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For this special episode, the tables turn as Poet jessica Care moore, along with Jasmin Leigh, interview People’s Party’s own Talib Kweli. This wide-ranging conversation answers so many of the questions we get from fans and listeners! Kweli goes deep on his many famous collaborators, his approach to the new Black Star album "No Fear of Time,", and his relationship with social media. If you’re a fan of Kweli, and understand his place in hip-hop, this is the interview you need. He’s funny, thoughtful, and most of all, bracingly honest. Mentions: BUGS BUNNY MATHEMATICX episode on "The Midnight Miracle" Listen to this episode for free on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bugs-bunny-mathematicx/id1564022392?i=1000556655602 Listen for free on Luminary:  https://luminarypodcasts.com/listen/talib-kweli-yasiin-bey-and-dave-chappelle/the-midnight-miracle/bugs-bunny-mathematicx/4b5049c9-cae7-4630-93d1-7ca145909b68
Cory Mo has been present at some of the most important moments in hip-hop history–as a producer, a rapper, and an early legend of Southern hip-hop. From his early beginnings with his brother Mike Mo, to being in the studio with Kanye West and Mike Dean, he's got stories for days. But his time with Pimp C, his mentor and his friend, solidified his legacy in hip-hop.
The legendary producer, songwriter, actor and DJ talks about his early days of scratching, and takes us into hit songs like “Parent’s Just Don’t Understand” and “Summertime.”   Jazzy Jeff also talks about working on the television show “The Fresh Prince,” the work of developing artists like Jill Scott, The Roots, Eminem, and Talib Kweli, and breaks down the best rap releases of the ‘90s.
You’ve never met a person like will.i.am. He’s a rapper, a producer, a futurist, an autodidact, and generally one of the most fascinating humans on the planet. And this longform interview with Kweli—a close personal friend—is the definitive conversation with the globally renowned multi-hyphenate. Do you love rap? Dance? Techno? Humanity itself? Then you want to hear more from will.i.am. Seriously. And in this riveting conversation, he’s raw, funny, unguarded, and—as always—deeply inquisitive!
The singer, sax player, and multi-instrumentalist Masego takes us into his world of jazz and discusses the art form's roots as dance music. Masego also shares stories of his travels, discusses the universal language of music, and takes us behind the stunning visuals that almost always accompany his best songs. If you want to hear to masters of their craft geek out on all things music, this is a must-listen.
The innovative producer, rapper, singer, and songwriter talks about working with greats such as Drake, Beyoncé, Kanye, and Eminem, then takes us behind the creation of some of his most well-known songs.   The multi-hyphenate also breaks down his long relationship with rapper Dom Kennedy, and tells us why FL Studio is his DAW of choice.
Curator, DJ, and tastemaker K. Foxx talks about her life in radio, including the tips she picked up from working with DJ Khaled, and how things went during her most memorable and difficult interviews. K. Foxx also describes the differences between Miami, NYC, and Philly radio, the K. Foxx Princess Project Proms, and her falling out with Ebro.
West Coast G-Funk legend Warren G sits down with Talib Kweli and Jasmin Leigh to share stories from the recording sessions of “The Chronic,” and “Regulate,” as well as his most beloved albums.   Warren G also expresses his love for east coast hip hop, his passion for BBQ sauce, and how the 1995 Source Awards changed G-Funk forever.
Comedian and SNL alum Jay Pharoah sits down with Talib Kweli to go deep on hip hop, stand-up comedy, and the power of impressions. From his rap albums to his latest on-screen projects, Pharoah and Kweli chop it up with behind the scenes stories from some of Pharoah’s most memorable work. Also in this episode: more on Pharoah’s run in with the police during the COVID lockdown.
Faith Evans is R&B incarnate. Her voice, style, and musical sensibilities are generation-defining. Hear her run through some of the stories behind her most well-known songs, as well as speak on the legacy of her late husband, Biggie Smalls. We also get into some antics from her R&B Divas and The Masked Singer days that are sure to keep you laughing. If you’ve ever felt moved—be it to dance, cry, laugh or love—because of Faith’s music you’re going to want to hear about it from the source. Here is a true Queen of R&B.
Alyasha Moore is an integral player in the story of streetwear. This cultural bridge-builder helped to fuse the worlds of New York City street culture—from graffiti to punk rock, to hip hop—forging a unique aesthetic that has come to dominate fashion (on both the casual and luxury fronts).   Streetwear isn’t streetwear without Alyasha Moore and this convo underscores that vital fact.
Omari Hardwick is straight-up one of the most exciting multi-hyphenate artists working right now. In this lengthy interview he runs us through his early struggles while chasing his dreams, and dives deep into some of his most important achievements—from his work on American Skin to Zach Snyder’s brilliant Army of the Dead. More info: Hear Omari's podcast, Poetics, a show that doesn't just discuss poetry with hip-hop artists, it makes it. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/poetics/id1567727299
