions that led to two fatal crashes of the 737 Max jets. Plus, why people are voluntarily quitting their jobs in a pandemic. And, a new California law that will make it easier for the formerly incarcerated to become firefighters or EMTs.
From the BBC World Service: BP CEO Bernard Looney explains his plans to shift the company’s focus away from oil and gas and toward shale, green energy and renewables. Also, the push for European battery production for electric vehicles. And, will consumers really trust fallen travel giant Thomas Cook under new owners?
What will the holiday shopping season look like? A new analysis suggests numbers could actually be up. Plus, why Apple might be waiting to unveil a new iPhone model. Also, another automaker settles over emissions cheating. And, Bill Gates on coronavirus vaccine development.
The Federal Open Market Committee meets again this week. It’s not expected to change interest rates, so what can we expect? Plus, Dr. Larry Brilliant, an epidemiologist, brings his experience of helping to eradicate smallpox to our current pandemic.
From the BBC World Service: Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates has warned that richer countries aren’t doing enough to make sure a potential coronavirus vaccine is available for developing nations. Also, Greg Kelly, the former Nissan executive and ally of former CEO Carlos Ghosn, pleads not guilty to financial misconduct charges in Tokyo court. And, fears that the U.K.’s furlough plan for workers could be ending too soon.
TikTok wants to join forces with Oracle — but it’s not exactly a sale like the Trump administration ordered. Plus, speaking of executive orders, the president has signed one aimed at lowering drug prices for Medicare. And, Tracy Chapman is suing Nicki Minaj in a case that could upend the way artists borrow from each other.
From the BBC World Service: The status of TikTok’s U.S. operations is uncertain as China looks set to block any sale to a U.S. tech firm. But is a partnership happening instead? Also, another geopolitical tech row over the planned sale of the U.K. chip designer Arm to U.S. firm Nvidia. And, Yoshihide Suga is set to take over as Japan’s new prime minister.
Nvidia, which makes microchips for video games, is buying Arm Holdings — a quietly ubiquitous tech company. We’ll get to why this is such a big deal for things like smartphones. Plus, TikTok, Oracle and President Donald Trump. And, the potential for global cooperation when it comes to distributing a future COVID-19 vaccine.
We look into what distribution for a COVID-19 vaccine would logistically mean for the air cargo industry. Then, we discuss how venture money is shifting to tech hubs in the middle of the country.
CItigroup announces that Jane Fraser will become its CEO in February. She’ll be the first woman in charge of a global megabank. We dive into New York City’s COVID recovery on the anniversary of 9/11. Also, even in a pandemic, smoking in casinos is still a thing – and a gamble in itself.
From the BBC World Service: The Rio Tinto CEO has resigned after shareholder pressure, when Aboriginal caves were destroyed to make way for an iron ore mine. Also, how do you plan the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine?
We also talk about the widening wealth gap, as the group Oxfam reports how corporations are raking in profits during the pandemic. Diane Swonk discusses the markets with us.
Senators will vote on a “skinny” economic relief plan. Also, indoor dining is about to return to New York. We also take a look at the ripple effect of Mexico’s struggling economy.
loading
Comments (9)

julie dodge

So, what else did we learn. Federal Employees jobs are not what they used to be. Federal Employees usually make less then their Private Sector counterparts. It is a trade off for job security. Federal Job security is gone and a lot of Federal employees live paycheck to paycheck. American, we are supposed to be better than this.

Feb 13th
Reply

Arno Bosley

w I

Jan 24th
Reply

Arno Bosley

w

Jan 24th
Reply

Arno Bosley

be by

Jan 24th
Reply

Arno Bosley

v

Jan 24th
Reply

Mario Velasco

.

Jan 10th
Reply

iTunes User

A good taste of Marketplace. I am not able to listen at the "right" time to catch Marketplace over the air so this is a good replacement. It would be great if they could put the full broadcast up! I would even contribute to my local station. Honest! :)

Aug 30th
Reply

iTunes User

I enjoy the Marketplace Morning Report podcasts immensely as they are a great summary of what is happening in the markets. However, the reason I don't give it a higher score is that they are inconsistent as to the time the podcast becomes available. I download several podcasts in the morning(at about the same time, 8 am Eastern, every work day) and take my iPod to with me so I can listen as I review the morning e-mails, etc. It is hit or miss on whether I get this podcast or not.

Aug 30th
Reply

iTunes User

The Marketplace Morning Report is another fantastic show from American Public Media, showcasing the breaking business and personal finance news stories for the coming day. At just under fifteen minutes long (on NPR in the mornings, the podcast is even shorter than that!), I am always left wanting more. I would love for the Marketplace Morning Report to be as long as Marketplace! 30 minutes would be perfect. I won't knock the Marketplace Morning Report down a star for being too short, though. Like Kai Ryssdal (host of Marketplace and Marketplace Money), Marketplace Morning Report host Scott Jagow has the knack for turning what could be very bland business and personal finance news into stories that anyone would be interested in listening to. He has a perfect combination of knowledge and wit that really helps to keep a person awake on that early morning drive to the office. Unlike Marketplace and Marketplace Money, the Marketplace Morning Report has always been a free podcast. (The other two were previously only available via a paid subscription through Audible.) If you only have 10 minutes to listen to a few money-related stories, check out the Marketplace Morning Report. You probably won't be sorry you did!

Aug 30th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store