DiscoverMind Matters
Mind Matters
Claim Ownership

Mind Matters

Author: Emily Kircher-Morris

Subscribed: 355Played: 4,463
Share

Description

The Mind Matters podcast features discussions with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, with an emphasis on gifted/talented and 2e (twice-exceptional) children and adults. Mind Matters explores parenting, counseling techniques, and best practices for enriching the lives of high-ability people.
57 Episodes
Reverse
It’s no secret that gifted kids often see the world differently than neurotypical peers. They also see the coronavirus pandemic differently, and experience stress and anxiety in different ways. We talk with Dr. Edward Amend about life in a pandemic, how to talk with kids about this event, things we can do to minimize anxiety, and how counseling and therapy sessions are adapting to meet the requirements of quarantine. It’s all on episode 57 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Edward R. Amend, Psy.D., is a Clinical Psychologist at The Amend Group in Lexington, KY. He has worked in both private practice and community mental health settings, as well as in consulting positions with clinics, hospitals, schools, and other organizations. Dr. Amend is co-author of A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children, and Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders. Dr. Amend has held various positions, including on the Board of Directors of Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted (SENG); President of the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education (KAGE) and Chair for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Counseling and Guidance Network. He has been a consultant to the Davidson Institute for Talent Development and a Contributing Editor for Roeper Review, a peer-reviewed journal for gifted education. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
The world is at the same time both together and necessarily apart. We’re all going through the same pandemic, and most of us are practicing “social distancing.” How does that affect us? Some believe it can be a time for growth, and that’s the subject of episode 56. Our guest is author and family therapist Chris Crutcher, and this is a conversation you and your family won’t want to miss. About the guest - Chris Crutcher is a native of Cascade, Idaho. He spent the 1970s as a teacher, then as director of a K-12 alternative school in Oakland, California. The following 20+ years he was a therapist specializing in child abuse and neglect. Those years largely inform his thirteen novels and two collections of short stories. He has also written what he calls an ill-advised autobiography titled King of the Mild Frontier, which was designated by Publisher’s Weekly as “the YA book most adults would have read if they knew it existed.” Chris was awarded the American Library Association’s Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as two Intellectual Freedom awards, one from the National Council for Teachers of English and the other from the National Coalition Against Censorship.  Five of his books appeared on an American Library Association list of the 100 Best Books for Teens of the Twentieth Century (1999 to 2000). You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
There are social, academic, and personal obstacles inherent to boys, and when you add other features like giftedness, things can get complicated. How can we help boys understand social expectations, and learn to be themselves, often in spite of those expectations? Dr. Tom Hébert talks with us about the things he’s learned as an educator, and as a trainer of educators working in gifted education. About the guest - Thomas Hébert, Ph.D., is a Professor of Gifted and Talented Education in the College of Education at the University of South Carolina. He has more than a decade of K-12 classroom experience working with gifted students and over 20 years in higher education training graduate students and educators in gifted education. He has also conducted research for the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. He served on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and the Association for the Gifted of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) and has been a consultant to numerous schools nationally and internationally. His research interests include social and emotional development of gifted students, gifted culturally diverse students, and problems faced by gifted young men. His publications include over 100 refereed journal articles, book chapters, and scholarly reports. He is the author of the award-winning text Understanding the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Students. He has received numerous research and teaching awards including the 2000 Early Scholar Award from the National Association for Gifted Children, and the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
What is Pathological Demand Avoidance and how does it manifest among the neurodiverse? What can we do to educate parents, teachers, and counselors about how to approach it? Understanding demand avoidance can completely transform the way you look at a child. Harry J. Thompson joins Emily Kircher-Morris for this important discussion about PDA, on episode 54. About the guest - Harry J. Thompson was born in Edgware, and grew up in Barnet in north London. He is currently based in London, UK. An avid reader & researcher, Harry speaks publicly and is heavily involved in projects & research on all topics around neurodiversity and autism; namely, Pathological Demand Avoidance. Harry began to write the first draft of his book in 2015. After connecting with many autistic & PDA families, he pivoted his direction and completed his book in about 6 weeks, a memoir entitled the PDA Paradox: The Highs and Lows of My Life on a Little-Known Part of the Autism Spectrum, published in February 2019. He launched his YouTube channel in 2017. Harry has been elected to a Fellowship of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), in recognition of his work in the field of PDA, and also in recognition of the publication of his book. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Emily Kircher-Morris and Dr. Ellen Braaten discuss processing speed and why it’s important. They also talk about when it’s not so important, and why it varies so much from child to child. They discuss the impact it has on intelligence testing scores, and ways to help kids increase their processing speed. Dr. Braaten is coauthor of the book Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up. About the guest -  Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Track Director of the Child Psychology Training Program at MGH/Harvard Medical School. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten received her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Colorado, her PhD in Psychology at Colorado State University, and completed her internship training at Massachusetts General Hospital. She has been affiliated with Mass. General Hospital since 1998. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attentional disorders. She is the co-author of Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up, and Straight Talk about Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She also authored The Child Clinician's Report Writing Handbook, which has been called "the most comprehensive child assessment handbook available." Her most recent book for parents is entitled Finding the Right Mental Health Care for Your Child, published by the American Psychological Association. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
When a child asks a question, do you just give them the answer? If so, you’re missing an opportunity to help them develop critical thinking skills. On episode 52 we are joined by Colin Seale, founder of ThinkLaw, an organization committed to helping educators teach critical thinking. We talk about how kids learn the skill, and how teachers can better teach critical thinking. About the guest - Colin Seale is a critical thinking expert, achievement-gap educator, child welfare reformer, education-for-all advocate, and former attorney who founded ThinkLaw—an award-winning program that helps educators teach critical thinking to all students using real-life legal cases and other Socratic and powerful inquiry strategies. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Why is there a bright line between academia and the arts? Between cognition and creativity? Where should that line break down? Or should it? And, why do educators and others think of creativity only in terms of art or music, when it also applies to problem solving and cognition? We talk with Dr. Jennifer Fisher, who is both a university assistant teaching professor and an art education coordinator. We talk about how to bridge that gap, and hear from a gifted student’s struggle to be academic and artistic. About the guest - Jennifer Fisher, PhD, is an Assistant Teaching Professor and Coordinator of Art Education in the Department of Educator Preparation, Innovation and Research in the College of Education at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. She is a joint faculty member in the Department of Art & Design within the College of Arts and Sciences.  She holds a teaching certificate in the state of Missouri, where she is certified to teach Art K-12, Gifted K-12, and English Language Arts 5-12. She received a B.S.Ed. in Secondary Education-Art from Southeast Missouri State University in 2009. Dr. Fisher also earned a Master of Special Education-Gifted and Talented from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2011, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Teaching and Learning Processes from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2016. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
On episode 50 we talk with Haley Taylor Schlitz, a 17-year-old first-year law student who began college at age 13. We discuss her education experience, some of the benefits and barriers of homeschooling, and we imagine what the perfect public school system would be like. About the guest - At age 17, Haley Taylor Schlitz has graduated from Texas Woman's University with a BS in Interdisciplinary Studies, and has chosen to attend SMU Dedman School of Law, after being accepted to many prestigious law schools. Homeschooling allowed her to advance through high-school at her own pace, graduating at age 13, ready for college. Haley excelled as an honors student while representing the College of Professional Education as a Student Senator. Additionally, Haley has been actively involved in meaningful extracurricular activities such as The Representation Project, where she works to eliminate limiting stereotypes in the media, and serve as a catalyst for cultural transformation. Haley lives with her family in Fort Worth, Texas. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
As we move into the 2020s, we look back at some of the conversations we had in the two years of our podcast’s history. While we covered a variety of subjects, one seemed to pop up just above the fray. We’re revisiting some of our best conversations about twice-exceptionality, on this special 49th episode of Mind Matters. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Shopping for the holidays can be a headache, but choosing the right gifts for high-ability kids is extra-challenging. Between meal planning and decorating, Jen Merrill found time to pop in with holiday stories and gift ideas, and Emily divulges her darker history as a “peeker.” Shopping for the hard-to-buy-for kids in your life, on this special holiday edition of Mind Matters. About our guest - Jen Torbeck Merrill is an Illinois-based writer and gifted family advocate. The mom of two teen sons, she homeschooled one and is happily watching her public schooler thrive. She is a music educator by trade, with degrees in Music Education and Flute Performance. Still, long before she picked up a flute as a child, Jen wanted to be a writer. She began that career in 2006, focusing on gifted families and advocacy. Her book, If This is a Gift, Can I Send It Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice-Exceptional, struck a nerve with families who suspected Jen was living in their closet. Her second book, on the needs of gifted parents and self-care, is in progress. Jen has branched out into greater advocacy in gifted issues, particularly the needs of parents, personalized learning for gifted and twice-exceptional kids, and giftedness as wiring throughout life. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Often, gifted kids feel isolated and unable to find like-minded peers, so they end up lacking opportunities to socialize and communicate. Dr. Jean Peterson joins us to talk about ways to bring gifted kids into the conversation, including tips on conducting gifted discussion circles and group counseling. Getting kids talking - on episode 47 of Mind Matters. About the guest - Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D., Professor Emerita and former Director of School Counselor Preparation at Purdue University, was a classroom and gifted-education teacher for many years and was involved in teacher education prior to graduate work in counseling at The University of Iowa. She is author of Get Gifted Students Talking, Gifted at Risk: Poetic Profiles, and The Essential Guide to Talking with Gifted Teens, as well as over 100 journal articles, books, and invited chapters. She is a former chair of the Counseling and Guidance Network and also served two terms on the NAGC Board of Directors. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
