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Author: The Washington Post

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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.
640 Episodes
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Israeli-Palestinian violence is flaring as Israel marks the contentious Jerusalem Day holiday. What April’s job numbers mean for the future of work. And, the prom must go on. Read more:Violence erupted on Jerusalem Day, leaving at least 300 Palestinians injured. Jerusalem bureau chief Steve Hendrix reports on the escalating violence. April’s job numbers showed a dip in hiring. Economics correspondent Heather Long reports that the drop does not indicate a labor shortage, but a great reassessment of work in America. Education reporter Hannah Natanson reports on a rural Virginia high school that crossed state lines to hold a pandemic prom to remember. Post Reports has been nominated for a Peabody Award for the episode “The Life of George Floyd.” To see the full list of Peabody nominees, click here. 
How civilian oversight is undermined by politicians and police. And how economic inequality has worsened the pandemic in Venezuela.Read more:Civilian oversight agencies are touted as ways that ordinary citizens can hold police accountable. But an investigation into these agencies by reporter Nicole Dungca shows that they often fail at doing so — in part because they are undermined by law enforcement itself.Severe economic equality is worsening the coronavirus outbreak in South American countries. Anthony Faiola reports on the pandemic in Venezuela, where only the wealthy can afford care for sick loved ones.
Unfriending Trump

Unfriending Trump

2021-05-0625:594

Facebook’s Oversight Board bars Donald Trump from rejoining the site –– at least for now. How far-right extremists are recruiting new members in chat rooms and on gaming platforms. And, a farewell to empty middle seats on Delta flights.Read more:Facebook’s 20-member Oversight Board has upheld the decision to ban Donald Trump from the social media platform. Silicon Valley correspondent Elizabeth Dwoskin discusses what that means for other political leaders online.Far-right groups that blossomed during Trump’s presidency have created enduring communities online by soft-pedaling their political goals and entertaining potential recruits with the tools of pop culture. Marc Fisher reports.For a year, empty middle seats were a silver lining of pandemic air travel — but no more.Vote for Post Reports in the Webby Awards. Our episode "The Life of George Floyd" was nominated in the News & Politics podcast category.
The Justice Department is investigating police departments in Minneapolis and Louisville for misconduct. If they are in violation, what can the feds really do? And two new airlines hope to get Americans flying again.Read more:Justice Department probes will investigate police departments in Minneapolis and Louisville. Georgetown Law professor Christy Lopez has firsthand knowledge of what that kind of investigation can really accomplish.It’s been 14 years since a new airline has launched in the United States, and many have failed since then. Lee Powell reports on two entrepreneurs trying to beat the odds.Vote for Post Reports in the Webby Awards. Our episode "The Life of George Floyd" was nominated in the News & Politics podcast category.
India continues to set world records as it faces the worst surge in cases since the start of the pandemic. And, how two decades of war have reshaped Kabul.Read more:Coronavirus cases are surging across India, leading to mass cremations and a scramble for vaccines. Joanna Slater reports on the crisis.As U.S. troops formally withdraw from Afghanistan, Philip Kennicott and photographer Lorenzo Tugnoli look at how two decades of conflict have reshaped Kabul.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
The key role children played in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and why it matters today. Read more:Janice Wesley Kelsey was 16 when she faced White police officers in the Children’s Crusade of 1963 in Birmingham, Ala. The Black youths ages 7 to 17, marching peacefully in the name of civil rights, were met with billy clubs, German shepherds and fire hoses. News crews flocked to the place nicknamed “Bombingham,” and the footage helped prompt President John F. Kennedy to urge Congress to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.On the 58th anniversary of the Children’s Crusade, Post Reports producer Jordan-Marie Smith reports on the impact of the march and how its tactics are reflected in the modern civil rights movement.You can find more resources on the Children’s Crusade at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, at the National Civil Rights Museum and in the archives at Alabama Public Radio.
Today, we’re re-airing this special episode of “Post Reports,” where we tell the story of George Floyd’s life, his upbringing and how racism hobbled his ambition. Plus, an update from Floyd’s family members after the trial of Derek Chauvin.Read more:Last fall, the Post Reports staff and a team of reporters at The Post worked on an exhaustive telling of George Floyd’s life, about this one man and his family and the forces of systemic racism that shaped their experiences over the course of more than a century. This week, in the aftermath of the Chauvin trial verdict, we are re-airing this story about George Floyd, to remind people about the real three-dimensional person whose life and death were at the center of the trial. We also went back to some of the people interviewed in the original episode to find out what they think about the verdict, and how they have been processing their grief almost a year after his death. This story is part of The Washington Post’s series “George Floyd’s America.” The reporting explores the institutional and societal roadblocks Floyd encountered as a Black man from his birth in 1973 until his death, and the role systemic racism played throughout his life.  The series is based on a review of thousands of documents and more than 150 interviews with Floyd’s friends, colleagues, public officials and scholars. The picture that emerges is one that underscores how systemic racism has calcified within many of America’s institutions, creating sharply disparate outcomes in housing, education, the economy, law enforcement and health care. Read more in this Special Report from The Washington Post: George Floyd’s America.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer Credits  Reporting for this episode from Ted Muldoon. “George Floyd’s America” was reported by Arelis Hernández, Tracy Jan, Laura Meckler, Tolu Olorunnipa, Robert Samuels, Griff Witte and Cleve Wootson. This “Post Reports” episode was produced by Ted Muldoon and Linah Mohammad and edited by Maggie Penman and Martine Powers. If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
What the CDC’s updated mask guidance means for you. And, what to expect at the delayed 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Read more:The CDC says fully vaccinated Americans can go without masks outdoors, except in crowded settings. Lena H. Sun reports on how these new guidelines may change the social norms of mask-wearing.The 2020 Olympics in Tokyo are on — for now. Correspondent Rick Maese reports on how they’re being organized and how they’ll look different because of the pandemic. 
Biden’s first 100 days

