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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.
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This is a special episode of The Campaign Moment dedicated to answering the questions on everyone’s minds about what happens next now that Harris is the Democrats’ potential nominee.Senior political reporter Aaron Blake, who writes The Post's new Campaign Moment newsletter, and Colby Itkowitz, who covers voting and elections on the democracy team, sit down with Post Reports co-host Elahe Izadi. They talk about how Harris polls against Trump, what it means for her to take over a campaign that was designed for President Biden, and how the GOP is reacting to her campaign.Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and Mary Jo Murphy. Thanks also to Trinity Webster-Bass.Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
Ava Wallace, sports reporter at The Washington Post, is in France to report on the Summer Games — and eat a lot of croissants. Join her starting July 24, continuing through the entire run of the games, for several episodes a week as she captures the highs, the lows and the Paris of it all, along with other Post colleagues.Follow The Sports Moment podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music or YouTube.Sign up for The Sports Moment: Olympics Edition newsletter here.
Yesterday, President Biden announced that he would no longer be running for reelection; he also endorsed Vice President Harris to replace him as the Democratic nominee for president in November’s election. Over the past 24 hours, endorsements of Harris have been rolling in from top Democrats. Today on Post Reports, host Elahe Izadi speaks with The Washington Post’s White House bureau chief, Toluse Olorunnipa, about Biden’s decision to endorse Harris. Plus, host Martine Powers and White House reporter Cleve Wootson dive deep into Harris’s career and how she’s evolved as a politician over the years.Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff and Trinity Webster-Bass. It was mixed by Sam Bair and edited by Reena Flores, with help from Ariel Plotnick. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
On Sunday afternoon, President Biden released a statement announcing that he would stand down from seeking reelection in the 2024 presidential race. The statement came after weeks of mounting pressure from members of his party, many of whom expressed concern over his health and speculated whether he would be able to beat former president Donald Trump. Host Elahe Izadi speaks with White House reporter Tyler Pager about this monumental decision by the president and whether it puts Democrats in a better position to beat Trump. Today’s show was produced by Ariel Plotnick and Sabby Robinson. It was edited by Reena Flores and mixed by Sean Carter. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
So far, polling suggests that young voter turnout in 2024 may not match 2020’s rate. In April, only 41 percent of Black people 18 to 39 told a Washington Post-Ipsos poll that they were certain to vote this year, down from 61 percent in June 2020.The poll mirrored what Shannon Salter was seeing among her civics students, whose interest in voting had been hobbled by poverty, racism and two aging presidential candidates seemingly far removed from the world of a struggling Allentown, Pa., teen.To these students, American politics was an ego-driven, aimless mess. She had more than a month to go before the end of the term to convince her students that their participation in American democracy was worth it. She had no idea how hard a sell that would turn out to be.This story is part of our Deep Reads series, which showcases narrative journalism at The Washington Post. It was written and read by Greg Jaffe. Audio narration comes from our partners at Noa, an app offering curated audio articles.
Democrats flipped the typical convention script this week, dominating the news during the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee. Following the attempted assassination of former president Donald Trump at a rally Saturday, the GOP aimed to send a message of unity to the party faithful. In his acceptance speech, Trump initially seemed somber, telling the crowd, “I’m not supposed to be here tonight.” They chanted back, “Yes, you are.” But he quickly regained his normal campaign posture, hammering Democrats over immigration and the economy. Meanwhile, new reporting from The Post shows that Biden is hearing concerns about his fitness to lead the ticket from senior Democratic figures like former House speaker Nancy Pelosi and former president Barack Obama.Martine Powers and Aaron Blake, senior political reporter and writer of The Campaign Moment newsletter, speak with Dan Balz, the chief correspondent covering national politics, the presidency and Congress at The Post.Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff and Charla Freeland. It was edited by Reena Flores and Lucy Perkins and mixed by Sam Bair. Subscribe to The Campaign Moment newsletter here.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
In the early 1980s, the Olympic Games were on the verge of dying out. After a string of disasters, the Games had become unaffordable, politically fraught, and faced serious security concerns. Then came the spectacular 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles that reinvented the way the Olympics were run.Guest host Ted Muldoon sits down with Les Carpenter, who covers the Olympics for The Post. They break down what changed in the 1984 Games and explore if 2024 could be another turning point.Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Renita Jablonski. Thanks to Matt Rennie. Audio of the 1984 Olympic events courtesy of the ABC Sports Collection, managed by ESPN. Additional audio courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, RunnerSpace.com and Rocky Mountain PBS.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
