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Money Talks from Economist Radio
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Money Talks from Economist Radio

Author: The Economist

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Our editors and correspondents give their authoritative take on the markets, the economy and the world of business. Published every Tuesday on Economist Radio.

273 Episodes
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Relations between America and China are at a fresh low. What do Donald Trump’s latest threats mean for Chinese businesses? Also, the coronavirus has had a disastrous effect on Saudi Aramco’s earnings. How can the state-controlled oil company weather the extreme conditions? And, the bumps ahead for America’s $800bn trucking industry. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The global pandemic has hit American companies hard, reflected in the latest earnings season, and it could be many quarters before a return to profitability. In Europe, Germany is used to being an economic powerhouse, but the virus has left it in a slump. And, could central banks ditch cash in favour of virtual money? Simon Long hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In response to the covid-19 pandemic governments have pumped huge amounts of cash into economies and the role of central banks is changing dramatically. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Henry Curr, The Economist's economics editor, whether this heralds a new era of macroeconomics. Economists Ken Rogoff and Claudia Sahm look at what else policymakers can do—should interest rates go negative? And, banking in the shadows. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
TikTok, a video-sharing app, is caught up in the US-China clash. Can the firm restructure itself to address concerns over privacy and security? Also, why the pandemic has meant some households are awash with cash. And, a question of judgment. Patrick Lane hosts    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Money Talks: No Huawei

Money Talks: No Huawei

2020-07-1424:19

Britain has announced plans to ban Huawei from its 5G networks over security concerns, following pressure from America. How will this change the way Chinese tech firms operate in the West? The row is one sign relations between America and China are going from bad to worse; what does that mean for their trade agreement? And, is a slow bull emerging in China's stockmarkets? Simon Long hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
As some lockdown measures lift, governments hope they can get their economies back on track. Which will have the strongest recovery? Also, meal-delivery wars heat up as Uber gobbles up rival Postmates in an all-stock deal worth over $2.6bn. And, the importance of building a more resilient food-supply chain. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer ____________________  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Companies including Unilever, Coca-Cola and Verizon are pulling their ads from Facebook because of its content-moderation policies. Does this spell trouble for the social-media giant? Also, why investors’ love of commercial property is being tested. And, e-sports v traditional sports. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The coronavirus has turned Amazon into one of the world’s essential firms. But while proving the company’s strengths, the pandemic-fuelled digital surge has also revealed its vulnerabilities. Tamzin Booth, The Economist’s technology and business editor, talks to insiders, critics and the competition, to find out whether Amazon can carry on dominating e-commerce and triumph in the coming cloud wars.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The killing of George Floyd and ensuing protests are a wake-up call for corporate America. There are few African-Americans among its CEOs. What will bosses do to combat racism beyond releasing PR statements? Also, how diversity helps the bottom line and the history of economic suppression of African-Americans. Patrick Lane hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
American unemployment fell in May, but is this really a sign of a "rocket-ship" recovery? Also, Gene Sperling, a former director of the National Economic Council, lays out his vision for a more equitable society. And, thriving on secrecy—the private fund behind well-known brands. Simon Long hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
China and America are clashing over Hong Kong. Can the multi-trillion-dollar financial centre survive the fall out? Also, property developer Hamid Moghadam explains why the rise of e-commerce has made warehouses hot property. And the lockdown has led to a bicycle boom—will it last? Patrick Lane hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery?     For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
America and Europe face a wave of corporate bankruptcies as a result of covid-19. But will some businesses be able to restructure rather than go broke? Also, why some are calling for the Federal Reserve to turn to negative interest rates to alleviate the slump. And, is now the time for entrepreneurial true grit? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The global food network has so far weathered the challenge of covid-19 and largely kept shelves and plates full. As the pandemic continues, more people are at risk of going hungry. But unlike past crises, the problem this time will not be supply. Rachana Shanbhogue and Matthieu Favas trace an $8trn food chain back from fork to farm to investigate the weak links. Can governments hold their nerve and resist protectionism? And could the crisis reveal an opportunity for a greener food future? Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Germany’s constitutional court has given the European Central Bank an ultimatum. The ruling could prompt further challenges to both the EU’s economic recovery plan and the authority of its highest court. The pandemic is a moment of reckoning for America’s health-care industry; but could patients ultimately benefit? And host Patrick Lane gets a glimpse of the—contactless—office of the future. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Money Talks: Peak car?