Biden’s first 100 days

2021-04-2826:571

What President Biden did — and didn't do — in his first hundred days in office. And, the United States takes cautious steps toward rejoining the Iran nuclear deal.Read more:As President Biden nears 100 days in office, he can say he made good on his promise to speed up the country’s vaccination efforts. But White House reporter Cleve Wootson explains that other issues, such as immigration, haven’t been so easy for him to address.This week, Iran and the United States engage in another round of indirect negotiations to get the United States back in the Iran nuclear deal. Both countries say they want in, so what’s the holdup? National security reporter Karen DeYoung explains.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
What the initial results of the 2020 Census might mean for the political future of the country. And, how “canceled” went from a Black-culture punchline to a watchword of White grievance.  Read more:The first batch of 2020 Census results were released Monday. Tara Bahrampour explains the biggest changes, and what that will mean for the country’s politics. The theme of this year’s meeting of the Conservative Political Action Committee was “America Uncanceled.” Clyde McGrady explores the strange journey of the word canceled — from Black culture to a White grievance watchword.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
The surge in India

The surge in India

2021-04-2624:143

How India is driving the surge in global coronavirus cases. Plus, how countries are reacting to the United States’ abundance of vaccine. Read more:A devastating second wave of coronavirus is sweeping India. The country is setting daily records for case numbers, and, as Joanna Slater reports, the health-care system is buckling under the immense demand. While the few countries with high vaccination rates are seeing coronavirus numbers decrease, globally, cases are rising. Emily Rauhala reports on how nations with lower supplies are calling for policy changes to prevent wealthy countries from hoarding vaccine.Vote for Post Reports in the Webby Awards. Our episode "The Life of George Floyd" was nominated in the News & Politics podcast category.
How a protest in a North Carolina farming town sparked a national movement for environmental justice.Read more:"I can't breathe" were George Floyd's dying words under a White police officer's knee. They eerily echo what Black, Latino, Native American and other non-White environmental-justice activists have said for decades about choking pollution in their communities. Darryl Fears and Brady Dennis report on how a protest in a North Carolina farming town sparked a national movement.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
The Biden nominee who wants to shake up Amazon. And a volcanic eruption meets a pandemic.Read more:Lina Khan’s nomination hearing signals a new era of tough antitrust enforcement for the tech industry. If confirmed, she would be the youngest-ever commissioner on the Federal Trade Commission. Anthony Faiola reports on a volcanic eruption in St. Vincent that displaced thousands. Now, the island is grappling with how to keep evacuees safe as the pandemic rages on.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners - one year of unlimited access to everything the Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
Some Black Americans are reluctant to believe that Chauvin’s conviction will impact social justice on a larger scale. Biden’s backtrack on refugee admission caps. And, the legacy of Walter Mondale.Read more:Many police reform advocates throughout the country celebrated what they saw as a rare moment of accountability on Tuesday. But Arelis Hernández spoke with Black Americans who are nervous that the conviction of Derek Chauvin might buoy misguided beliefs that racial justice has been achieved in America. The Biden administration last week announced that it was going to maintain President Donald Trump’s historically low refugee admission cap. Then, it abruptly reversed itself, insisting it had been misunderstood. White House reporter Sean Sullivan digs into the backtrack and explains what it means for the migrants left waiting. Former vice president Walter Mondale died Monday. He was 93. Correspondent Dan Balz reflects on his long-lasting contributions to the vice presidency.From the archives: We all know about the death of George Floyd. But what about his life? In “The Life of George Floyd,” we tell the story of Floyd’s family, his upbringing and how racism hobbled his ambition — a story reflecting the lives of so many Americans.
Derek Chauvin is convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd. And the promise to defund the police in Minneapolis, and what happened instead.Read more:Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd. Mark Berman reports. What do communities do when police retreat? Reporter Robert Klemko explains how a Native American neighborhood in Minneapolis found itself without a police force, and what the new model of public safety that took the force’s place looks like. From the archives: We all know about the death of George Floyd. But what about his life? In “The Life of George Floyd,” we tell the story of Floyd’s family, his upbringing and how racism hobbled his ambition — a story reflecting the lives of so many Americans.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
How Indiana gun laws failed to prevent a mass shooting last week. And conflicting views on Brexit spur violence in Northern Ireland.Read more:Police say existing gun laws should have prevented a mass shooting in Indiana last week. Instead, the shooter was able to legally purchase firearms. Paulina Firozi reports. In Northern Ireland, Protestant unionists and Catholic nationalists have faced off in riots fueled by anger over Brexit trade deals. Amanda Ferguson reports from Belfast on some of the worst violence in Northern Ireland in more than a decade.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
Derek Chauvin's defense

