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New Books in Psychology

Author: Marshall Poe

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Interviews with Psychologists about their New Books
256 Episodes
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Relationships are hard, and it’s often because we defend ourselves against the very intimacy we seek by getting locked into problematic patterns of compulsive caretaking. Such was the topic of Mark Borg, Grant Brenner, and Daniel Berry’s first book, Irrelationship: How We Use Dysfunctional Relationships to Hide from Intimacy. These authors explain how to break out of such problematic patterns in their follow-up book, Relationship Sanity: Creating and Maintaining Healthy Relationships (Central Recovery Press, 2018). In our interview, Mark Borg and Daniel Berry break down how partners who have lost touch with each other can find themselves again and establish new, more authentic ways of connecting and being honest with one another. In their book as well as our discussion, they explain complex concepts in refreshingly plain language so that anyone can put their concepts into practice starting now. This interview will be of interest to those looking to improve their relationships and reconnect with their partners, as well as mental health professionals working with couples looking to find each other again.Mark Borg, Jr. is a licensed psychologist and psychoanalyst in New York City who has developed theories and implementation strategies for community crisis intervention. His writings on community intervention, organizational consultation, and application of psychoanalytic theory to community crisis intervention have been published in various journals and collected work, and he has presented papers on his theories at academic conferences in the United States, Canada, Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Italy, Greece, Turkey, South Africa, Chile, and Israel.Daniel Berry is a Registered Nurse in New York City with background in inpatient, home care, and community settings. He currently serves as Assistant Director of Nursing for Risk Management at a public facility serving homeless and undocumented victims of street violence, addiction, and traumatic injuries. In 2015, he was invited to serve as a nurse consultant to a United Nations-certified NGO in Afghanistan promoting community development and addressing women’s and children’s health issues.Eugenio Duarte, Ph.D. is a psychologist and psychoanalyst practicing in Miami. He treats individuals and couples, with specialties in gender and sexuality, eating and body image problems, and relationship issues. He is also a university psychologist at Florida International University’s Counseling and Psychological Services Center, where he coordinates the eating disorders service. He is a graduate and faculty of William Alanson White Institute and former chair of their LGBTQ Study Group. He is also a contributing author to the book Introduction to Contemporary Psychoanalysis: Defining Terms and Building Bridges(Routledge, 2018).Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Psychedelics are not terribly new. And the drug mescaline is certainly not new. Mike Jay's new book, Mescaline: A Global History of the First Psychedelic (Yale University Press, 2019), tells two trippy stories: one that is about Indigenous use and another about Western society's adoption of the drug in culture and medicine. He discusses perceptions of mescaline in science, culture, and the psychedelic renaissance. The book - and the discussion - is eye-opening.Mike Jay is a freelance writer and public intellectual. He is the author of over a dozen books and regularly contributes to the the London Review of Books, the Wall Street Journal and the Literary Review. He works as a curator and exhibit designer for the Wellcome Trust in London.Lucas Richert is an associate professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He studies intoxicating substances and the pharmaceutical industry. He also examines the history of mental health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Are we in the midst of a psychedelic renaissance? If so, what can we learn about the present moment through the history of psychedelic experiments in the past? Matt Oram discusses contemporary debates about LSD and MDMA and brings much-needed context with his new book, The Trials of Psychedelic Therapy: LSD Psychotherapy in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018), Oram talks about the role of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry as well the field of drug regulation. He underlines, too, that the history of psychedelics is a lot more complicated than researchers have previously suggested.Lucas Richert is an associate professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He studies intoxicating substances and the pharmaceutical industry. He also examines the history of mental health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sometimes people are blameworthy or otherwise not admirable because of what they believe. And sometimes they are blameworthy or otherwise not admirable because of how they believe – broadly, their ways of thinking, inquiring, handling evidence, and managing information. We sometimes criticize others for being careless, dogmatic, gullible, and so on. These evaluations often have the form of appraisals of the persons to whom they are applied. So, just as we might speak of intellectual virtues, we can also speak of intellectual vices.In Vices of the Mind: From the Intellectual to the Political (Oxford University Press, 2019), Quassim Cassam develops a conception of epistemic vice, and explores the sites where specific vices of this kind appear. The result is a fascinating examination of the ways in which individuals’ flawed ways of thinking can impact the world.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Is love between man and woman the source of wisdom and the cornerstone of moral life? Naftali Rothenberg says it is, based on the works and life of the first century Jewish scholar and sage, Rabbi Akiva.In Rabbi Akiva’s Philosophy of Love (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) Rothenberg explores the philosophy of love through the thought and life of Rabbi Akiva whose life was transformed by the love of his wife, Rachel. From this starting point, Naftali Rothenberg conducts a thorough examination of the harmonious approach to love in the obstacle-laden context of human reality. Discussing the deterioration of passion into simple lust, the ability to contend with suffering and death, and so forth, Rothenberg addresses the deepest and most pressing questions about human love. The readings and observations offered here allow readers to acquire the wisdom of love—not merely as an assemblage of theoretical arguments and abstract statements, but as an analysis of the internal contradictions and difficulties revealed in the context of attempts to realize and implement harmonious love.Renee Garfinkel is a Jerusalem-based psychologist, writer, and television & radio commentator. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com or tweet Renee Garfinkel@embracingwisdomLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Over the past forty years, U.S. prisons and jails have used various psychotropic drugs. In this interview, Anthony Ryan Hatch discusses the need to think deeply about mass incarceration, pharmaceuticals, and psychiatry. He talks about the role of pharmacies and drug experiments in prison settings, and he underlines the ways that institutions themselves can be addicted to drugs. These are just a few of the topics that he examines in his recent book, Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America(University of Minnesota Press, 2019). And, importantly, he also offers thoughts about recovery from this addiction.Lucas Richert is an associate professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He studies intoxicating substances and the pharmaceutical industry. He also examines the history of mental health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
ABC News anchor Dan Harris used to think that meditation was for people who collect crystals, play Ultimate Frisbee, and use the word “namaste” without irony. After he had a panic attack on live television, he went on a strange and circuitous journey that ultimately led him to become one of meditation’s most vocal public proponents. Harris found that meditation made him more focused and less yanked around by his emotions. According to his wife, it also made him less annoying. Science suggests that the practice can lower your blood pressure, mitigate depression and anxiety, and literally rewire key parts of the brain. So what’s holding you back?In their new book, Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics: A 10% Happier How-to Book (Spielgel and Grau, 2017), authors Jeff Warren, Dan Harris, and Carlye Adler, offer an irreverent exploration of the how’s and why’s of meditation. They translate the science and practice of meditation with wisdom, wit, and by revealing their own personal challenges. They tackle the myths, misconceptions, and self-deceptions that keep people from meditating, and offer game-changing and deeply practical meditation instructions.Dr. Yael Schonbrun is a clinical psychologist in private practice, an assistant professor at Brown University, and a co-host of the podcast Psychologists Off The Clock.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
How does perception result in thoughts about items in the world (such as dogs or flowers) and in conscious states of many kinds (such as experiences of seeing red)? How does perception provide evidence for our beliefs (such as the belief that there is a red rose in front of you)?In The Unity of Perception: Content, Consciousness, and Evidence (Oxford University Press, 2018), Susanna Schellenberg considers these questions about the role of perception in mind and knowledge. Schellenberg, who is professor of philosophy and cognitive science at Rutgers University, offers a unified account of perception as the capacity to discriminate and single out particulars, and defends the answers that “capacitism” provides to such questions as the relation between perception and consciousness and the way in which hallucinators and perceivers share some types of evidence for their beliefs but differ importantly in others.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nowadays it seems that even high-performing kids are acutely stressed and lacking motivation. Many feel that they have no control over their own lives. Some stumble in high school, or hit college and unravel. As parents, we can only drive our kids so far; at some point, they will have to take the wheel and map out their own path. The Self-Driven Child (Penguin, 2019) written by Dr. William Stixrud, a clinical neuropsychologist, and Ned Johnson, a motivational coach who runs an elite tutoring service, offers a combination of cutting-edge brain science, the latest discoveries in behavioral therapy, and case studies drawn from the thousands of kids and teens. Together, Bill Stixrud and Ned Johnson discovered that the best antidote to stress is to give kids more of a sense of control over their lives. But this doesn't mean giving up your authority as a parent. In this groundbreaking book they reveal how you can actively help your child to sculpt a brain that is resilient, and ready to take on new challenges.In this interview, cross-posted from the podcast Psychologists Off The Clock, Dr. Diana Hill interviews Dr. Stixrud about how to support healthy development, self-motivation, and emotional resilience in our kids. They discuss more effective approaches to dealing with homework battles, technology use, and underage drinking.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A pivotal development in the history of psychology was the invention of family systems theory by psychiatrist Murray Bowen. He was among the first to observe families in a naturalistic setting, and his observations informed his ideas about families as ‘systems’ that functioned as ‘emotional units.’ Michael E. Kerr served as Dr. Bowen’s right-hand-man for many years, and he recently published a book showcasing the unique insights offered by family systems theory, entitled Bowen Theory’s Secrets: Revealing the Hidden Life of Families (Norton & Company, 2019). In our interview, Dr. Kerr discusses Murray Bowen’s journey from curious psychiatry resident to household name, and he explains with unique clarity and thoroughness some of the most revolutionary ideas from systems theory. This interview will interest anyone interested in better understanding how families function and the reciprocal influences between individuals and their families.Michael E. Kerr, M.D. is a psychiatrist who has specialized in the practice of Bowen theory-guided family therapy for over 45 years. He became Emeritus Director of the Bowen Center for the Study of the Family in 2011 after succeeding Murray Bowen ad directing the Center for 20 years. He is President of the Bowen Theory Academy in Islesboro, Maine.Eugenio Duarte, Ph.D. is a psychologist and psychoanalyst practicing in Miami. He treats individuals and couples, with specialties in gender and sexuality, eating and body image problems, and relationship issues. He is also a university psychologist at Florida International University’s Counseling and Psychological Services Center, where he coordinates the eating disorders service. He is a graduate and faculty of William Alanson White Institute and former chair of their LGBTQ Study Group. He is also a contributing author to the book Introduction to Contemporary Psychoanalysis: Defining Terms and Building Bridges (Routledge, 2018).Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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