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Most Notorious! A True Crime History Podcast
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Most Notorious! A True Crime History Podcast

Author: Blue Ewe Media

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Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals and tragedies throughout history. Host Erik Rivenes interviews authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and the stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
120 Episodes
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In June of 1968, a wealthy Detroit-area family was gunned down in their northern Michigan cabin. It would become one of the most famous cold cases in the state's history. Mardi Link, author of "When Evil Came to Good Hart", shares the tragic story of the Robison family, and the police suspect who was never convicted but almost certainly committed the terrible crime. 
In 1385, a  bitter feud between two French courtesans came to a terrible head when Marguerite, the beautiful young wife of Norman knight Jean de Carrouges, accuses her husband's enemy, Jacques LeGris, of raping her while she has been left alone. After a long legal fight, Parliament finally determines that God will produce the verdict. A judicial duel to the death will decide the outcome. And the risk is great. If Carroughes is killed, Marguerite will also die. My guest is Eric Jager, professor of medieval literature at UCLA. He summarizes the story documented so thrillingly in his book, The Last Duel: A True Story of Crime, Scandal, and Trial by Combat in Medieval France. 
Paul Andrew Hutton, best-selling author of The Apache Wars: The Hunt For Geronimo, The Apache Kid, And The Captive Boy Who Started The Longest War In American History, is my guest on this episode of Most Notorious. He tells the story of a mixed-blood warrior and Apache scout named Mickey Free, whose capture as a boy is considered the catalyst for the Apaches Wars. They were wars that spanned over two decades in the American Southwest, and led by famed Apache leaders like Geronimo, Cochise and  Mangas Coloradas. The Apache Wars also gave birth to one of the most famous outlaws of the era, the notorious "Apache Kid". 
Most of us have grown up thinking that Elliot Ness and his famed "Untouchables" were the crimefighters who brought down the notorious Al Capone in Chicago. But instead, it was a group of millionaire businessmen called the "Secret Six" who were the real reason for the Capone Outfit's demise. In his book "Al Capone and the 1933 World's Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago", my guest, William Hazelgrove, makes the argument that in order for the city to successfully host their second World's Fair, they had to take out Al Capone first.
In 1974, a young woman named Alice killed her abusive husband. Then she met and married a man named Gerald Uden, who was having financial issues with his ex-wife, Virginia Martin. Not long after, Gerald would murder Virginia and her two sons, Richard and Reagan, and hide their bodies in the vast Wyoming wilderness. Best selling author Ron Franscell is my guest, and he talks about his research into 40 year old murder investigation, along with his beliefs about Gerald Uden as a sociopathic murderer.  His book is called "Alice and Gerald: A Homicidal Love Story". 
On January 10th, 1883, the famed Newhall House hotel in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, caught fire. Made worse by a series of blunders by hotel staff and a poorly trained and equipped fire department, seventy five people would ultimately lose their lives in the horrific, raging inferno. My guest, historian Matthew J. Prigge,  is author of “Damn the Old Tinderbox! Milwaukee’s Palace of the West and the Fire That Defined An Era”. He tells the harrowing stories of the guests and the staff who both perished and escaped from one of the most devastating hotel fires in American history, and the man who would eventually be arrested and tried for setting the blaze. 
In part two of this episode, John Boessenecker continues his tale of Frank Hamer, including his days as a Prohibition agent in the 1920s, a cold-case investigator, and his famous hunt of notorious Depression-era outlaws and murderers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. John Boessenecker is the New York Times bestselling author of  Texas Ranger: The Epic Life of Frank Hamer, the Man Who Killed Bonnie and Clyde. 
My guest is John Boessenecker, former police officer and New York Times bestselling author of Texas Ranger: The Epic Life of Frank Hamer, the Man Who Killed Bonnie and Clyde. In this first part of the episode, he talks about Hamer's wild and bloody career in Texas law enforcement  from 1906 until 1920, and makes the case that Hamer was the greatest American lawman of the twentieth century. 
On December 6th, 1969, The Rolling Stones headlined a free concert at Altamont Speedway outside of San Francisco. It quickly turned ugly, culminating with the stabbing death of eighteen-year-old Meredith Hunter by a member of the Hell's Angels, who were acting as security. My guest, Joel Selvin, long-time music critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and New York Times bestselling author, explains how the concert came into being and offers details on the terrible night, including his thoughts on whether Mick Jagger and the Stones  were really aware of the extent of the violence during their set.  Joel Selvin's book is called The Rolling Stones, the Hells Angels, and the Inside Story of Rock's Darkest Day.
In June of 1906, famed architect Stanford White was murdered by an obsessive millionaire's son named Harry Thaw at the roof garden theater of Madison Square Garden. His attorneys would claim in the sensational court case that followed that he'd done it because his young wife, model Evelyn Nesbit, had been raped by White when she was only sixteen. My guest is award-winning historian and author Simon Baatz, and his book is called The Girl on the Velvet Swing: Sex Murder and Madness at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century.  He joins me to tell the dramatic story. 
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Comments (18)

Robert Stanley

hard to follow if you're dumb , otherwise s good true story..

May 18th
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Viva La Vida

This expert finishes each sentence with a question mark. So difficult to listen to.

May 16th
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Sharon Anderson

this is supposed to be 10 Most Notorous Historical Ghosts with Diane Student, but it the Jamws/Younger bank robbery podcast

Apr 23rd
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Jaymes Moynihan

love how she has to explain what a cricket bat is...for all those millions of Americans who, if it's not in America would have no idea what it is.

Apr 17th
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Mary LaMarca

Likewise he spends the introduction babbling about nonsense. Hard to follow.

Apr 15th
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jakfuk

boring babbling bullahit

Apr 14th
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Jaymes Moynihan

interesting story but that author is hard to listen to , that upward inflection in his voice is super annoying

Apr 3rd
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Ishmael

Leonsku was a weak coward. Glad he got put to death.

Feb 27th
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Ashley McKerall

episode 6 btw... the Jesse POMerOY EpiSODE...

Feb 21st
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Ashley McKerall

I can't listen to thIS, because of the rISING, of every 4th wORD, that this guy SAYS, and it's very disTRACTING, and I just can't foLLOW...

Feb 21st
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Ishmael

I can't wait to see "I am the Night" tomorrow!

Jan 28th
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corp Azilum

I love some of the metaphors this guy uses.

Jan 26th
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Professional Model

There's money in murder.

Jan 23rd
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Jaymes Moynihan

everybody and their auntie has a theory on the Black Dahlia case, love his show but I'm gunna have to miss this episode, I can't stomach ANOTHER theory in one of these historical cold cases, everybody thinks their THEORY is the real one and their usually held together by circumstantial evidence at best. I don't understand why some of these authors have to keep beating a dead horse by writing the 100th book on the subject and then try to push an idea that was never mentioned in the other 99 books on the subject, lol..

Jan 22nd
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corp Azilum

Jaymes Moynihan Yeah, but if I remember right the one in this book was the best idea the police had too.

Jan 24th
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Stephen Hemmings

absolutely fascinating story with an incredible (if homicidal!) character at the centre of things. You could not make this stuff up! Well done to all involved in this production. Most Notorious is always a great listen.

Jan 15th
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Stephen Hemmings

Another great podcast. Thanks for your work.

Jan 2nd
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Stephen Hemmings

Great production. Very well presented and well informed. Very listenable. Well done!

Jan 2nd
Reply
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