Voyager 1 launched on Sept. 5, 1977, during the height of the space age. In the decades since, this unmanned spacecraft has ventured to the outer edges of our universe, sending back one-of-a-kind images and exploring realms that humans will probably never reach. Voyager 1 is now more than 15 billion miles away in interstellar space, still collecting data and sending it back to Earth. But late last year, Voyager 1 faced its biggest crisis yet. It went silent and stopped communicating. In the months that followed, scientists at NASA launched an all-hands-on-deck effort to find a solution.  Today on “Post Reports,” science reporter Joel Achenbach on Voyager’s journey through space, its fragile future and the desperate effort to keep it with us. We hear from Linda Spilker, project scientist for Voyager 1, and David Cummings, a member of a “tiger team” at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.   Today’s show was produced by Elana Gordon. It was edited by Peter Bresnan and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Stephen Smith.  Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
On Saturday, Thomas Matthew Crooks attempted to assassinate former president Donald Trump. Crooks got on top of a roof near the Butler, Pa., rally and shot toward the rally stage. But almost a minute and a half before Crooks fired, bystanders alerted security that they saw a man on a roof.Since the assassination attempt, the Secret Service – the organization meant to protect current and former presidents – has been under scrutiny. Today, guest host Chris Velazco speaks with investigative reporter Carol Leonnig about the Secret Service – how they work, their past failures and how they responded at the scene. Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson and Ali Bianco. It was edited by Reena Flores and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Peter Wallsten and Isaac Stanley-Becker.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
This week, amid calls for political unity and growing questions over presidential security, Trump faces one of the most consequential weeks in his campaign yet – the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee, where he will officially accept the Republican nomination for president. Post Reports co-host Martine Powers speaks with senior political reporter Aaron Blake and political investigations and enterprise reporter Josh Dawsey from the convention. They explore the weight of the ongoing investigation into the attempted assassination, its larger implications and what to expect from the convention this week. Also, they discuss the dropped charges in a legal challenge regarding Trump’s handling of classified documents, and the announcement of Trump’s running mate: Sen. J.D. Vance of Ohio.Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff and Charla Freeland, and mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and Mary Jo Murphy. Thanks also to Ali Bianco.Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
A shooter fired multiple rounds toward the stage at a Saturday campaign rally for former president Donald Trump. Federal officials are investigating the incident as an assassination attempt.Read more:Donald Trump, the former president who is set to formally accept the Republican nomination later this week, was less than 10 minutes into his speech at a rally in Pennsylvania when a burst of gunfire interrupted him. Trump was quickly rushed offstage with what appeared to be blood on one side of his face. He later said in a TruthSocial post that he was shot in his upper right ear. Authorities are investigating the event as an assassination attempt. According to law enforcement, the shooter and one spectator are dead and at least two others are critically injured.National political reporter Isaac Arnsdorf was at the Trump rally in Butler, Pennsylvania and witnessed the shooting unfold. He spoke with host Martine Powers late Saturday night, recounted his experience and shared the latest details of what we know so far. Martine also spoke with Post photographer Jabin Botsford who was a few feet from Trump when the gunfire began and a Trump supporter who attended the rally.Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon, with production assistance from Rennie Svirnovskiy. It was edited by Reena Flores and Renita Jablonski. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
This week, Biden vowed in his high-stakes press conference on Thursday night to remain in the race, but it’s unclear if his message satisfied voters. His speech followed new polling this week that suggests that more than half of Democrats want Biden to drop out of the race. It also found that the overall race hasn’t changed much, and that Trump and Biden are locked in a dead heat. Post Reports co-host Martine Powers talks with senior political reporter Aaron Blake and national politics reporter Hannah Knowles about how Democratic voters and politicians feel about Biden, and why Trump has been so quiet during a tumultuous moment in his opponent’s campaign. They also dig into what to expect at next week’s Republican National Convention in Milwaukee. Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and Mary Jo Murphy and mixed by Rennie Svirnovskiy. Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
Wimbledon. Hit films like “Challengers.” Tennis core. While household names such as Serena Williams and Roger Federer have retired from the game, a new generation of players is on the rise. They are fueling a resurgence in the sport’s popularity and pushing for long-awaited pay equity. Today on “Post Reports,” Martine Powers speaks with sports reporter Ava Wallace from Wimbledon about this tennis moment and the new players to watch, such as Carlos Alcaraz, Lorenzo Musetti, Iga Swiatek and Coco Gauff, and the challenge the sport is facing from pickleball. Wallace also offers her viewing tips as Wimbledon heads to its final matches.  Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Monica Campbell. Thanks to Greg Schimmel. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
Summer is in full swing, and that means many Americans are taking long-awaited vacations. While the joys of exploring new places or visiting family and friends are numerous, the chaos that comes with summer travel –such as  flight delays, disappointing Airbnbs and turbulence – can be enough to make us all want to stay home.Host Martine Powers speaks with Post travel reporter Natalie Compton about how to survive the mayhem of summer travel.Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson. It was edited by Ariel Plotnick and mixed by Sean Carter. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
