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Policy Forum Pod is the podcast of Policy Forum.net - Asia and the Pacific's platform for public policy debate, analysis and discussion. Policy Forum is based at Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University.
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The National Disability Insurance Scheme is a significant policy. Launched in 2016, the NDIS provides support to Australians with a disability, their families, and their carers. But while it has been broadly welcomed, its implementation has not been without significant challenges. This week on Policy Forum Pod we hear from former Labor government Minister Jenny Macklin, Dr Gemma Carey, and Clare Moore about what it will take to fix the NDIS. Pod hosts Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce also chat to Carolyn Hendriks about the ‘Stomping Grounds’ project and how it could change the way our cities and towns are used, and discuss some of your questions and suggestions for future pods.Gemma Carey is the Research Director of the Centre for Social Impact UNSW and an NHMRC Fellow. She holds a PhD in social policy and population health from the University of Melbourne and a Masters in Anthropology from the University of Adelaide. Her current research is concerned with the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.Clare Moore is the Chief Executive Officer of WWDACT, Women with Disabilities ACT, an advocacy organisation that promotes the human rights of women and girls with a disability in the Canberra region. WWDACT are passionate about intersectionality, health care, housing and education.Jenny Macklin was the Minister for Disability reform under the Gillard and Rudd Labor governments. Jenny was instrumental in the national roll-out for the NDIS, overseeing the design and implementation of the Scheme.Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance, at Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. She has taught and published widely on the application and politics of inclusive and deliberative forms of citizen engagement.Tess McGirr is a Sir Roland Wilson PhD scholar at Crawford School researching how social services can complement welfare reform to improve employment outcomes. Tess has a long-held passion for social policy.Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.This podcast was produced with the support of the ANU Australian Crawford Leadership Forum, held on 24/25 June. The Forum brought together 150 international and domestic speakers to discuss the theme of ‘Rebuilding trust’.Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
Fake news, global media moguls flexing their political muscles, getting people to pay for journalism, and the challenge posed by social media companies – the problems facing the media and journalism are many. In our panel discussion this week, Gideon Rachman of the Financial Times, Siddharth Varadarajan of The Wire, and Amy Remeikis of The Guardian Australia talk to Mark Kenny and Jill Sheppard about the future of the media. Pod hosts Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce also chat to Professor Mirya Holman about getting more women in political leadership positions, how female political candidates use Twitter, and the connection between pandemics and the politics of climate change.Amy Remeikis is Guardian Australia's political reporter. She has covered federal politics, Queensland politics, crime, court, and garden shows during her career, working for radio and newspapers, most recently for Fairfax Media. She was an inaugural nominee of the Young Walkley awards.Gideon Rachman became chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times (FT) in July 2006. He joined the FT after a 15-year career at The Economist, which included spells as a foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington, and Bangkok. He also edited The Economist’s business and Asia sections. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union, and globalisation.Siddharth Varadarajan is an Indian-American journalist, editor, and academic. He is the founding Editor of The Wire and the former Editor of The Hindu. He has reported on the NATO war against Yugoslavia, the destruction of the Bamyan Buddhas by the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, the war in Iraq, and the crisis in Kashmir. Siddharth has edited a book titled Gujarat: The Making of a Tragedy which is about the 2002 Gujarat riots.Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. He is the presenter of the Democracy Sausage podcast.Jill Sheppard is a political scientist at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems.Sara, Martyn, and Mirya also go over some of your questions, comments, and suggestions for future podcasts, discuss the danger of swooping birds, and make a very special announcement about a new course teaching podcasting skills to policymakers.Mirya Holman is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University and a Visiting Fellow at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her research interests focus on political leadership, local politics, gender and politics, research methods, and environmental politics.Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.This podcast was produced with the support of the ANU Australian Crawford Leadership Forum, held on 24/25 June. The Forum brought together 150 international and domestic speakers to discuss the theme of ‘Rebuilding trust’.Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