Derek Chauvin's defense

2021-04-1624:285

Protests continue in the Minneapolis area after the police killing of Daunte Wright. And the defense rests in the Derek Chauvin murder trial. Read more:Tim Craig reports on how the suburbs of Minneapolis are dealing with fallout from the killing of Daunte Wright.On Thursday, after two days of witness and expert testimony, the defense rested its case in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, with Chauvin declining to testify. Holly Bailey reports. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
The United States imposes sweeping new sanctions against Russia. And, how former Trump allies are faring in the private job market.Read more:On Thursday, the Biden administration imposed the first significant sanctions to target the Russian economy in several years. Shane Harris reports on the administration’s effort to punish the Kremlin for a cyberespionage campaign against the United States, and for its attempts to influence the 2020 presidential election.Former Trump administration officials are struggling to find private sector jobs. Tory Newmyer reports on the former president’s allies who may be paying the price for aligning themselves with a leader mired in controversy. If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
Ending the forever war?

Ending the forever war?

2021-04-1431:142

A deadline to end the war in Afghanistan. Biden’s vision for the future of infrastructure. Plus, how Native communities are tackling vaccinations. Read more:Biden announced that the United States will withdraw all troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11, 2021. Missy Ryan explains that the decision tells us a lot about the administration’s priorities. “Nobody is going to say that the situation in Afghanistan is what anybody would have wanted in 2001 or 2011 or 2020. The government is incredibly fragile. The Taliban is very powerful, and the prospects for peace are very dubious,” she says. President Biden’s infrastructure plan calls for the federal government to take on a vast new role in funding the nation’s transportation networks, seeking to rebuild roadways and transit while battling climate change, racial injustice and traffic deaths. Transportation reporter Ian Duncan says the plan is not quite the easy bipartisan victory some may have hoped.Native Americans were vaccinated against smallpox and then pushed off their land. Reporter Dana Hedgpeth says this history has created generational trauma that tribes are working hard to counteract in their drive to vaccinate Native communities.
Correction: In a previous version of this episode, we misstated a Brooklyn Center Police Department policy about guns and tasers. According to the former police chief, tasers are kept on the non-dominant hip, and guns on the dominant hip.Why the CDC and FDA are recommending a pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Another police killing in Minnesota. And, remembering DMX.Read more:The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after six women developed extremely rare cases of blood clots. Health-care reporter Paige Winfield Cunningham explains. On Sunday, an officer of the Brooklyn Center Police Department fatally shot 20-year-old Daunte Wright during a traffic stop. Wright was unarmed. Kim Bellware reports that his death has prompted a renewed outcry over police use of force in Minneapolis, where the highly watched murder trial of Derek Chauvin is reaching its close.Earl Simmons, the rapper known as DMX, died April 9. Pop culture reporter Bethonie Butler says his contributions to rap and hip-hop are still felt today.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
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Comments (88)

Elephant Wig

happy birthday!

May 2nd
Reply

Wilfer Zuleta

I just listened to the George Floyd podcast. Thank you for the indephed commentary. The right wing media portray him as a thug and left makes no mention of how complex his life and struggles to keep it together really were. He really tried to change his life for the best but always seemed to hit a wall.

Apr 30th
Reply

Rachel He

What is it about WaPo that you make such an EXCELLENT podcast but can only get supervillains like Facebook, big pharma, etc. to sponsor the show?!? Do you have someone in sales who's just got that strategy, or can you not help it, that's who comes to you?

