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Newslaundry Conversations

Newslaundry Conversations

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A catalogue of all Newslaundry podcasts and shows that hadn't found a home of their own yet. NL vs NL, NL Interviews, NL Reports, and much more.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47 Episodes
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Ziya Us Salam is a journalist and author. Presently the associate editor of Frontline, he has been associated with the Hindu for over two decades. His latest book, Inside the Tablighi Jamaat, delves into the religious organisation accused by the governing establishment and the mainstream media of spreading “corona jihad” in India.In this conversation with Newslaundry’s Mehraj D Lone, Ziya begins by explaining the roots of the Jamaat, which is arguably India’s largest Muslim organisation. Its members were not intellectuals, he says, but poor, illiterate peasants who were barely able to recite a few verses from the Quran.Describing the Jamaat’s spiritual and ritualistic aspects, he says, “They never encourage youngsters, or senior members who come to them, to under the Quran.” In the context of his own experience with the organisation, Ziya says it rejected his proposal to distribute the meaning of the Quran in English, Hindi and Urdu, since the Jamaat focuses on reading the Quran to learn about the afterlife, he says, not to understand it.Will the recent backlash and allegations of “spreading Covid” change the Jamaat’s refusal to take a political stand? They live in a “social, political vacuum,” Ziya replies. “I don’t think they will change with Covid. They did not speak in 1992, they did not speak in 2002, they didn’t speak up in 2013. There is no likelihood that the Tablighi Jamaat will undergo any major change post Covid in 2020.”Watch. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Tired of loud frothy-mouth, potty-mouth debates on primetime TV? Tired of sad character-limited fights on Twitter where you don't really learn anything? We have something that might excite you. Newslaundry presents a new podcast: NL vs NL. Let's make debates great again!In this episode of NL vs NL, Newslaundry subscribers Dhruv Thakkar and Yash debate on whether traditional currency should be replaced by cryptocurrency. Yash thinks it should be, Dhruv disagrees.Listen and tell us who you agree or disagree with, and why. Write to us at contact@newslaundry.com, or reach out to Dhruv and Yash See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Nitin Pai is the director of the Takshashila Institution, an independent centre for research and education in public policy. In the episode of NL Conversations, he speaks with Meghnad S about policy, ideology and technology.Talking about “liberal nationalism”, he believes it can only exist in India, for elsewhere people will argue that it’s not possible to be “liberal” and “nationalist” at the same time. “Indian nationalism can work on a global scale because it does not insist on a single language, race and religion.”Nitin also discusses various ideologies and whether they make sense in today’s world. He complains that “we have become a society with no compassion” but maintains that the society is still “capable of looking after its weak”.Talking about India’s education system, he argued that it is important to think critically in today’s age of technology and complains that “the test system has killed education in this country.”Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Tired of loud frothy-mouth, potty-mouth debates on primetime TV? Tired of sad character-limited fights on Twitter where you don't really learn anything? We have something that might excite you. Newslaundry presents a new podcast: NL vs NL. Let's make debates great again!In this episode of NL vs NL, Chahak Gupta and Newslaundry subscriber Agastya Sreenivasan debate the uncomfortable question: is reservation desirable?Chahak says they are, Agastya disagrees.Listen and tell us who you agree or disagree with, and why. Write to us at contact@newslaundry.com, or reach out to Agastya and Chahak. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Check out Stop Press and susbcribe at https://stoppress.substack.com/In the latest episode of NL Conversations, Newslaundry’s Chitranshu Tewari speaks to Gautam Mishra, joining in from Melbourne. Gautam is the founder and chief executive officer of Inkl, a bundle news subscription platform that unlocks coverage from premium publishers like the New York Times and the Economist with a monthly subscription of just Rs 250. Talking about the upsurge in demand for bundle news subscriptions, Gautam speaks at length about the longevity and breadth of news in 2020. “Twenty years ago if you were from Delhi, it was fine for you to mostly concentrate on news from Delhi, but today you cannot do that,” he points out.He adds: “If you want to know what’s happening with Brexit, you would want to know it from the Brits. If you want to understand what’s happening in Hong Kong, you actually need to get it from the South China Morning Post.”Defending Facebook and Twitter on being unable to police “fake news”, Gautam says, “Facebook and Twitter are open networks and anytime you have an open network, that, by definition...means anybody can publish anything.” He says the Australian Competition Commission’s decision to make big tech pay directly to the publishers is “completely ridiculous and nonsense”. “When somebody has cancer, you can’t just cure it by giving a band-aid,” he says.Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this age of the internet, there’s little that doesn’t go viral. Including the news. But there’s some confusion as to what is meant by “viral news” and what constitutes “viral content”. More to the point, is there a difference between “news” and “content”? Or are they synonymous?To discuss the finer points of this question, Roli Pulse, the digital arm of Roli Books, in association with Newslaundry, brought together Sattvik Mishra, CEO of ScoopWhoop; Pragya Tiwari, journalist and policy consultant; Andre Borges, content creator at Pocket Aces; and Abhinandan Sekhri, co-founder of Newslaundry. “I think news has largely been dictated by a bunch of editors who sit in a room and decide what news should look like,” Sattvik says, and emphasises the importance of presentation and diversity in making something go viral. Pragya says, “There is a massive disconnect between the people who are thinking about marketing and people who are thinking about editorial.”Andre chips in, “Content creation and journalism, for me, don’t have to be two different things.”Abhinandan responds, “I don’t see how a commercial proposition can be made on that because then there is no incentive to spend on ground reportage where traffic is your only metric.”Listen. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Sanjay Jha is a politician, writer, and columnist. He was sacked as a spokesman of the Congress, apparently over a pair of articles in the Times of India where he criticised the party’s “leadership vacuum”, the lack of “internal democratic process that listens to individual voices” and inability to get “up and running with any sense of urgency” in the wake of electoral defeats.Jha sits down with Abhinandan Sekhri to talk about his politics, what is ailing the Congress, and, of course, his sacking. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Swara Bhasker is one of India’s most outspoken celebrities, regularly lending her voice to progressive causes and public protests. This has made the actor known for her performances in Tanu Weds Manu, Anaarkali of Aarah, and Rasbhari one of the big bugbears of Hindu nationalist TV news anchors and social media trolls.Swara speaks with Meghnad S about nepotism in Bollywood, the audience’s role in creating and sustaining the film industry’s star system, and the rise of streaming platforms. She also speaks about her “activism” while describing herself as “an armchair activist”.To watch the full unedited interview, subscribe to Newslaundry.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Tired of loud frothy-mouth, potty-mouth debates on primetime TV? Tired of sad character-limited fights on Twitter where you don't really learn anything? We have something that might excite you. Newslaundry presents a new podcast: NL vs NL. Let's make debates great again!In this episode of NL vs NL, Shubh Soni and Newslaundry subscriber Dhiraj Bhandari debate whether countries should be allowed to claim territory in space.Dhiraj thinks they should, Shubh disagrees.Listen and tell us who you agree or disagree with, and why. Write to us at contact@newslaundry.com, or reach out to Dhiraj and Shubh. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In May, we released an NL Sena, “The New New Delhi”, a deep dive into the Narendra Modi government’s much-touted project to redesign Central Vista, the heart of the national capital. Reporter Hameeda Syed also analysed just why the government was pushing forward with the project even as the Covid-19 pandemic was ravaging the poor.In this edition of Session with Sena, Hameeda, along with Newslaundry’s Chitranshu Tewari, talks about the story with the subscribers who made it possible with their contributions. This Sena story was supported by over 50 of our readers, including Sangeeta Thotakura, Shreekant Gupta, Zameer Ansari, Sree Harsha R, Vidhu Saxena, Dhiraj Kumar, and other NL Sena members.Hameeda says the Centre went ahead with the project “without talking about it to experts”, and that the project “came as a shock” to them. A subscriber, Dhiraj, asks about reporting during the midst of a pandemic, and whether it made being on the ground more difficult. Hameeda says it was a problem, since it was visually important to “map all the developments” happening with the project.Subscriber Rupa Banerjee asks about the aftermath of the project. “The aftermath has already happened,” Hameeda says, adding that the Supreme Court had refused to stay the redevelopment plan. “Even though there is a lockdown, I feel there should be some resistance towards the project.”Tune in. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Tired of loud frothy-mouth, potty-mouth debates on primetime TV? Tired of sad character-limited fights on Twitter where you don't really learn anything? We have something that might excite you. Newslaundry presents a new podcast: NL vs NL. Let's make debates great again!In this episode of NL vs NL, Newslaundry subscribers Aditya Relangi and Aishwarya Mahesh debate whether public health should be prioritised over personal privacy.Aditya thinks it should be, Aishwarya disagrees.Listen and tell us who you agree or disagree with, and why. Write to us at contact@newslaundry.com, or reach out to Aditya and Aishwarya. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Kritika Pandey is a writer and poet. Her short story The Great Indian Tee and Snakes recently won the 2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize. She has also won the 2020 James W Foley Memorial Award and the 2018 Harvey Swados Fiction Prize. Pandey sat down with Abhinandan Sekhri to talk about her life, work and literary journey.