In March, the Australian Public Service review set out four priorities for change to future-proof the public service. But will those changes be enough to tackle the significant challenges ahead and rebuild declining trust in institutions? We hear from the review’s Chair David Thodey in conversation with Helen Sullivan and get the thoughts of review panel member and fellow policy podcaster Glyn Davis.David Thodey is Chair of the Australian Public Service review, Chair of the Commonwealth Science, Industry & Research Organisation, the national research organisation for Australia, and the Chair of JobsNSW, the NSW independent organisation responsible for the creation of 150K new jobs through to 2020. He was formerly the Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director of Telstra.Glyn Davis is a Distinguished Professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy. He was previously Vice-Chancellor at the University of Melbourne from 2005 to 2018, and is renowned as one of Australia’s finest higher education leaders, whose academic work has shaped the thinking of public servants at all levels of government. He is also the Chief Executive Officer of the Paul Ramsay Foundation, Australia’s largest philanthropic trust. He was the presenter on the Policy Shop podcast.Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Her research and teaching explore the changing nature of state-society relationships; including the theory and practice of governance and collaboration, innovative forms of democratic participation, new thinking about public policy and the practice of public service reform.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.This podcast was produced with the support of the ANU Australian Crawford Leadership Forum, held on 24/25 June. The Forum brought together 150 international and domestic speakers to discuss the theme of ‘Rebuilding trust’.Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
A policy wish list

A policy wish list

2019-06-2000:58:38

If you could have your wishes granted and have Australia’s government implement three policies that would change the country for the better, what would you choose? That’s the question we put to our panel this week. Our experts – Helen Sullivan, Inala Cooper, and Janine O’Flynn give us their wish lists in conversation with Sharon Bessell.Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Her research and teaching explore the changing nature of state-society relationships; including the theory and practice of governance and collaboration, innovative forms of democratic participation, new thinking about public policy and the practice of public service reform.Inala Cooper is a Yawuru woman from Broome in The Kimberley, WA, and is an advocate for Indigenous rights, social justice, and human rights. She is also the Relationships and Engagement Lead at Atlantic Fellows for Social Equity at the University of Melbourne, and is Director on the Board of Culture Is Life.Janine O’Flynn is Professor of Public Management at the University of Melbourne and at ANZSOG. Her expertise is in public management, with particular focus on reform and relationships.Our presenters – Sharon and Martyn – take a closer look into rising tensions between the US and Iran, indigenous incarceration rates in Australia, and the FIFA Women’s World Cup hosted in France this year. Martyn and Julia also discuss some of the suggestions you’ve left us for future episodes.Sharon Bessell is Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.Martyn Pearce is Editor of Policy Forum.Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
Australians support science and having policy informed by the best scientific evidence, but in the recent federal election campaign, science was in short supply. So what more should scientists and the scientific community do to encourage evidence-based policy to tackle the big issues of our time? What responsibilities to scientists have to engage directly with the public, particularly in the frequently hostile environment of social media? And how can we tackle the rise of anti-science? On this Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by two of nation’s leading scientists – Anna-Maria Arabia and Ian Chubb – to put science and science policy under the microscope.Our expert panel also discuss why science isn’t always at the forefront of national debates, the importance of moving away from short-termism when it comes to implementing robust science policy, and how science is presented and debated.Anna-Maria Arabia is Chief Executive of the Australian Academy of Science. She was Principal Adviser to the Hon Bill Shorten. She has worked in senior policy roles in both social and economic portfolios.Ian Chubb was Vice-Chancellor of both Flinders University and the Australian National University, and has been made a Companion of the Order of Australia. He served as Australia’s Chief Scientist from 2011 to 2016, and is an Emeritus Fellow at Crawford School.Our presenters this week – Quentin and Martyn – also discuss how the recent raids on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation have underscored the importance of transparency and public debate. What’s more, they also go over how you – our listeners – can win a mug. Get listening!Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