Selema Masekela is a legend in the board sports community. When there were very few Black voices in skate, snow, and surf, he was there–hosting shows for Vice, ESPN, ABC and more. Now that the action sports world is growing more inclusive, Selema is a central figure in the conversation, pushing the industries he loves while also launching his own label, Mami Wata, the nation’s first Afrocentric surf brand. In this deep-dive convo with Kweli and Jasmin, Selema shares memories of his world renowned father, jazz impresario Hugh Masekela, gets raw about how race is handled on the snow and in the surf, and talks about his new company. He also discusses his music, his recent viral tweet about vigilante justice, and so much more. This is a much needed interview with an icon in action sports and one of the best TV sportscasters in the game.
Our guest today is a flow artist with more mixtapes to his name already than the average rapper has in their whole career. Those tapes include Rosecrans, Coffee and Kush, OT: Outta Town, Welcome To Mollywood 1, 2, and 3. He also dropped Million Dollar Afro with Iamsu!. Hotels 1 and 2, Chachiville and The Separation, two studio albums, including Selfish and S2, and a debut EP called Understand Me that charted on both the Billboard Heatseekers and R&B and Hip-Hop charts.v  Rapper Problem has written with artists like Snoop Dogg, and his contributions on Ego Trippin’ and Malice N Wonderland cannot be overstated. He’s also worked with everyone from 9th Wonder to Nipsey Hustle, to John Legend, to DJ Quik, to YG, to Pharrell, to Kendrick Lamar. That’s a collaborator list if ever there was one.  If you haven’t heard his giant single “Like Whaaat,” you’ve probably heard his songs “Say That Then,” and “Do It Big,” both of which appeared on Grand Theft Auto V. He’s an independent musician through and through, with hometown pride: he gave the LA Rams their theme song “My Squad.”
Whether it’s on The Walking Dead, or Moxie, or the slasher There's Someone Inside Your House, Sydney Park has got “it:' star power. And that unique, undeniable charisma is on full display in this episode of People's Party.  While discussing her movie and TV roles and getting raw about dealing with online trolls, Park’s “good energy” is undeniable. She’s an open book, and her commitment to her craft is on full display. Check this episode for a deep dive into a thoughtful, eloquent, incredibly talented actress on the rise–a woman who is building a star-level career while rejecting the lure of social media
Tommy Davidson is an icon. Straight up and no doubts. No two or three ways about it. And we’ve got him on the show in classic form—laughing, having fun, doing impressions… But also: going deep, getting raw about his childhood, and telling little-known stories about his early career.  If you know the name Tommy Davidson, you need to hear this interview . It’s raw, it’s real, it’s funny as hell, and it's heartfelt.
In 12 years rapper, producer, and director Hopsin has given us six albums including Gazing At The Moonlight, Raw, Knock Madness, Pound Syndrome, No Shame, and this year’s Minor Disturbance. In that time, he also launched two record labels—Funk Volume and Undercover Prodigy—all while cultivating a unique image and distinct flow that sets him apart from the pack. This interview is his most thoughtful, deep, and revealing ever. It’s a powerful conversation with a true visionary and deeply distinct voice!
Chaunté Wayans is very, very funny. But she’s also deeply aware of the pressure of her family name and the expectations that come with that. In fact, it’s what led to one of her funniest bits—a joke about delivering food while also appearing on TV. (Google “Chaunté Wayans and Postmates” to see what we mean.) That reflective approach to comedy and to her own life serves Chaunté well, and has made her both a better comic and a more thoughtful person. In this week's conversation both aspects are on display as she speaks candidly about: meeting her father for the first time, the power and drawbacks of her family name, giving advice to other young comics, and more.  The episode is a funny and super insightful look at a rising star in the comedy scene.
Big Boy is in the house (or neighborhood!) and Kweli and Jas are ready to get raw with one of the most iconic DJs in radio history. For those who know his work, Big Boy is well known. But Kweli, a rapper he knows, brings out a whole new gear – making this a must listen for anyone who loves hip-hop culture and recognizes how it’s been shaped by radio. Check it!
You want a complicated man? A seeker and thinker and brilliant multi-hyphenate? You gotta check our episode with Krondon. The actor-rapper-author-speaker brings it in this episode--giving us plenty of laughs and revealing his inspiring thought processes.  From plumbing the depths of his character Tobias Whale on CW’s Black Lightning to breaking down the “5 Ps” of trauma that need to be undone to live happily (you’ve got to hear it to fully get it), Krondon drops so many gems that it’s hard to track them all. But as much as big ideas and his acting work are on the table, there’s also plenty of rap chat, including lots of talk about the artist’s legendary LA group, Strong Arm Steady.  This episode is riveting in all the best ways, and is sure to captivate new and longtime Krondon fans.
Comments (20)