Money Talks: Peak car?

2020-04-2826:353

Lockdowns worldwide have brought the automobile industry to a standstill. Hakan Samuelsson, the CEO of Volvo, explains why the solution to the crisis will not be as simple as getting factories moving again. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Simon Wright, industry editor, and Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor, whether carmakers can still afford to invest in the cutting-edge technologies that could transport them to a greener, safer future. Has the world passed peak car? Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Hedge funds are usually seen as the risk-takers of the financial world, but how have they been performing in these times of economic turmoil? And, why the coronavirus pandemic could lead to the deaths of millions of small businesses. Plus, the problem of moral hazard—could government bail-outs have unintended consequences? Patrick Lane hosts  You can read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. Please subscribe for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
With countries accounting for more than half of global GDP in lockdown, the collapse of commercial activity is unprecedented. Falling demand and a bitter price war had pushed the price of crude oil to its lowest since 1999. Could a historic deal between oil producers be enough to stabilise the market? Plus, those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will have to adapt to a very different environment. And, how to reopen factories after covid-19. Patrick Lane hosts  For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.   And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts  For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.   And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
At the beginning of a financial year like no other, millions of newly furloughed or unemployed Americans face rent and mortgage payments. How long can the financial system withstand the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic? Many employees have had to make a quick transition to remote working. Businesses struggling to make the switch could look to those companies that have never had an office. And, a day in the life of Bartleby—and his cat. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (14)

Rob Heldt

cc number w,.b bc. hi. hi

Aug 1st
Reply

Stu Cook

This is certainly an informative podcast on the whole Huawei situation. Amidst trade talks with China that are either breaking down or not depending on whose perspective you get on it, one cannot help wonder if people are trying to create an enemy out of China just as they have been so fond of doing towards Russia for some time now.

Jul 21st
Reply

Paul Billington

This was interesting but the speaker repeatedly mistakes corroboration with causation. For example, he skates over patent filings in relation to emancipation, as thought the only issue at work is black politics.

Jul 4th
Reply

ADA Y

Why he sounds like a robot?

May 1st
Reply

samadler

Sorry but sometimes when guests whose native language isn’t English & esp if they speak painfully slow with that heavy accent one just loses the interest...

Apr 30th
Reply

Donna Morris

best column at the end. I laughed til I cried. thank you for that

Apr 9th
Reply

Cs Krynya

Hi, just a thought regarding the milk farming industry. I think there is another significant reason why the demands for cow milk is decreasing is these videos what under covered reporters released to the world where it clearly seen how they cows are treated, so disgusting, inhuman, cruel!!! After seeing these videos people think about why the hell should I support this industry by buying there products??? The older generation like these senators stand next to this industry but this is not the future! Young generation prefers to drink alternative milks and even if the government saves this industry that is just temporary.

Apr 8th
Reply

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Mar 6th
Reply

Jarrod Newell

the economist was once a place of solid objective news. It has now become agenda driven PC propaganda. So sad to be dropping this once great publication.

Jul 5th
Reply

Manoj Kumar

good one.

May 11th
Reply

Mykola Dimura

The economist's podcasts never work on my Android. If I try downloading them - get "Download failed" error. Playing directly does not work either.

Jul 25th
Reply (1)

ishan

The host needs to speak slowly. She's great in fluency but extremely fast. I have had to replay the audio several times to understand what was stated. especially when these were facts

Jul 24th
Reply (1)

Vimal Vimal

Vimalmakwana8765@gmail.com

Jan 31st
Reply
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