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Our Fake History

Author: ourfakehistory / Entertainment One (eOne)

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A podcast about myths we think are history and history that might be hidden in myths! Awesome stories that really (maybe) happened!
125 Episodes
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Easter Island, or Rapa Nui as the indigenous islanders call it, may be the most misunderstood place on planet Earth. For centuries outsiders have tried to unravel what they perceived to be the islands many mysteries. How did stone age people manage to get to such a remote island? How did these people build the island’s remarkable statues? What caused this unique society to collapse? Recent research has completely upended many previous assumptions about this storied island. Was the mysterious collapse even a collapse at all? Tune in an find out how awesome canoes, ancestor mana, and OFH’s favourite ocean current all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
William Shakespeare is easily the best known playwright in the English language. His works are praised as some of the greatest feats of writing and are still required reading throughout the English speaking world. But what if the man from Stratford-upon- Avon was not the true author of the plays? What if the “Bard” was actually an illiterate who bumbled into fame and fortune? There are still hundreds of educated people who believe William Shakespeare was the biggest fraud in literary history. Listen and find out how aristocratic conspiracies, faked deaths, secret ciphers, Morse code, and Mark Twain all play a role in this story!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In November of 2017 OFH did a series on the birth of Rock 'n Roll. Back then Sebastian was so terrified about getting sued that he did not include any of the music discussed in the episode. He has since been assured that "fair use" provisions in copyright law make it completely cool to use clips for the purposes of education and criticism! Seb has stopped being a baby and has finally added the music to the shows!Now is your chance to hear these episodes the way they always should have been heard--- with the music! Enjoy!   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In November of 2017 OFH did a series on the birth of Rock 'n Roll. Back then Sebastian was so terrified about getting sued that he did not include any of the music discussed in the episode. He has since been assured that "fair use" provisions in copyright law make it completely cool to use clips for the purposes of education and criticism! Seb has stopped being a baby and has finally added the music to the shows! Now is your chance to hear these episodes the way they always should have been heard--- with the music! Enjoy!   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
On this OFH Throwback we return to an episode from two summers ago called “Who Invented Your Favourite Sport?” This re-release is being done in honour of the postponed 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, which should have started this past Friday. The original episode was recorded in the wake of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. Back then the mythology of sport was on my mind, and in particular the fake history associated with the origins of sports. So even though you can’t watch the Olympics right now, you can enjoy me nerding out on some weird sports lore. I hope in 2021 when the world finally comes together for the Olympics we will not only be celebrating athletic greatness, but we will also be celebrating the end of a pandemic, and the doctors, nurses, and scientists that helped us get there.             See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In 1324 the Malian Emperor, Mansa Musa, made a pilgrimage to Mecca that would stun the Islamic world with its magnificence. If the sources are to be believed, the emperor traveled with an entourage 60 000 fellow pilgrims and untold quantities of pure West African gold. While travelling through Egypt his lavish spending flooded the country with so much gold that he apparently caused an economic crisis. Precious metals were devalued and Egypt fell into a recession that it would take years to recover from... or at least, so goes the story. Is it true that Mansa Musa had enough gold to destabilize one of the strongest economies in the medieval world? Is it even possible to accurately calculate the wealth of someone from the 1300's? Tune in and find out how tips on copper, half-remembered conversations, and payments in gold-dust all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
One of the most pernicious historical myths to ever circulate is the wrongheaded belief that sub-Saharan Africa was uncivilized and devoid of history before the era of European colonialism. The sophistication and opulence of the Mali Empire during the 13th and 14th centuries completely shreds that idea. Many historians have pointed out that in the 1300's Mali was wealthier, better organized, and more literate than most European societies. The Kings, or Mansas, of Mali may have even been the richest people to have ever lived. But are the tales of the Mansas' wealth believable? Tune in and find out how a hungering lion, African Atlantic explorers, and gold dust currency all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
There are few tales of revenge as epic as that of Olga of Kiev. In 945 AD Olga set out on a campaign of vengeance that would make a lasting mark on the history of Eastern Europe. However, there is good reason to believe it never actually happened. The source that contains the tale of Olga's vengeance is among the most unreliable chronicles of the medieval era. What should we believe about one of Eastern Europe's most merciless female rulers? Tune in and find out how arrogant boat faces, burning bathhouses, and a baptism switcheroo all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this quick announcement Sebastian lets everyone know that the next Our Fake History will be released on June 23. Sebastian also expresses the podcast's solidarity with all of those protesting for an end to racism. He also points his listeners towards a few resources to learn more about Black history in the USA and Canada. Follow this link to check out the Library of Congress Civil Rights Oral History collection: https://www.loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/ Follow this link for the interviews featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture: https://nmaahc.si.edu/explore/initiatives/oralhistory/civil-rights-history-project  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