In this bonus episode, Emily Kircher-Morris talks about uncertainty and doubt. How can we help our kids be less afraid of uncertainty, and more comfortable with doubt? And for advocates of gifted kids, she explains why it’s better to say “I don’t know” than jump to conclusions from anecdotal evidence. This is a bonus episode of Mind Matters, as Emily shares her thoughts after the National Association of Gifted Children’s annual conference, where she found the topic of uncertainty trending. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
How can educators, counselors, and parents help neuro-diverse kids learn executive functioning skills? Gifted and twice-exceptional kids often lag with this skill development, so we’ll talk about tools and techniques you can use to help kids grow. Our guest is Brendan Mahan, an ADHD/executive functioning consultant and speaker, a veteran educator, and the host of a podcast called ADHD Essentials. Executive functioning, on episode 45. About the guest - Brendan Mahan, MEd., MS, is an ADHD/executive function consultant, coach, and speaker. As a veteran educator, he is skilled at teaching people how to effectively manage the challenges they face. He and his twin sons have ADHD, and he enjoys helping others with ADHD meet the challenges they face. Brendan is also host of the ADHD Essentials podcast. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
We’ve had mixed results in our efforts to identify 2e kids. It’s a complicated process, and many of the assessment tools used to identify ASD and other disorders need to be utilized differently when working with gifted individuals. Megan Foley-Nicpon joins us on episode 44 to tell us what she’s learned through various research projects about identifying the elusive 2e child. About the guest - Megan Foley-Nicpon is an Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology and Associate Director for Research and Clinic at the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development, both at the University of Iowa. Dr. Foley-Nicpon’s research and clinical interests include assessment and intervention with twice-exceptional students, particularly gifted students with Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD, and emotional/learning difficulties, and the social and emotional development of talented and diverse students. She has over 35 referred articles and book chapters in the areas of gifted, counseling psychology, and twice-exceptionality. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
School counselors wear a variety of hats, but “giftedness expert” often isn't one of them. On episode 43, Jean Peterson and Susannah Wood, authors of Counseling Gifted Students: A Guide for School Counselors, join us to talk about ways school counselors can better meet the needs of their gifted students. About the guests - Jean Sunde Peterson, Ph.D., Professor Emerita and former director of school counselor preparation at Purdue University, was a classroom and gifted-education teacher for many years and was involved in teacher education prior to graduate work in counseling at The University of Iowa. She is author of Gifted at Risk: Poetic Profiles, and The Essential Guide to Talking with Gifted Teens, and is co-editor of Models of Counseling Gifted Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults, among over 100 journal articles, books, and invited chapters. She is a former chair of the Counseling and Guidance Network and also served two terms on the NAGC Board of Directors. Susannah Wood, Ph.D., is currently an Associate Professor at The University of Iowa, where she teaches both doctoral students and students who are pursuing their master’s in school counseling with an emphasis in gifted education in partnership with The Connie Belin and Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talented Development. Susannah received her M.Ed. in School Counseling and Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from The College of William and Mary. She’s co-author of the book Counseling Gifted Students: A Guide for School Counselors. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Advanced Placement is a good way for many kids to get a head start on college. On episode 42, Andrew Scanlan and Chester E Finn, Jr. of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, answer questions about the history of AP, where it’s going, and where kids may encounter difficulties. About the guests - Chester E. Finn, Jr. is Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, and a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. He served as Fordham’s President from 1997 to 2014, after many earlier roles in education, academe and government. Over the years he has served in various capacities, including Counselor to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education and Staff Assistant to the President of the United States. Finn currently serves on the National Council on Teacher Quality, the Core Knowledge Foundation, and Maryland’s Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education. Author of over twenty books, Finn is co-author with Andrew Scanlan of Learning in the Fast Lane: The Past, Present & Future of Advanced Placement, which has just been released, and Failing Our Brightest Kids: The Global Challenge of Educating High-Ability Students, co-authored with Brandon L. Wright. Andrew Scanlan is a research and policy associate at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Growing up in Ireland, he graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a B.A. in European Studies before spending two years living in Honduras as a second grade classroom teacher and school administrator for Bilingual Education for Central America (BECA). He earned an M.A. in International Child Studies from King's College London, with a focus on children’s rights, education, and child migration. He is co-author, with Chester E. Finn, Jr., of Learning in the Fast Lane: The Past, Present, and Future of Advanced Placement. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/mindmatters.