Apr 16th
Reply

Kathryn Ragsdale

this just reminds us how many Americans never matured past adolescents; most are white babyboomers.

Apr 5th
Reply

Rachel He

Lol this gross sponsor makes me hate them more every time I hear that guy's voice

Mar 22nd
Reply

Eli Eccles

sponsored by WHO!?

Mar 19th
Reply

Laurie Klemme

no new pronunciations? https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/english/extremist

Feb 17th
Reply

Zach Tabor

seriously? Hauwei?! how desperate are you?

Jan 16th
Reply

EMMA GRAY

The accent of the second interviewee was very unpleasant to listen to. American or British? She needs to pick an accent because her current one is very difficult to listen to.

Jan 12th
Reply (1)

N Me

DC Cops arrested some guys, I believe on a police stop which produced a warrant...when police searched their hotel rooms, caches of weapons & ammunition were found...before 1/6..they, law enforcement knew shit was going to pop off, they didn't care..in fact they were among the insurrection- ists..

Jan 11th
Reply

Elephant Wig

Not saying it is okay for Jewish people to be persecuted, but xenophobia refers to "dislike of or prejudice against people from other countries." Religion is a choice, but where you are from is not. Once again, not saying it's acceptable, but not the same as xenophobia.

Nov 20th
Reply

AB Bonnett

Does the reaction to the relative success of African countries reflect a general bias against Africa by euro pean countries and America? Contrast this reaction to the relative success of Asian countries and the lack of a similar reaction. Is the difference solely based on GDP?

Nov 18th
Reply

ML Walton

She hit the nail on the head for me when talking about trust in each other. For those of us who do believe in the science and facts and are trying diligently to stay home as much as we can, etc., it's frustrating feeling like we're the only one not doing things. 💔 It does feel a bit like 'what's like point?' in our efforts, too. It's an isolating feeling declining invites by people who aren't of that same mindset, but my husband told me there are lots of people doing what we're doing, you just don't realize it because they're not the ones inviting you do to stuff!

Nov 14th
Reply

ncooty

It's striking that we must always talk about Trump as we'd talk about an especially petulant toddler.

Nov 8th
Reply

Carol Reed

Amy Coney Barrett is not merely Catholic. She is part of a secretive, draconian, uber-right sub-group of fundamentalists who believe in a male-dominated society. How can she exercise independent judgment? Why will no one ask out loud -- what is People of Praise and how does that group color your decisions?

Sep 29th
Reply

Ciara G

I've noticed a steady dumbing down in the explanation of topics on this podcast. Give the listeners credit that we can understand things without the hosts saying "like right, totally!" and "it's not a good look!" etc. Feel like I've been listening to two teenagers.

Sep 2nd
Reply

Philly Burbs

this is so stupid..."choose to fight in a different room" good luck with that.

Jul 13th
Reply

Philly Burbs

let's face facts Biden should not be our candidate, he can't finish a sentence without a gaff. If Trump dealt with the Virus-like our allies, Biden would be losing big. never in my lifetime was the VP pick more important for both candidates. they are both old, knocking on heavens door. gone is the Biden of the Obama era. Like the Muller debacle, baby boomers keep picking each other with no regard to age because they don't see themselves as old. that's why we have no strong young leaders boomers refuse to retire despite their frailties. we are heading for a depression. We need a VP with experience that is ready if Biden can't get over the threshold demanding a BLACK WOMEN PISSES ME OFF. Biden should not be our candidate. Clayburn changed things for him because the American people were smart enough to see the truth & he lost every primary race until then. Perez rigged the primary & now we are stuck with another old man who thinks in the past & has no real plans for the future except he's better than Trump. an awful choice. VP must have experience & be qualified I don't care what sex or color they are! i am a women, a boomer, & im putting my country first, these black women need to do that too! the demand for Biden to pick a black woman under the circumstances we are in is outrageous. imagine a demand for a white woman? everyone would be freaking out. I demand Biden pick a white woman! sounds as insane as blacks demanding biden pick a black women.

Jul 10th
Reply

Diane Grillo

what a heartbreaking story! why is it that the truth about this man and how the pardon came about wasn't as public as the pardon? I watch ALOT of cable shows yet I don't remember any interviews with anyone who was there for those few days. This should become available on all the MSNBC, CNN, YOUNG TURKS ETC as a special episode so everyone in or retired from military knows the truth. He took me to that day and I felt the nervousness and now I feel anger that this ridiculous orange idiot can cause so many to suffer that he claims to have an affinity for! Well if anyone can put that interview into the Headlines it you guys. people need to hear that. Especially those in the military

Jul 4th
Reply

Mike

jaw dropping!

Jul 3rd
Reply
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