After unifying the "Warring States" the first emperor of China turned his attention to an even more lofty goal: becoming an immortal. When describing the first emperor the ancient sources paint a picture of man consumed by narcissism and paranoia. We're told that in his quest to defy death the first emperor put his trust in shady magicians and smooth talking charlatans. Did the hunt for eternal life actually kill China's first emperor? Tune in and find out how the strongest man in China, a sea monster, and a conspicuously good lute player all play a roll in the story.  Buy T-shirts, mugs, and even face masks here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/our-fake-history?ref_id=9701  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In Chinese folklore the first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, is never presented as a hero. Instead he is always presented as villain who is undone by his own arrogance and impiety. He is often introduced in folk tales as the "Wicked Emperor Qin Shi Huang". However, historians believe that many of the most salacious stories about China's first emperor may have been exaggerated or invented by later writers who did not care for his preferred philosophy. Has one of China's most significant figures been the victim of fake history? Tune in and find out how ghost tablets, huge dongs, and a philosophy more Machiavellian than Machiavelli all play a role in the story.      See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
If you were going to make a list of the most historically influential people to have have ever lived, Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China, should probably be in the top 10. In the mid 2nd century BC, the ruler of the State of Qin embarked on series of conquests that would unite China after centuries of discord. But despite this impressive achievement, the first emperor has been saddled with a particularly nasty historical reputation. Even the ancient Chinese historians did not remember him fondly. Does he really deserve this vicious reputation, or has he been the victim of fake history? Tune-in and find out how a scheming merchant, a castrated historian, and 8000 clay soldiers all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The rebellion led by Boudica, the Iceni warrior woman, nearly dislodged the Roman empire from the island of Britain. She had the numbers, the momentum, and a righteous cause. So why was she ultimately not successful? Tune in and find out how Druids casting spells, a mythical train platform, and a badass post-hardcore band name all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The ancient rebel leader Boudica has become an icon in her native Britain. She is celebrated as a symbol of resistance and female power. However, getting a sense of her true character is nearly impossible when examining the historical sources. Roman historians wrote elaborate speeches that they claimed she delivered to rapt audiences. But perhaps these speeches tell us more about the Roman authors than they do about the Celtic war leader. Tune in and find out how ancient Eminem verses, Heart of Darkness, and superhero origin stories all play a role in the story.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
They say that history is written by the winners. While it's a trite cliché, there might be some truth in it. It's especially true when examining a figure like the Celtic-British freedom fighter Boudica. In 60 AD Boudica led her people in a violent revolt against the Roman Empire. Unfortunately everything we know about her was written by Romans. What should we believe? Tune in and find out how Winston Churchill, the end of the earth, and tiny bean sized meals all play a roll in the story!   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
When did the Renaissance begin? When did it end? Do these questions even have proper answers? In this episode Sebastian frets over the so-called "Renaissance Myth" and tries to draw some conclusions. Should the idea of a "Renaissance" be ditched, or does the period just need some clever re-branding. Tune in and find out how good people in hell, the fall of Rome, and all the Ninja Turtles play a role in the story.     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The Renaissance has been touted as one of the most important moments in European history. 19th century historians like Jules Michelet and Jakob Burckhardt made the case that a "rebirth" starting in the 1300's laid the ground work for the modern world. This idea has been massively influential, but its not without its critics. Why do some claim that Renaissance is actually a historical myth? Tune in and find out how weird lawn aeration jobs, snobbish ideas about Italy, and lost cities all play a role in the story.    Get Our Fake History merch at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/our-fake-history?ref_id=9701  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In the 1890's a team of physicians and scientists discovered the cause of bubonic plague, a bacteria they named Yersinia Pestis. It was assumed for most of the 20th century that Yersinia Pestis also caused the infamous Black death of the 14th century. But starting in the 1980's a number of experts started to question this assumption. Does this theory still stand up to scrutiny? Tune in and find out how ebola, basilisk potions, and the top speed of a rat all play a roll in the story.      See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
When studying the plague of the 14th century it can be easy to focus on the death, but on Our Fake History we are so much more interested in life. The people who lived through the plague dealt with the horror of the disease in a variety of weird and wonderful ways. Some people turned to religion, others to hedonism. Some felt like the only option was to whip themselves in public. Tune in and find out how plague parties, the alignment of Mars and Jupiter, and a plague hag named "Pesta" all play role in the story.    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
The epidemic known as the Black Death struck Europe in 1347 and completely upended medieval society. It's been estimated that roughly half of the European population was killed by this gruesome disease. Despite huge advances in our understanding of this epidemic debate still remains about the true cause of the plague. The so-called "Great Mortality" also remains the source of a number of tenacious historical myths. Tune in and find out how biological warfare, pockets full of posies, and rattus rattus all play a role in the story.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (127)