This is the final installment of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e people. Today, Lisa shares the story of what led to her son’s suicide, and we get a glimpse into her current state of mind, nine months after her Nick’s death. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
In part two of our series on suicide among high-ability people, we explore some of the signs of depression and suicidal ideation with Lisa Van Gemert, author of Perfectionism, and Living Gifted. We explore ways to identify problems that could lead to self-harm or suicide, and suggest ways to help you work through those problems. If you haven’t listened to episode 39 with Dr. Tracy Cross, we suggest you do. And as always, if you need help, the Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours every day at 1-800-273-8255. About the guest - Lisa Van Gemert is an expert consultant to television shows including Lifetime’s “Child Genius,” and a writer of award-winning lesson plans. She has written numerous published articles on social psychology and pedagogy, and is the author of two books - Perfectionism: A Practical Guide to Managing Never Good Enough, and Living Gifted: 52 Tips to Survive and Thrive in Giftedland. She is a co-founder of The Gifted Guild, a professional community for educators of the gifted. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
Is suicidal ideation more prevalent among the gifted population? Do our beliefs about suicide square with statistics? In part one of our series on suicide among gifted and 2e youth, Dr. Tracy Cross joins us to shed some light on a dark subject, and shares his Spiral Model of the Suicidal Mind. This is a series all parents should hear. About the guest - Dr. Tracy L. Cross holds an endowed chair, Jody and Layton Smith Professor of Psychology and Gifted Education, and is the executive director of the Center for Gifted Education and the Institute for Research on the Suicide of Gifted Students at William & Mary. He has a PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an EdS in Educational Psychology and Guidance from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, an MS in Educational Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a BS in Education from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received the Distinguished Service Award from The Association for the Gifted (TAG) and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), the Early Leader, Early Scholar and Distinguished Scholar awards from NAGC, and in 2009 was given the Lifetime Achievement Award from the MENSA Education and Research Foundation. He has edited seven journals and is the current editor of the Journal for the Education of the Gifted. He presently serves as President of TAG and is president emeritus of NAGC. Among other books, he’s the co-author of Suicide Among Gifted Children and Adolescents. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
As parents and educators prepare for the start of the new school year, middle schools everywhere are welcoming a new crop of excited, nervous, and sometimes unprepared kids. On episode 38 we talk about the middle school transition, and the changes parents can expect to see as their kids adapt to their new surroundings. Guest Phyllis Fagell is author of Middle School Matters, and she joins us with ideas and advice. About our guest - Phyllis Fagell is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, Certified Professional School Counselor and journalist. She has worked in both public and private schools with students in grades K-12, focusing on middle school for the last several years. She currently works full time as the school counselor for Sheridan School in Washington, D.C. Sheridan School has been named a 2017 National School of Character. Phyllis also provides therapy to children, teens and adults in private practice at the Chrysalis Group, Inc. As a journalist, Phyllis writes regular columns for The Washington Post on counseling, parenting and education. She writes a weekly advice column for PDK, Intl. for educators, and she blogs for a number of highly-respected national education associations and counseling publications, including AMLE (Association of Middle Level Educators) and Character.org. Her articles often are syndicated by Bloomberg, and they also are reprinted by newspapers throughout the world. The Mind Matters podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram at Mind Matters Podcast, and on Twitter @MindMattersPod. For more information go to www.MindMattersPodcast.com. Thank you for caring about kids. Copyright © 2019 Morris Creative Services LLC. All rights reserved.
loading
Comments 
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store