“I was responding to the contemporary sociopolitical upheavals in India,” Kritika says when asked about the inspiration for The Great Indian Tee and Snakes, while pointing out the varied receptions it got from her peers in the United States and back home in Jharkhand. She talks about the trade-off involved in keeping the local flavour in a story while ensuring that it has a global appeal. She stresses the importance of engaging with people holding different points of view while commenting on the “overwoke” people in the US in the context of the current political situation. She narrates her experience attending the Black Lives Matter protests against the murder of George Flyod, and discusses how the protest cultures in India and the US differ. Kritika also talks about experiencing gender discrimination, desi families and validation, what’s next for her, and much more. Tune in!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On the Global Press Freedom Index, India ranks 142 out of 180 countries. To make sense of why a country that prides itself on being the world’s largest democracy fares so abysmally on press freedom, it’s imperative to locate and speak about the different pressures that journalists are under.To this end, Roli Pulse, the digital arm of Roli Books, in association with Newslaundry, organised a webinar with Siddharth Varadarajan, editor of the Wire; Naresh Fernandes, editor of Scroll; Dhanya Rajendran, chief editor of the News Minute; and Abhinandan Sekhri, co-founder of Newslaundry.They discuss the pressures the Indian media faced in the past and how they are different from what it must deal with today. Intimidation, they agree, has become “more systematic” now, and this can only be countered by institutionally empowering journalists.They also talk about how institutions such as the judiciary have responded to the intimation of the media, recognise the urgent need to have a united press, and acknowledge that press associations currently are inaccessible to most journalists.Varadarajan shares his experiences dealing with the pressure put by former Tamil Nadu chief minister J Jayalalithaa on the Hindu when he was the daily’s editor. Fernandes examines what it means to be a journalist today when even a Facebook post critical of the establishment attracts heat and even institutional interference. Rajendran expresses her concern about the sphere of hate that has been created in the society and that, in turn, has led to public mistrust of journalists who are critical of majoritarianism.They also discuss the line that we need to draw under "hate speech", and whether criminalisation is the answer to the problems we face because of it.Listen! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Tired of loud frothy-mouth, potty-mouth debates on primetime TV? Tired of sad character-limited fights on Twitter where you don't really learn anything? We have something that might excite you. Newslaundry presents a new podcast: NL vs NL. Let's make debates great again!In this episode of NL vs NL, Shardool Katyayan and Parikshit Sanyal of Newslaundry battle it out over the highly contentious question of whether marijuana should be legalised in India?Shardool thinks it should be, Parikshit disagrees.Listen and tell us who you agree or disagree with, and why. Write to us at contact@newslaundry.com, or reach out to Shardool and Parikshit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The news media, like most spaces, has a big blindspot when it comes to the representation of women, even as they bear the brunt of the negative impact of the information explosion. How and why is it so? What can be done to rectify the situation.  To discuss these questions, Chitranshu Tewari spoke with Lakshmi Chaudhry, the founder of Splainer Media and the co-founder of Firstpost. She talks about her journey launching Splainer, how news is an exclusionary space for women on both the publication and the reader side, and why news needs to be conceptualised as an experience to begin with. She also talks about the overabundance of news causing "news fatigue", and how the comeback of newsletters is a response to this phenomenon.Subscribe to Splainer: https://splainer.in/subscribeSign up for Stop Press: https://bit.ly/StopPressNewsletterTune in. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The news media is in a crisis. Already struggling with falling revenues and eroding credibility, the media has been left to battle for survival by the Covid pandemic and its economic fallout. Is there a way of this crisis? If there’s, where does it lead?To discuss the challenges facing the news media and how they can be dealt with, Newslaundry organised a webinar in partnership with the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Abhinandan Sekhri of Newslaundry is joined by Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, director of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and political communication professor at the University of Oxford; Ritu Kapoor, co-founder of the Quint and a member of the board at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism; Anant Goenka, executive director of the Indian Express; and Avinash Pandey, CEO of the ABP News Network.Listen! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Hasina Kharbhih is the founder of the Impulse NGO Network, a civil society organisation based in Shillong, Meghalaya, which works to combat human trafficking in Northeast India, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. INGON, as it’s popularly known, has helped rescue and rehabilitate thousands of trafficked women and children over the past two decades.In this interview with Snigdha Sharma, Hasina explains the origin of the “impulse model” that uses a multidisciplinary approach to combat human trafficking.To watch the full unedited interview, subscribe to Newslaundry.