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Marketplace

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Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn’t just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what’s happening in the stock market and how macroeconomic policy can affect you and your business. Monday through Friday, our team speaks with a wide range of industry professionals– from small business owners to Fortune 500 CEOs, Marketplace breaks down complex topics related to business and the economy without industry jargon and over complicated explanations. 
Kai Ryssdal has led the program since 2005 and has hosted the program from China, the Middle East and dozens of cities across the United States. As a leading public media voice, Kai has been a trusted broadcaster for two decades and is the recipient of the DuPont-Columbia Award, a George Foster Peabody Award and an Emmy. Produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM) our popular business news podcasts are available worldwide on Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, and RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.
369 Episodes
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… And both are banned under a new executive order from President Donald Trump. Today, we’ll talk about the ripple effects both on consumers, businesses, U.S.-China relations and the broader internet. Plus: futures contracts for water, remote learning and how museums are faring in the pandemic.
Remember the trade war?

Remember the trade war?

2020-09-1727:352

Due to pandemic recession and political friction, investment between the U.S. and China may have fallen to its lowest level in nine years. Plus: the LGBTQ economy, gyms going out of business and why Chuck E. Cheese wants to destroy seven billion prize tickets.
Wear a mask, people

Wear a mask, people

2020-09-1627:272

Starting this week, not wearing one on the New York City subway could cost you $50. We’re talking about the behavioral economics in a pandemic today. Plus: retail sales, all the movies being pushed back and, of course, the latest from Fed Chair Jerome Powell.
The COVID-19 diet

The COVID-19 diet

2020-09-1527:252

No, not that kind of diet. We’re kicking off the show today talking about food: where we go out to eat it, where we buy it. First up, we’ll examine the hiring slowdown in restaurants, then we’ll look at the rise of online-only “dark” grocery stores. Later, we’ll look at N95 mask laws to protect agriculture workers and others who are in the smoke right now. Plus: election money, dentists and college esports.
The tick-tock on TikTok

The tick-tock on TikTok

2020-09-1427:252

In the saga over the Chinese video app TikTok, Walmart and Microsoft are out and Oracle is in. They’re close to a deal, but Chinese media is reporting that Oracle won’t be getting TikTok’s algorithm. We’ll take you through what that would mean. Plus stories about volunteer firefighters, frequent fliers and Black women entrepreneurs in Detroit.
It’s been 184 days, or six months, since the coronavirus pandemic started. Today, we’re gonna check in on how things are going with our personal economies, with the stalled federal relief plan, with Brexit (remember Brexit?) and more. But oh, that all sounds like a drag, let’s get excited for the next “Verzuz.”
Churn, baby, churn

Churn, baby, churn

2020-09-1028:202

More than 800,000 people filed new state unemployment claims last week, but job gains are way up, too. Today on the show: what churn in the labor market can tell us about this economy. Plus: Voting at arenas, wildfire insurance and why homeowners are better equipped for this recession than renters. The story about voting in arenas in this episode contained an error that has been corrected. For more information, visit the episode page at marketplace.org
Change is in the air

Change is in the air

2020-09-0926:161

And not just because it’s nearly fall. Today, we’re looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed all kinds of businesses, like trans-Pacific trade, luxury retail, petroleum barges and takeout. Plus, we’ll follow several workers as they journey back to the office after months away to pick up their stuff.
Long before he’d start Netflix, consider selling it to Blockbuster for a song and get a 10-year head start in the streaming wars, Reed Hastings was getting coffee at a dot-com company. On today’s show, Hastings will tell us about Netflix’s path to dominance and where it’s going next. Plus: “Tenet’s” box office performance, the thousands of furloughs turning into layoffs and Angela Merkel’s economic legacy.
For workers who have been at home all summer, many of whom lack AC, the heat this summer has been a bigger problem than the past. And it’s only getting worse with a record-breaking heat wave hitting California this Labor Day weekend. Electricity use has decreased overall during the pandemic, but residential energy use is up. Basically, workers — for the most part — are paying for AC themselves. But some states have strict reimbursement laws for working-at-home costs. Plus: hotels are still struggling, only 3% of financial regulators in the U.S. have been Black and talking to kids about money requires honesty.
Under normal circumstances, gaining 1.4 million jobs in August would have been incredible for this economy. But this isn’t any other August, and it comes a few months after the U.S. lost a full 15% of its jobs. On today’s show, we’ll look at the progress the country is making digging out of that hole. Plus: home refinancing, Campbell’s soup and the life of a children’s entertainer in the age of Zoom birthday parties.
The Adjustment Bureau