For a brief moment during Australia’s recent election campaign, everyone’s attention was turned towards electric vehicles – and rightfully so. Electric vehicle sales are booming around the world, and the motor industry is rapidly rolling out electric car models and setting significant sales targets. But with Labor’s electric vehicle policy now barely visible in the rear-view mirror, will policymakers ever take the wheel, or is Australia’s electric vehicle policy in need of roadside assist? On this Policy Forum Podcast, our panel – Michael De Percy, Liz Hanna, and James Prest – drive a discussion about the kind of government intervention and infrastructure Australia needs, ways to incentivise and familiarise consumers when it comes to new technologies, and the crossroads between electric vehicles and health.Michael De Percy is a Senior Lecturer in Political Science in the School of Government and Policy, Fellow of the National Security Institute, and Academic Fellow of IGPA at the University of Canberra.Liz Hanna is a Fellow at the ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment and Chair of the Environmental Health Working Group, World Federation of Public Health Associations.James Prest is a Senior Lecturer at the ANU College of Law, specialising in environmental law with interests in administrative law and litigation. He is a Member of the Executive of the ANU Energy Change Institute.Our presenters – Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce – also discuss Trump's Twitter spat with London Mayor Sadiq Khan during his visit to the UK, as well as the TV series Chernobyl and the issues it brings up about nuclear power. Several bad dog puns later – in efforts to inform listeners on ways to get their paws on a mug – they also go over some comments and suggestions our audience have recently left us.Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
This year, Australia’s National Reconciliation Week theme is ‘Grounded in Truth: Walk Together with Courage’. But just how courageous has Australia’s Indigenous policy been, and what will it take to get it right? Will Ken Wyatt’s appointment as the first Indigenous minister for Indigenous Affairs bring the change that Australia needs? On this episode, we hear from Tony Dreise on the ups-and-downs of Indigenous policies past and present, and get his suggestions for policies for the future. We also consider government spending and whether it’s been proportionate to the levels of disadvantage felt across Indigenous communities.Tony Dreise is Professor of Indigenous Policy Research and Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at the Australian National University. He is nationally and internationally recognised as a First Nations leader in policy, evaluation, and research in the field of education.Our presenters – Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce – also chat about New Zealand’s recent wellbeing budget and how to measure societal success. What’s more, they also reveal a new way for our listeners to win Policy Forum’s highly coveted mugs – so listen up!Sharon Bessell is Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.Show notes | The following were mentioned in this podcast:New Zealand’s wellbeing budgetGross Happiness National Index Child poverty in New ZealandSocial Inclusion IndexReconciliation Week in AustraliaIndigenous communities and wellbeingThe Council for Aboriginal ReconciliationCentre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU)The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Commission (ATSIC)Native Title ActRecognition of Aboriginal rights in the form of native titlesKevin Rudd’s national apology (2008)Uluru Statement from the HeartPaul Keating’s Redfern Park speechThe Whispering in Our Hearts – Henry ReynoldsMorrison Government’s budget allocationKen Wyatt’s appointment as the first Indigenous Minister for Indigenous AffairsJustice reinvestment in BourkeClosing The Gap reportsAustralia’s ‘suicide prevention plan’ is barely worth the name – Gerry GeorgatosPolicy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
Australia’s election result took many by surprise. The polls may have been predicting a win for the Labor Party, but instead it is the Coalition led by Scott Morrison that was returned to government. But with Australia dealing with some of the most serious issues it’s faced in decades, will the Coalition’s policy platform be able to provide the reform the country needs?Our stellar panel – Liz Allen, Paul Burke, John Hewson, and Warwick McKibbin – give us their thoughts on the policy commitments and the challenges ahead for the nation. Will the government have to completely rethink its climate policy? How important is framing when it comes to conversations around migration policy? Can Australia’s economy balance revenue uncertainty with the certainty of the promised budget cuts? Tune in for an excellent discussion.Dr Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University.Associate Professor Paul Burke is an economist focusing on energy, the environment, transport, and developing countries, particularly in the Asia-Pacific. His research includes policies for zero-carbon energy in the Asia-Pacific and Australia’s energy transition.Dr John Hewson is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. In 2014, Dr Hewson joined the Australian National University as Professor at the Crawford School, and Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.Professor Warwick McKibbin is the Director of the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis in the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and is a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington.Presenters Bob Cotton, Quentin Grafton, and Julia Ahrens also take a look at Trump’s provocative tweets aimed at Iran, India’s massive elections, and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. They also discuss several excellent suggestions left for us by you on the Policy Forum Pod Facebook group – keep them coming!Bob Cotton is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School. He has a strong interest in public policy issues, including Australia’s engagement in the Asia Pacific Region. He is a mentor at the National Security College.Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:Trump’s tweet against IranPolicy Forum Pod Facebook group *Democracy Sausage: How did the polls get it so wrong? *SARDI Climate Applications Science ProgramShergold ReportCoalition government’s tax cut promisesFair Share (book) – Michael Keating, Stephen BellAustralia’s hidden economy reviewGonski Review (education)Government’s focus on students with disabilitiesMajor parties’ education policyACT parliament declares climate emergency (SBS)Coalition government’s migration and congestion-relief policy (media release)Labor wage increase promisesMurray-Darling Basin and Menindee fish killsSouth Australia water commission & federal government silences public servantsBob Hawke’s legacyThe Familiar Strange podcastEnsuring better insurance for Australians (Policy Forum) – Gemma CareyPodcast: Can Australia spark an energy changeRoss Garnaut – Climate & energy change in AustraliaPolicy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