jermaine stephens

great discussion. wish there was more about this blk men vs blk women & the bottom of the totem theory. don't understand why sisters are seen as at the bottom when brothers are behind in college degrees, stem, and corporate acceptance & are incarceratedat the highest rate relativelyspeaking...

Jun 28th
Reply

mikeyG

we went to Boblo Island for our 7th grade trip!!,,that shit was 🔥to Ghetto kids!!!!

Jun 25th
Reply

mikeyG

when you gonna get RUN or RAKIM ???

Jun 24th
Reply

James Jr

oh man! oh man oh man! y'all are the best! Thanks so much to Yasin for blessing us wit his presence!

Jun 14th
Reply

thayden

Had to bail on this episode when Dax sang the joys of capitalism after acknowledging benefitting from rent control when he was poor. Amazing how quickly people move on when they get a bit of money. Gentrification is a bad thing. It does not help the community. It pushes the community out of their homes, it displaces them, because of capitalism and it's insatiability. That's before we even get into the environmental impact. Dax came across as an incredibly selfish person, ignorant and lacking in self awareness. Dax is in a career that has benefitted from HUGE amounts of luck, and seems to think his current status is purely on merit. Genuinely surprised at his views. Kinda confused as to why he took this interview.

Jan 21st
Reply

Miltz

BEAUUUUTIFUL CONVERSATION!!!

Nov 9th
Reply

dr.mobina safaee

😂😂😂😂😂😂 so good.....its coolllllll😂

Nov 6th
Reply

Chris Akers

ecleftic was a great album.

Aug 3rd
Reply

Patricia Williams

Wow, just wow! What a great interview with one of my favorite artists! admittedly, you did the damn thing my brother. you are a great interviewer and you ask really solid questions. what was most impressive-wise the way you approached the interview, and the way that you probed the guest. you have a real knack for inviting guests to speak openly and transparently. bravo!

May 16th
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Jay Faulkner

Loved this, foreal. So much perspective and insight on historical important moments from the viewpoint of Kiss. I learned a lot from this podcast, gained appreciation and I'm even more of a fan. Thank you Talib, thank you Jada and shout out to Jasmine 🙏🏾💐🖤

Apr 16th
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mikeyG

John's Poly Sci Album was an is still Dope AF!!

Mar 3rd
Reply

Namon Anderson

Michael Rapaport has no filter. I appreciate your dialogue about you being a guru on race relations by your experiences and scholarship.

Feb 13th
Reply

Patch

audio quality is dodgey AF. shame as the content is good..

Feb 10th
Reply

mrmaheia@att.net

Definitely down with Planet Asia. Love the conversation. Dropping knowledge. Keep it coming Talib. Peace God !

Jan 27th
Reply

Namon Anderson

Great Interview. Forward 'ever, backwards never.

Jan 5th
Reply

Aieya Jean

this was by far one of my favorite episodes because RG talked pure unadulterated music. I think a correction is warranted however....u guys talked about jazz bands to some degree and relatability to hip hop but did not mention mufk'n Stetsasonic. Daddyo still got bars. how did u guys overlook them?

Dec 27th
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Madeinspace

Oh Michelle. Michael Vick did more than fight dogs (he tortured them when they lost). And he never really apologized or showed remorse. There’s even a documentary about this. I appreciate the need to allow people to be redeemed but show me the evidence he is redeemable other than having served a sentence that honestly should have been a loooooy longer to begin with.

Dec 21st
Reply (2)

Amanda Bennett

'less white Ryan seacrest' 😂😂😂😂

Aug 20th
Reply
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