As of Tuesday afternoon, nine congressional House Democrats have called on President Biden to step aside. At the same time, influential liberals like Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer and New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have publicly announced their support for Biden’s candidacy. Biden himself has been defiant about remaining in the race. Today on “Post Reports,” host Martine Powers talks to White House reporter Yasmeen Abutaleb about the schism inside the Democratic Party and why this week is so pivotal for the future of the Biden campaign. Today’s show was produced by Peter Bresnan and Elana Gordon. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and Monica Campbell and mixed by Sean Carter. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
Last week, France was preparing for the possibility of its first far-right government since World War II. Now, it faces a political crossroads, just weeks before the Olympics kick off in Paris.French President Emmanuel Macron shocked the nation last month when he dissolved Parliament and announced snap elections, hoping to win more seats for his centrist party. But after the first round of elections last week, Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Rally made historic gains and seemed poised to secure a large victory in the runoff. Instead, the leftist Popular Front came out on top in Sunday night’s elections after forming an alliance with Macron’s centrists. However, no party secured an absolute majority of seats, leaving the country uncertain of what party will lead it.Today on “Post Reports,” host Martine Powers speaks with international correspondent Rick Noack about what these election results spell for France’s long-term future and global standing, and how that might impact Paris’s readiness to host the 2024 Summer Olympics. Today’s show was produced by Ariel Plotnick and Ali Bianco. It was edited by Ted Muldoon and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Marisa Bellack.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
With the 60th anniversary of the march from Selma to Montgomery approaching next year, Philip Howard wants to ensure that visitors to Alabama receive a more robust truth, one that goes beyond a paragraph written on a historical marker.Howard conceived an ambitious goal to tell a cohesive, robust story about the Selma-to-Montgomery march. The march was mostly known for its beginnings, when officers beat and bloodied protesters walking over the Edmund Pettus Bridge. But few delved into the details that made the third attempt to cross the bridge successful, including the families and organizations that helped along the way. There were four “campsites” where protesters stayed overnight while completing their 54-mile sojourn. Persuading the families who owned these campsites to publicly preserve their history would be a journey of its own.This story is part of our Deep Reads series, which showcases narrative journalism at The Washington Post. It was written and read by Robert Samuels. Audio production and original music composition by Bishop Sand.
Learn how to enjoy cooking by identifying parts of your personality outside the kitchen that will set you up for success inside the kitchen.In the first class in our course on how to enjoy cooking more, host Cristina Quinn teams up with the Washington Post food team to uncover tips for identifying your kitchen personality. Food and dining editor Joe Yonan, food writer and recipe developer Aaron Hutcherson and recipes editor Becky Krystal discuss how to apply personality characteristics — like a tendency to tinker or an adherence to rules — to your cooking experience. The process can make preparing a meal more personalized and therefore more pleasurable.Find more than 10,000 recipes – sortable by cuisine, course and time it takes to cook – in The Post’s recipe finder. Try one of Cristina’s favorites, Simple Butter Chicken.Subscribe to The Washington Post for just 50 cents per week for your first year. (Sale ends July 10). Connect your subscription in Apple Podcasts.To hear more, check out “Try This” wherever you listen to podcasts.
From Theresa May, who struggled to connect with the public, to Boris Johnson, whose tenure was marred by scandals, to Liz Truss, who served as prime minister for just 45 days, the Conservative Party has had significant challenges with U.K. voters in recent years. With economic turmoil following Brexit, a pressing need for better health care, and concerns about job security, many British voters are seeking a fresh start. Tomorrow, Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and his Conservative Party will face voters in the first general election since 2019. Projections for Thursday’s general election show the opposition Labour Party, led by Keir Starmer, on the precipice of a parliamentary supermajority win.  Today on “Post Reports,” host Martine Powers speaks with The Washington Post’s London bureau chief Bill Booth about the decline of the Conservative Party and the contenders vying to be the next British prime minister. Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks also to Trinity Webster-Bass and Ali Bianco.To learn more about the election, check out our colleague Ishaan Tharoor’s column.Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
It’s not Friday, but here’s a special Tuesday edition of The Campaign Moment — our weekly roundtable conversation to help you keep track of the biggest developments of the 2024 campaign.We’re bringing you an episode early in the week to share details from inside President Biden’s campaign as the Democratic Party reckons with the fallout from his stumbling performance at the first presidential debate. Senior political reporter Aaron Blake, who writes The Washington Post's “The Campaign Moment” newsletter, and Tyler Pager, a White House reporter who’s been traveling with Biden around the country, sit down with co-host Martine Powers. They reveal the behind-the-scenes details of Biden’s preparation before the debate, his Friday campaign rally to reinvigorate the president’s image, and his team’s willingness to engage in discussions about replacing him ahead of the Democratic convention.Today’s show was produced by Laura Benshoff and mixed by Sean Carter. Additional production by Ali Bianco. It was edited by Allison Michaels and Mary Jo Murphy.  Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.
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Comments (159)