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Indian television news has acquired an unsavoury reputation over the past few years owing to the bombastic anchors and their primetime rants peddling bigotry. Now, in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, as advertising revenues, the chief source of income for mainstream media, dwindle, can TV news survive in its current form?To discuss this and much more, Roli Pulse, the digital arm of Roli Books, organised a webinar with three of India’s most prominent news professionals – Barkha Dutt, Faye D’Souza and Abhinandan Sekhri.D’Souza, the former executive editor of Mirror Now, described the business model of TV news as “point and shoot” journalism where accusations were hurled with little evidence. “A journalist who cares about ethics at this point, facts and fact-checking is an inconvenience.” D’Souza said. “Let’s be honest. Your viewer is no longer your customer. Your advertiser is your customer.”D’Souza, as also Sekhri, praised the quality of Dutt’s journalism during the coronavirus lockdown. The former NDTV star anchor who now runs Mojo Story has travelled thousands of kilometres to tell the stories of migrant workers who have been walking home after being stranded in alien places by the lockdown, without food or a source of income.Dutt complained that journalism had become formulaic, with stale studio panel discussions and the “privileging of anchors over reporters”. She said the initial responses to her new project indicated there was “certainly an audience for raw, authentic, content from the ground”.Listen. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Following up on their last webinar, “Is TV news dead”, Roli Books brought together another panel to debate the other aspect of the topic, “Television News: Relevance and Credibility in Today’s India”. Abhinandan Sekhri, co-founder of Newslaundry, was joined by Nidhi Razdan, executive editor of NDTV, and Saahil Menghani, news reporter and anchor.Razdan argued that the continued popularity of television news showed that it was still popular. “It is not dead, simply because viewership has gone up massively since the pandemic began.” She later added, “There are actually more people watching television today after the pandemic started, many more people.”In response, Abhinandan pointed to the absence of “news” in the primetime shows aired by some of India’s most popular TV channels. “Even if they get 100 percent of the viewership, I would still say that TV news is dead,” he added. “Because what they are watching is not news.”Menghani argued that the coverage of the Delhi carnage and the coronavirus pandemic had narrowed the “gap in credibility” between television and digital media. Discussing Barkha Dutt’s coverage of the migrant crisis, Menghani said “one individual singlehandedly changed the narrative, rather set the agenda for most of the news channels. That excludes NDTV because from day one, they have been getting it right.”They also discussed the business model of TV channels, the lack of pushback from advertisers, the entertainment aspect of TV “news”, and layoffs in the media industry during the pandemic.Listen! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
For over a month, India and China have been locked in a tense border conflict in eastern Ladakh. The standoff turned violent early this week, leading to the killing of 20 Indian soldiers. Grim as the situation is, it is not quite clear what exactly is happening on the ground, and what it means for relations between the two countries. To demystify the conflict and explain its strategic and political implications, Mehraj D Lone spoke with Happymon Jacob, one of India’s foremost strategic affairs experts. Jacob teaches at Jawaharlal Nehru University’s School of International Studies, and writes extensively on India’s strategic and foreign policies, the Kashmir dispute, and disarmament. He is the author of The Line of Control: Travelling with the Indian and Pakistani Armies and Line on Fire: Ceasefire Violations and India–Pakistan Escalation Dynamics. In this conversation, held before the faceoff turned violent, Jacob argues that the ongoing conflict is not a usual border transgression. It needs to be seen in the larger geopolitical context of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor, potential presence of Chinese soldiers in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir, India’s recent declarations about retaking Aksai Chin. As to how India should respond, he says its policymakers must realise that “China doesn’t believe in a peaceful rise anymore”. From a military perspective, he adds, “it’s not all that easy for India to dislodge Chinese soldiers from Ladakh” but it has the upper hand along other parts of the Line of Actual Control. He also talks about dealing with China economically, diplomatically, and in the maritime space, while looking for avenues of cooperation. Jacob also talks about the BJP government’s foreign policy, the abrogation of Article 370 and the introduction of a new domicile policy in Jammu and Kashmir. Tune in!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (6)

Shivam Rastogi

It was great hearing both the parties. Please do continue your good work !

Jun 17th
Reply

Upp

Plants do not have a central nervous system. There is no confirmed study that proves that plants have feelings. Whereas animals feel pain and fear just as humans do. They're tortured and raped.

Jun 1st
Reply

tapan dixit

How can you get a meat eater to talk about Veganism!! You want us to take this debate seriously??

May 24th
Reply

SANJAY GORA

Manisha speaks too fast and in a mumbling way to make relaxed listening difficult

Apr 14th
Reply (2)
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