Fender Stratocastic

Garbage SJW take.

Sep 16th
Reply

M. W. Morris

Dear Mr. Major: I'm still enjoying your podcast. However, you're pronouncing the word "deity" like "deity". It should sound like dayity.

Aug 11th
Reply

M. W. Morris

Dear Mr. Major: I'm enjoying the podcast. Much more info than what was taught in school. However, as an English student of many years, may I offer a correction? You are pronouncing the word "conflagration " as "conflagAration".

Aug 11th
Reply

Shannon Kirk

always excited to hear the new episode

Jul 19th
Reply

Jerry Hampton

Funny how they leave out that all that gold was mined by African slaves.

Jul 11th
Reply (1)

Kayla of the Library

I really hate Cortés now.

Jul 2nd
Reply

M. W. Morris

the possessive of Tacitus is pronounced Tacitus, not Tacituses. It's spelled Tacitus' not Tacitus's.

May 13th
Reply

Marion Barton

I absolutely love this podcast! Just started listening and trying to go through the whole back catalogue. And my kids think I am so weird and funny but I have to dance around to the intro and outro music EVERY TIME! 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟

May 9th
Reply

robert outen

the French ambassador made it quite clear during an official visit that when he met Queen Elizabeth 1st that the dress she was wearing showed everything from her boobs to her navel. in fact he said that her skin was extremely smooth and he admired the view. can't remember the name of the ambassador bit it was in an official letter.

May 5th
Reply

Markus Eurola

Never even thought of this, 'congrats of your Fender. I've three, all of them played by s' me sort of musician.

Apr 15th
Reply

Happy🔬Heritic

I LOVE plague history! - I take no pleasure in the great suffering/death of peoples past, I just find epidemiology fascinating.

Apr 7th
Reply

Stiles

Wow I was correct, the Black Death was caused by Muslums.

Mar 21st
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Jeremy Cartwright

Great episode!

Mar 15th
Reply

Tim Starr

o7o7o

Mar 11th
Reply

Happy🔬Heritic

Sebastian- Thank you so much for sharing your amazing talent & knowledge through this podcast! You truly make an art of history- so vividly painted with a pallet that's second to no other. -If you can't tell...I'm a HUGE fan & became immediately captivated upon my first listen about a month ago. I plan to join your Patreon asap & really look forward to hearing the extra content.

Mar 9th
Reply

Gabe Henning

I still really hate the music. saxophone and shouting are not conducive to my listening pleasure.

Mar 6th
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Sarah Hull

“DEEPLY Canadian” 😂

Mar 5th
Reply

Art d'Arrigo

Great book Venice: the Hinge of Europe. published 1964. Really illustrates the medieval roots of the engagement with the east. Really expanded my mind and understanding of the period by considering the Ottoman as a European Empire. also very good on under-served history of Balkans, Ukraine, Russia and the importance of Orthodox/Latin church rivalry. cannot recommend more highly. And yes...there was a Renaissance....even if people apprehend the term.

Feb 26th
Reply

Happy🔬Heritic

Wow...this podcast is fantastic! It's my new favorite-really excited to discover it.

Feb 9th
Reply (3)

Stiles

I had always thought he was known as the creator of socialism. What a surprise.

Jan 15th
Reply
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