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Name 3 Songs

Name 3 Songs

Author: W!ZARD Studios

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Name 3 Songs was created to challenge sexism in the music industry and empower fangirls. Every Sunday, join us as we think critically and unlearn internalized misogyny together.


Co-hosts Sara Feigin and Jenna Million are long-time fangirls with 10+ years of music industry experience.


For detailed show notes on each episodes visit: name3songs.com


This is a music commentary podcast based on in-depth research and the personal opinions of the hosts.

59 Episodes
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The rise of the internet in the early 2000s ushered in a new era of pop stars – one where teen girls like Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera were suddenly available for mass consumption and subject to the omnipresent male gaze. This gave way to pressures for female stars to walk the fine line between virgin and whore. And all the while, the world was watching, waiting for the day they turned from girls to women and stepped into their sexuality.  By 19, Britney fully embraced her sexual identity in “I’m a Slave 4 U '' and subsequent album Britney; meanwhile, Christina, 21, did the same with “Dirrty” and Stripped. After the album cycles, they both stepped back from the overtly sexual images, leaving us to wonder if it all had to do with the pressure to become the sexual being that society was waiting for them to be. In this episode, we explore the narratives given to Britney and Xtina, and look at how others like Miley Cyrus, Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande, Dua Lipa and Billie Eilish dealt with the pressure to be sexual pop stars.  Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Check out all the sources for this episode at name3song.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Why does the music industry insist on relegating female musicians into this mythical “women in rock” genre? Instead of continuing to ask women the tired question “what’s it like to be a woman in music?” why don’t we start asking men “what’s it like to benefit from male privilege in music?”. In this episode, we’re joined by She Will Rock You podcast to look back at the women who have defined rock music and how they’ve been treated – from Heart being called incestual lovers to Phoebe Bridgers being criticized for smashing her guitar on SNL.  For more rock music stories like these, check out She Will Rock You on all podcast platforms. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Check out all the sources for this episode at name3song.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
As much as everyone loves Dolly Parton’s honey-sweet vocals and big hair, country music has a diversity problem – and not just the lack of women, but the even greater lack of people of color and queer folks.  This week we’re breaking it all down to understand how country music has come to represent such a deep divide of American diversity. From The Chicks and Marren Morris to Kacey Musgraves and Mickey Guyton, we’re taking a closer look at the women who are knocking down doors to create a more diverse space. And we couldn’t do it without a true expert – Madeleine Molly, gender studies scholar at the London School of Economics and country music host at W!ZARD Radio. You can join Madeleine Molly every Sunday at 4pm GMT on W!ZARD Radio for more conversations like this one. And you can support black women in country music at the funds here and here! Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Check out all the sources for this episode at name3song.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
When the music industry tries to put you in a box, what do you do? For Fefe Dobson, “Brandy Spears'' was the box industry executives tried to force her into. Referring to a black girl like Brandy with a pop voice like Britney, Dobson knew she would never be successful playing a role that wasn’t true to herself. Instead, she made her mark in music history with her 2003 rock-infused debut album at the age of 18. In this week’s episode of Name 3 Songs, we sit down with Dobson herself to hear about the challenges she faced over the years in an industry that didn’t know how to handle her. Despite the ups and downs, Dobson remains clear in her passion for creating authentic music. In our exclusive interview, she tells us about the importance of empowering women in music and lets us in on some of the many “blessings” she received over the years like seeing Miley Cyrus perform her song “Start All Over.”  Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Learn more about the sources referenced in this episode at name3songs.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
There comes a time when every teen boy bander or male popstar turns from innocent heartthrob to promiscuous adult — and they make a whole album to let you know about it.  This phenomenon all started when Justin Timberlake traded the N*SYNC’s teen pop bangers for the sensual R&B tunes on his debut solo record Justified (2002) – ultimately distancing himself from the fangirl stigma to be taken seriously by an older, male demographic.  After Timberlake, this phenomenon was repeated by others like Jesse McCartney, Nick Jonas, Justin Bieber, Zayn Malik, and Liam Payne. We’re ranking each of their transitions from the cringiest of bad boy rebrandings to the suavest.  Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Learn more about the sources referenced in this episode at name3songs.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Did you know that it’s scientifically proven that creative individuals are more likely to stray from gender norms of masculinity and femininity? From David Bowie and Prince to Jaden and Harry Styles, some of the biggest musicians in history have challenged masculinity by leaning into the feminine. Whether these choices were an expression of their gender identity or strictly a means of sticking it to the man, it pushed the boundaries on societal norms, and in doing so, moved the conversation forward on gender fluidity. In this episode, we break down this history to understand how gender expression has evolved and what we can learn from expressing our true selves. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Learn more about the sources referenced in this episode at name3songs.