The Adjustment Bureau

2020-09-0327:001

First-time unemployment claims were down last week to about 881,000, their lowest point since the pandemic started. But last week was also the first report since the Bureau of Labor Statistics changed how it does seasonal adjustment. That’s a formula the bureau uses so it doesn’t seem like the sky is falling when thousands of seasonal jobs disappear in January. But now the sky really is falling, so the adjustment needed adjusting. We’ll explain. Plus: Farmers’ economic outlook, racial inequities in health and what it’s like running a mall right now.
It’s been nearly six months since the COVID-19 pandemic slammed the U.S. economy. Economic recovery remains sluggish and, as of July, only 40% of the newly unemployed were working again. Now, workers who were temporarily furloughed face permanent layoffs and long-term unemployment, defined as lasting more than 26 weeks. At that point, jobless benefits begin to run out. Plus: E-scooters are back, remittances are rebounding and manufacturing is surging.  
Last year, Black women earned 62 cents on the dollar compared to white men. Now, Black women are among the hardest hit in this recession, and some economists want policy to reflect that. We’re going to spend much of the show today talking about how to rebuild the economy to be more equitable and fair. But first: the economics of K-pop, weighting blankets and Walmart vs. Amazon.
Credit card balances were down $76 billion in the second quarter as Americans cut back on spending. Chase is trying a different tack to get clients during the pandemic: cash back on groceries and drug store purchases. U.S. Bank recently launched a card with perks for takeout and streaming services, and another new card, called Grand Reserve, offers points when you buy wine. Plus: Americans are producing a lot more residential trash and how New York subway cuts could hurt essential workers.
Schools across the country are welcoming students back in person, online or some hybrid of the two. But how are schools handling students’ mental health during this extra-stressful time? Some are using mental health hotlines and virtual counseling while others are offering socially distanced in-person help. Plus: Personal incomes were surprisingly up in July, yet another retail bankruptcy and what trucking has to do with economic recovery.
They have real power, too, and they’re using it. As pros in at least five leagues decline to play in protest of police brutality, we’ll look at what kind of leverage athletes have and what could be coming. Plus, we’ll look at how several small businesses are coping right now and check in with an Iowa farmer after the devastating storm there a couple weeks ago.
Experts say the country needs to be testing for COVID-19 at over five times its current rate. Today, we’ll talk with a testing lab manager in Washington state about how things are going. Plus: The latest durable goods numbers, the economic impact of storm evacuations and a conversation with a Black banker.
Not literally. But, you know, that couldn’t hurt. No, today we’re talking about consumer confidence, which is now at a six-year low. We’ll talk about why consumers are feeling worse, and what it means for the economic outlook. Plus: changes in the Dow, the hottest summer ever and a conversation with a doctor who’s also school board president.
Three decades ago, the wealthiest 10% of Americans owned 79% of the stocks and mutual funds in the market. Now they own 87%. So when Wall Street hits record highs, like it is now, the millions of Americans laid off, furloughed or just squeaking by are largely left out. We’ll talk about it. Plus: Trump’s second-term agenda, the new unemployment benefits now available in two states, that Zoom outage and … yeah, we need a drink. We’ll take you to a new Black-owned brewery in Inglewood, California.
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Comments (31)

Patrecia Sapulette

plot twist: Girl is brokenhearted about her home destruction etc. and wants to flee the area,but accepted the engagement in confusion about the situation. Later on the girl leave,and Brandon stay in his home...😋 haha.

Sep 15th
Reply

Jason

#learnMMT

Jul 16th
Reply

SARABETH CLAEYS

Kai, why don't you say: Whites control the reigns of America's economy. Whites are behind the inequities in housing and the justice system. Whites are responsible for the poor medical outcomes for many minorities. All of this is true but its weird to say it that way. So why did you keep calling black people "blacks". You did it over and over. Why did you do that?

