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Money Talks from Economist Radio
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Money Talks from Economist Radio

Author: The Economist

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Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Tuesday on Economist Radio.

255 Episodes
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Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts  For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.   And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
At the beginning of a financial year like no other, millions of newly furloughed or unemployed Americans face rent and mortgage payments. How long can the financial system withstand the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic? Many employees have had to make a quick transition to remote working. Businesses struggling to make the switch could look to those companies that have never had an office. And, a day in the life of Bartleby—and his cat. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
In a desperate attempt to slow the spread of covid-19, governments around the world are ordering residents to stay at home. As the number of fatalities increases, so do the corporate casualties. Which companies are worst-hit and how long will they be closed? And, as Americans stock up on goods in preparation for lockdown, a peek into the pantry shows the scale of the challenge facing one of the country's core industries–dairy. Plus, can global trade weather the economic havoc caused by the virus? Simon Long hosts.    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer and read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
America’s Federal Reserve cut interest rates to close to zero to try to ease the economic pain caused by the outbreak of covid-19. What more can central banks do? And, why are many companies fleeing to cash? As consumers race to buy pasta and toilet rolls, what are governments shopping for? Simon Long hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer And go to www.economist.com/coronavirus for our full coverage on the virus. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Financial markets are reeling from a new “Black Monday” which saw oil prices tumble and stocks plunge in the most brutal day for the market since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. Slumping demand caused by the spread of the novel coronavirus has sparked a crude-oil price war. What are the ramifications? And, how the virus is boosting a fledgling Chinese industry. Patrick Lane hosts  ____________________ Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer ____________________ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The Federal Reserve has cut interest rates in the face of increasing concern about the economic impact of the new coronavirus. It follows warnings from forecasters that the outbreak could tip some countries into recession. What more needs to be done to prevent a full-scale downturn? The Economist’s Europe economics correspondent Rachana Shanbhogue asks Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor; Alice Fulwood, American finance correspondent; and Henry Tricks, Schumpeter columnist Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Stockmarkets saw some of the sharpest falls in years after a rise in new coronavirus cases. Is a global economic downturn on the cards? Also, Argentina faces serious debt difficulties—can it strike a new deal with the International Monetary Fund? And, Professor Diane Coyle, from Cambridge University, on the importance of the “data economy”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Coronavirus is causing unprecedented supply and demand challenges for the global economy. How can businesses minimise economic damage? Also, why are MBA schools in China thriving? And, the cities rebelling against the cashless revolution. Patrick Lane hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
As the Wuhan coronavirus continues to spread, what effect will factory closures in China have on global supply chains? Also, how technology is finally poised to disrupt the market for real estate. And what it takes to be a CEO in 2020. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
After Britain’s official departure from the European Union on January 31st, the government faces a divergence dilemma: departing from the EU's rules may mean less access to its markets. The Economist’s Britain business editor Tamzin Booth explains the costs and opportunities of a directive-free future. And Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, and city financier Dame Helena Morrissey discuss what government and business must do to adapt. Patrick Lane hosts ____________________ Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer ____________________ For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Concern over the new coronavirus caused global stockmarkets to fall. Could the Wuhan virus hurt economic growth in China more than the SARS virus did? Also, how can India’s economy recover from “stagflation”? And, the “father of disruptive innovation” has died—the legacy of Clayton Christensen’s management lessons. Simon Long hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
America’s biggest banks posted record profits last week, despite falling interest rates. This week the attention turns to smaller lenders. Why might they not do so well? Also, why precious metals rhodium and palladium make gold look cheap. And, ganbei! The world’s biggest alcoholic-drinks company, finding success in doing everything… wrong. Simon Long hosts    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Boeing has a new chief executive. What does he need to do to restore faith in the world’s biggest aerospace company? Also, why some countries are trying to ditch the dollar and challenge America’s dominance of the global financial cycle. And, how can the economics profession solve its race problem? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.  ____________________ Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Oil and gold prices spiked after the killing of Qassem Suleimani, an Iranian general, by the United States. How might heightened tension in the Middle East affect these important commodity markets in the weeks ahead? And, at the American Economic Association’s annual meeting, Ben Bernanke reflected on how successfully the Fed has adapted to a world of ultra-low interest rates. Also, why consumer shame now means it pays to be ethical. Patrick Lane hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
The office is evolving beyond recognition. How did a functional grid of desks become more like a home, complete with in-house childcare and spare exercise clothes? James Fransham, a data journalist at The Economist, takes a tour of some of the world’s leading offices to find out whether other companies will follow their lead. Is it possible to leave work feeling better than when you arrived? And, when it comes to the bottom line, is the office of the future good for business?   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
From pickled radishes to red knickers, we take a break from the news of the moment to look back over the peaks and troughs of the past year in business, finance and economics. Our merry panel of Helen Joyce, The Economist’s finance editor, Patrick Foulis, our business affairs editor, and Schumpeter columnist Henry Tricks join Philip Coggan, otherwise known as Bartleby, for a riotous ride through the stories of the year. And, fortified with mulled wine and chocolate coins, they offer their predictions for 2020 Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Money talks: Maxed out

Money talks: Maxed out

2019-12-1719:43

Boeing has announced it will temporarily cease production of 737 Max airliners. How high are the stakes for the company? And Heather Boushey, executive director at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, says data on inequality should be making economists rethink their models. Also, The Economist’s Bartleby columnist on how to survive the office Christmas party. Simon Long hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
How are markets pricing the various possible outcomes of the British election? And, central banks are starting to incorporate climate risk into their forecasts, but some wonder whether they are over-reaching. Also, the nuts of wrath—a tale of Italian Nutella. Helen Joyce hosts.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Donald Trump is introducing new tariffs and this time they are not aimed at China. The latest figures suggest that China’s economy is stronger than Mr Trump portrays. What valuation will the Saudi Aramco IPO achieve? Also, economist and author Branko Milanović on the battle between liberal capitalism and political capitalism. Patrick Lane hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
LVMH, a French luxury goods giant, is buying American jeweller Tiffany & Co for over $16bn. What are its plans for the latest jewel in its crown? Soumaya Keynes speaks to Stephen Vaughn, former general counsel to the United States Trade Representative, about a crisis at the heart of the World Trade Organisation. And, what lessons can be learned from the world’s most extreme economies? Patrick Lane hosts ___________________  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, go to www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Comments (7)

Nuage Laboratoire

text

Mar 6th
Reply

Jarrod Newell

the economist was once a place of solid objective news. It has now become agenda driven PC propaganda. So sad to be dropping this once great publication.

Jul 5th
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Manoj Kumar

good one.

May 11th
Reply

Mykola Dimura

The economist's podcasts never work on my Android. If I try downloading them - get "Download failed" error. Playing directly does not work either.

Jul 25th
Reply (1)

ishan

The host needs to speak slowly. She's great in fluency but extremely fast. I have had to replay the audio several times to understand what was stated. especially when these were facts

Jul 24th
Reply (1)

Vimal Vimal

Vimalmakwana8765@gmail.com

Jan 31st
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