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Remember when Tramp Stamps made that song saying they’d rather die than sleep with another straight white guy? It’s like they thought they were being progressive while singing about sexuality, but it really missed the mark. Throughout music history we’ve seen artists using music to express their sexuality. But just like misogyny is ingrained in us, so is the male gaze and the fetishization of lesbian and bi women that come along with it. (A la Liam Payne’s “Both Ways” or Katy Perry’s “I Kissed A Girl.”) This week, we’re joined by musician + content creator Joseph Dubay (aka emojoseph on TikTok) to break down the way we think about sexuality in music, and whether or not artists should be open about their sexuality. (Hint: no one owes you anything!) Find Joseph on all the platforms for more! Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Check out all the sources for this episode at name3song.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TW: drug use, overdosing and suicide Has your favorite celebrity ever done something that shocked you? Like finding out Harry Styles does juice cleanses, or that Taylor Swift seemingly dyed her hair the colors of the bisexual flag for a music video. Maybe your fave did something that doesn’t sit right with you on a moral level, like Justin Bieber having dreads or Demi Lovato glorifying substance abuse.  These shocks or disappointments happen when a celebrity fails to meet our expectations of them. In this episode we explore the line between expectations and reality – between projected morals and real actions – and when it’s warranted to hold your idol accountable. Because at the end of the day accountability is more important than canceling so that we can all learn and grow from our mistakes.  You can learn more about parasocial relationships in our previous episode When Idolization Goes Too Far. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Find all of the sources for this episode at name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Olivia Rodrigo just became the youngest artist to start a career with her first three singles in the top 10 on the Hot 100 chart, according to Billboard. But not many people know that she’s one of Disney Channel’s brightest stars – appearing in High School Musical: The Musical: The Series.  Which makes us wonder if Olivia learned from the careers of her predecessors – Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato and Selena Gomez all starred on Disney Channel, launched their music careers with Hollywood Records, and all burned out to various degrees ranging from shocking public stunts to eating disorders and mental illness. All of this leads us to wonder, why did this happen? How can we protect Olivia Rodrigo from the same fate? And where is Disney’s responsibility in all of this? Listen to the full episode to find out! Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Find all of the sources for this episode at name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
How does TikTok and a juice cleanse lead to a war over a fat woman’s body? A heated debate broke out last December over Lizzo’s juice cleanse, with members of the body positive and fat liberation communities sharing their outrage.  Lizzo is a fat, black woman. By simply existing, Lizzo inherently challenges the norms of the music industry, and like Mama Cass, Adele, and Kanye West, everyone has an opinion on her fat body. This week, we’re breaking down fatphobia in the music industry by learning about the radical and political differences between the fat acceptance, body positivity and fat liberation movements over the decades. And, we’re joined by writer Patricia DeLuca who’s been fighting anti-fat bias in the music industry since the 90s, and started her own website Strutter to call out fatphobia in pop culture. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Head to Name3Songs.com for a full list of sources referenced in this episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TW: brief mentions of suicide and overdosing Little Mix just made history as the first female group to win Best British Group at the 2021 Brit Awards, and they used their acceptance speech to call out white male dominance, sexism, and lack of diversity in the music industry. With over 60 million records sold in their 10-year career, what leads the biggest girl group in the world to call out these injustices? In this episode, we discuss the highs and lows of Little Mix’s career including being cyber-bullied, fat-shamed, and slut-shamed, which ultimately led them to advocate for women’s empowerment and speak out on other issues like racism and colourism. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Learn more about the sources referenced in the episode in the show notes found at name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The music industry is no stranger to long work hours, underpay, and white- and male-dominated spaces that lead to power imbalances, sexual harassment and so much more that leaves us feeling overworked and undervalued. In short – it’s toxic.  What is it that makes the music industry such a toxic work environment? And how can we as individuals combat these scenarios? This week we’re joined by LJ Malberg, compassion-based business coach and founder of CoMuse, to give us some insight into how we can empower ourselves to navigate toxic workplaces.  Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and sources listed at Name3Songs.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Have you ever noticed how rock history tends to be filled with white men? You know, the likes of Elvis Presley aka “The King of Rock n Roll,” The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and on and on. But what if we told you this was only half of the story? The truth is, these men drew inspiration from the vocal styles and dance moves of African American women like Big Mama Thornton, The Shirelles, and Tina Turner, among others. These stories are often written out of the rock n roll history textbooks, leaving out entire generations of hard work from African American women who pioneered the genre.  This week, we dive into Black Diamond Queens: African American Women in Rock n Roll by Maureen Mahon to gain a better picture of the legendary musicians who laid the groundwork for music as we know it today. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal!  Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and sources listed at Name3Songs.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Why are industry plants and why is everyone suddenly talking about them? This week we discuss what defines an industry plant and how the term came about in music history. We also unpack what is happening with female pop-punk trio Tramp Stamps and where the band went wrong. Plus, we examine other artists such as Lana Del Rey, Billie Eilish, and The Runaways to see how they compare under the industry plant label. And we’re joined by Culture Writer Amanda Silberling! Find her on @asilwrites for more or listen to her podcast Wow If True, about what it’s like to go viral online. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and sources listed at Name3Songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Over 15 years and 11 Grammy wins, Swift has received criticism for writing silly love songs for girls, for dating too many men, for writing songs about her exes, for allegedly being a “snake” (thanks Kanye & Kim). The hate never ends! In this episode, we’re joined by long-time Swifities Soph, Lizzy and Joss to discuss how Swift squashed the criticism with her sixth album Reputation (2017). After a year of silence from Swift, she dropped Reputation’s lead single “Look What You Made Me Do” – a scathing middle finger to the music industry and the media filled with snakes, vaults of money and 15 different Taylor Swifts from various eras. Reputation was the moment Swift stopped caring what the media said about her, stepping into the most authentic version of herself. With the release of Folklore and Evermore in 2020, Swift has finally gained the approval of the media (and took home a Grammy for Album of the Year along the way). But with her turbulent history, how long will the media love Swift? Big thanks to our guests! If you want to talk more, you can find them at the following: Soph (@sophjonesmusic + Download Your Thoughts Pod), Lizzy (@lizzyzyburt + @fairviewofficial), and Joss (@josbrago). Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and sources listed at Name3Songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Taylor Swift is on the top of everyone's minds lately. In July 2020, Swift released her eighth studio album Folklore, followed by a second surprise album only five months later titled Evermore. At the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards, Swift won Album of the Year for Folklore, written during quarantine and produced virtually by Aaron Dessner and Jack Antonoff. These are only a few of her recent victories in her 15+ year career. But it hasn’t been an easy journey for the Nashville country-singer-turned-pop-star. Throughout her career, Swift has had a tumultuous relationship with the media, spurred on by Kayne West and her propensity for writing songs about her long list of ex-lovers (Joe Jonas, John Mayer, Harry Styles, Calvin Harris to name a few.) At the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards, Kanye infamously stole the mic from her onstage while accepting Best Female Video for “You Belong With Me.” That moment rocketed Taylor Swift from rising star to a household name, and ever since, the media has criticized Swift for playing a victim. In this episode, we examine the major events in her career and how the media has reported on them to answer the question: Is Taylor Swift really a victim? Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and facts cited at Name3Songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Previously on Name 3 Songs, we learned about the importance of mental health within the music community and how toxic masculinity plays contributes to the stigma surrounding mental health. Today, we’re talking with three special guests – Ernesto, Michaela and Katie – to hear their perspectives as fans! We explore questions like: Do musicians have to be mental health advocates? When should a musician speak out about their mental health? How do the next generation of musicians create a safer space for fans to get mental health help? Big thanks to our guests! If you want to talk more, you can find them at the following: Ernesto (@lost.withyou), Katie Kane from SecretFangirls.com (@katie_kane + @therealkatiekane), and Michaela @coldcoffeecry + @michaelasteele97. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million Get Mental Health Help Resources and more information at Name3Songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
How far is too far when it comes to celebrity idolization? Idolization, aka parasocial relationships, are those ongoing, one-sided bonds with media figures. (Sound familiar?!) So, are parasocial relationships normal? We dive into psychology to find out! We look at why we admire celebrities and the different idolization levels on the Celebrity Attitude Scale. Then, Sara takes us True Crime! We discuss extreme examples that lead to stalking (Brendon Urie, Katy Perry, Justin Beiber – to name just a few!) and even the deaths of John Lennon and Selena Quintanilla. It’s a wild rollercoaster from start to finish when idolization goes too far. Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and facts cited at Name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
If you thought Justin Timberlake ruining Janet Jackson’s or Britney Spears’ career was bad, just wait till you hear this! Sadly, men taking advantage of young pop stars is a repeating theme throughout pop culture history – Phil and Ronnie Spector, Mariah Carey and Tommy Mottola, Mandy Moore and Ryan Adams. We’re joined by pop culture expert Troy McEady from Dunzo Podcast to take a closer look at the men who have exploited pop stars in their relationships. From glass coffins to security cameras to revenge music videos, it’s a wild ride! Find more from Dunzo: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Instagram | Patreon Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and facts cited at name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
We’re talking about our favorite subject – boy bands! Throughout history, boy bands have been a massively lucrative enterprise for the music industry, thanks to their main demographic of teen girls. Heartthrob boy bands + adoring fangirls = big money! And this is where things get shady. Behind every successful boy band is a man with industry know-how (and sometimes even nefarious intentions.) We’re joined by Maria Sherman, author of Larger Than Life: A History of Boy Bands, to explore the dark history of boy bands and the men who pull the strings – from Maurice Starr’s shady contracts with New Kids on the Block and New Edition to Lou Perarlamn using Backstreet Boys and Nsync as the front of a Ponzi scheme. We also discuss their impact on pop culture which led to the rise of One Direction (thanks to Simon Cowell) and BTS (a la Big Hit Entertainment.) All of this to say, are boy bands inherently sexist? And at the end of the day, do we even care? Find Maria Sherman on Twitter and Instagram for fun boy band knowledge more! This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and facts cited at name3songs.com. If you’d like to discuss anything we talked about today in greater detail with us, you can find us on Twitter @Name3Songs or @sara_feigin & @jenna_million. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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