Over the past decades, Australia has lacked stability in its climate policy even as climate change becomes impossible for the world to ignore. With Australian voters heading to the polls this Saturday, does the country have the policy promises it needs to spark an energy change? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Ken Baldwin, Kylie Catchpole, and Mark Kenny look at how Australia can transition to renewables even without a strong policy framework to lead the way.Ken Baldwin is Director of the Energy Change Institute at ANU, and Deputy Director of the Research School of Physics and Engineering. Since 2011, he has been a member of the Project Steering Committee for the Australian Energy Technology, and since 2014, he has been a Board member of the South East Region of Renewable Energy Excellence.Kylie Catchpole is at the Research School of Engineering at the Australian National University. Her research interests are in nanotechnology and new materials for solar cell applications. She has a physics degree from the ANU, winning a University Medal, and a PhD from the ANU.Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. He is also the presenter of Policy Forum's Democracy Sausage podcast.Our presenters – Quentin Grafton and Martyn Pearce – also discuss the upcoming election, and the difficulties in understanding multiple policies when trying to cast an informed vote. They also go through some of your recent comments and pod topic suggestions.Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:Dividend Imputation Credits (franking credits and tax system proposed by Labor Party)Labor Party’s Fair Go Action PlanEven greater budget surplus revealed by LaborDemocracy Sausage podcast: Voter fatigue and the fight to the finish linePolicy Forum Pod Facebook GroupAustralia’s 2030 climate change targetWorldwide student climate strike Greta Thunberg at World Economic Forum in DavosLowy Institute poll on attitudes towards climate changeNational Energy Guarantee (NEG) Tony Abbott scraps carbon taxEmissions intensity scheme removed by Turnbull CoalitionClean Energy Target dumped by CabinetMalcolm Turnbull and NEGRenewable Energy TargetCarbon Pollution Reduction SchemeJulia Gillard and Bob Brown – pact with the GreensAustralia’s ‘big stick’ power price planLabor’s electric vehicle targetAdani’s Carmichael coalmine planFour Corners: Cash CowsPolicy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.
In a 24-hour news cycle, the first 100 days of government have remarkable influence on the perceived success or failure of the incoming Ministry. With regards to policy, there are no shortage of suggestions of tweaks, wholesale changes, and shelving of initiatives. In this special Policy Forum Pod extra, a panel from The Australian National University looks at what crucial changes the incoming government needs to make in its first 100 days.Panellists:Professor Russell Gruen is the Dean of the ANU College of Health and Medicine. A surgeon, he is an expert in the care of critically injured people, and the development of high performing regional trauma systems.Professor John Hewson is Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. He is an economic and financial expert with careers in academia, business, government, media and the financial system.Professor Anna Moore is Director of the ANU Institute for Space, and Director of the Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre at Mount Stromlo Observatories in Canberra. Professor Moore was a member of the Australian government's Space Expert Reference Group that led to the formation of the Australian Space Agency in July 2018.Professor Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Helen is a public policy scholar whose work has shaped understanding of the changing nature of state-society relationships and its implications for public governance, policy and practice.Professor Michael Wesley is Professor of International Affairs and Dean of the College of Asia and the Pacific at the Australian National University. He has previously worked at the University of New South Wales and Griffith University; was Assistant Director-General for Transnational Issues at the Office of National Assessments; and Executive Director of the Lowy Institute for International Policy.Moderator :Catherine McGrath is a giant of the Australian media and a well-known Canberra identity, keynote speaker, MC, writer and businesswoman. Catherine spent 30 years reporting for the ABC and SBS in both Australia and overseas. She was political editor for both public broadcasters and was the ABC's South East Asia Correspondent based in Singapore.Policy Forum Pod is available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.This podcast extra is part of Policy Forum’s Australian Election coverage, and published in partnership with The Australian National University.
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