Jun 3rd
Reply

Louis Reynolds

The design of the American economy doesn't allow its majority of its workers to be sick and stay financially healthy.

Feb 28th
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Vernon Shoemaker

My first thought was that tax cuts can be paid for with more Iranian sanctions, but I'm unsure of that. Then I wondered why you need to pay at all since the government is only creating a medium that circulates, why demand a returned portion with earned value. That is, printed money is worthless until it's immersed in an economy that creates value. Then there's the aspect of time. Expenditure is a timeline and revenue is a separate one and the difference is government debt, at each concurrent point. Unlike the Kansans who play that movie and close schools, the federal government doesn't have to annually balance because it's budget is included in the entire economy and if it's not too great a loser the economy supports it. Increased debt derived from shortfall that supposedly creates conditions for growth is dependent on growth to be negligible as a dead, unproductive portion. It's necessary because the private sector doesn't support and invest in certain necessary services, like war. I suppose tax has the same effect as inflation, but I'm unsure of that too.

Jan 22nd
Reply

Timothy Webb

love this show #NPR

Jan 1st
Reply (2)

BeantownJewels

YES, YES, AND YES!

Oct 22nd
Reply (1)

Dharam Sookram

love the new segment "Kai Explains"... why then do I rename it "Man-splaning, with Kai" everytime it comes on...lol

Oct 4th
Reply

Shani Lynn

Thanks! Loved it!

Jul 29th
Reply (1)

Mark Matthieu

Farmers are nervous and need help, but they will vote Trump again. Damn those ideologues

May 11th
Reply

Dharam Sookram

the podcast has long stretches of no audio

May 8th
Reply (2)

Mark Matthieu

This is such a great podcast. I'm always amazed at what they are able to do in such a short time.

Apr 26th
Reply

Mel Vis

Very disappointed in the cavalier and dismissive comments from Kai regarding the Mueller report. He lost his credibility as a journalist and gained a reputation for condoning illicit behavior. Confirms the belief that Wall street supports corruption.

Apr 20th
Reply

Strang3rDang3r

hell yeah El Ten Eleven used as intermission music! for anyone that wanted to know the song that starts at 12:15, its called My Only Swerving

Feb 15th
Reply

Strang3rDang3r

lol what a disingenuous and ridiculous assessment of this issue. are you kidding me? "yeah the federal government forces me to get their tenuous licensing and approval for my small business, but now the govt is shut down. they won't approve me, but they'll fine me or shut me down if I keep working, it really sucks." WELL WELL WELL, SOUNDS LIKE SMALL BUSINESSES LOVE REGULATIONS!! how STUPID is that logic. clearly this doesn't show that we need government regulators, it shows that we need competition in the regulatory and standards market (3rd party testing and licensing) because the government regulatory monopoly is unreliable and fails the second the idiots in Washington can't agree on how much further debt they're going to put our country in.

Jan 17th
Reply

Benjamin Lyon

known unknown = the rest of the story :)

Jan 15th
Reply

Zach Johnson

The sound does not work 100%. can hear but it's hard.

Dec 26th
Reply

John Roberts

What is the assertion that "another reason the medical industry relies fax machines; it's more secure than e-mail" based on? The entire story before that was about how insecure fax machines are, and then instead of a conclusion we get tossed an unsupported claim. If it's more secure than email then I would have hoped the rest of the story would have been "stop sending email and start using your fax machine again" but it wasn't because that doesn't make sense to anybody.

Aug 15th
Reply

Matthew Chagan

30

Aug 8th
Reply

Chris Horton

Mr. Kudlow's prognostication sounds all green grass and high tides. But he always left an a carefully placed out should he be wrong. He only seems to look at the big GDP numbers and ignores the scores of businesses that are currently being hurt by tariffs. The possibility that these tariff hurt businesses can result in lower future GDP is something he would not acknowledge. Lastly, it is almost impossible for the EU to take all the soybeans that China was taking simply due to the shear volume that China was taking.

Aug 4th
Reply
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