Joshua Steelflex

it came off to me as kind of nasty to repeatedly call the young lady "naive" and call her effort "performative". What was the point? And why call her videos boring -- that was unnecessary. It feels like this might have been influenced by her choice to not continue corresponding with the Post,.

Mar 27th
Reply

albus

It's not in solidarity with Hamas, it's in solidarity with Palestinians. It's about stopping the horrific genocide!

Feb 6th
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Andi-Roo Libecap

Relationships aren't science. It's ridiculous to claim the ideas in Chapman's book aren't scientifically sound. Any couple who uses Love Languages to work on their relationship is bound to find a measure of success; the point is the work itself. The book is almost (almost) beside the point: When partners have open, trusting communication and are safe to voice their wants and needs; and when partners decide to give more of that to each other; how could there NOT be success?

Jan 27th
Reply

Gina Ruzicka

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Jan 18th
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Gina Ruzicka

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Jan 18th
Reply

Paul Rhine

It's a bit ironic that I get a bourbon advertisement during this episode.

Dec 3rd
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Eric Everitt

Guilt Crusading

Oct 12th
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Hobi

How can u justify her, him speech?! How can authenticate their words?! How can u say that with a strong certainty?! I don't deny the awful condition that we have to deal with in Iran, but there are absolutely a lot if thing to defend and frankly these days everyone just wants to take advantages of the situation which they are in, and i bet ur not an exception ((: I don't mean every single word which I've just typed, is exactly correct, but for godness sake don't believe everything u have just hear in these podcasts(;

Sep 23rd
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Andrea

I think a teacher providing all perspectives to our children is amazing! Children don't need to have the same beliefs as their parents. Some kids might never know other perspectives without people like Mary. I believe its also important to have an idea of where other people might be coming from and what they are thinking. People should be able to see other points of view without being offended. Learning other points of view doesn't mean they have to be our own. Knowledge is knowledge.

Sep 19th
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Ryan Pena

hilarious that just a few years ago conservatives were making fun of lib college students complaining that conservative speakers couldn't speak on campus and now they're the ones whining and complaining about learning about different POVs. snowflakes

Sep 15th
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AH

interesting story

Aug 17th
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Hobi

Omg... This truly should have been a blessing from god to listen to this podcast 🥺😭🤌🏻 The combination of nature, environment, birds and the connection to our wellness 😭

Jun 26th
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Rosalie Steame

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Apr 9th
Reply

Nick Chernick

I recently purchased men's cologne as a gift for a friend on a website, and the process could not have been easier. I started by browsing through their selection of scents and was able to narrow it down to a few options. The website offered gift wrapping and a personal message, which was a nice touch. Checkout was quick and I appreciated that Desiner brands https://inlower.com/mens-perfume-sale they offered the option to ship the gift directly to my friend's address. The cologne arrived on time and my friend loved it. I would definitely use this website again for future gifts.

Mar 22nd
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Darcie Harris

I would expect a higher standard from the Post. Polling does NOT say people "think Biden hasn't done much." Polling indicates people think he's too old. And your reporter should know better than to repeatedly use the phrase, "and all of that stuff." Please, rise to a higher standard.

Feb 6th
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Eric Everitt

okay.. this is beyond not mentioning.. start focusing on male issues for a change. like we are half the damn population after all. I have a son, and the female bias is depressing.

Oct 1st
Reply (1)

Norma Byron

The fault and the shame goes to the shoddy handling within the State Department for America's exit from Afghanistan. The exit should have started in April in an orderly fashion to avoid the needless agony, suffering and death of many.

Aug 27th
Reply

AH

Can we all stop using the word "unprecedented"?

Aug 10th
Reply

Kevin Rooney

hey kk do dad d dad m km 0000ll

Jul 30th
Reply

Andrea

If "returning to normal" means hungry kids, why would anyone want that?

Jul 24th
Reply (1)
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