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Author: The Washington Post

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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.
670 Episodes
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The legacy of a bombing

The legacy of a bombing

2021-06-2225:411

In Oklahoma City, the 1995 bombing offers lessons — and warnings — for today’s fight against extremism. Plus, what a Supreme Court ruling means for the NCAA.Read more:Reporter Hannah Allam was in high school in Oklahoma City when Timothy McVeigh altered the skyline of her city for good. She remembers her classmates speculating about what could possibly have rattled their school building so intensely — maybe an accident in the chemistry lab? A sonic boom? Twenty-six years later, Hannah found her way back to her hometown, to see what lessons – if any – local lawmakers, survivors and activists were bringing to today’s conversations about far-right domestic terrorism.On Monday, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled against the NCAA’s limits on education-related perks for college athletes. Columnist Jerry Brewer explains what that means for the NCAA going forward. We are thrilled to announce that Post Reports was honored with a Peabody Award for our episode “The Life of George Floyd.” Check out the video of Trevor Noah presenting the award, as well as our acceptance speech. If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners - one year of unlimited access to everything the Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe. 
Biden’s Catholicism

Biden’s Catholicism

2021-06-2125:541

President Biden is a lifelong Catholic, but because he supports abortion access, some U.S. bishops believe he shouldn't take Communion. A grim discovery is spurring a reckoning in Canada. Plus, how donating breast milk can help grieving mothers heal.Read more:U.S. Catholic bishops voted last week to back a measure that would limit Communion for Catholic politicians who support abortion rights, including President Biden. Religion reporter Michelle Boorstein explains the significance of this move and what the controversy says about the state of the Catholic community in the United States.The remains of 215 Indigenous children were uncovered on the grounds of a former residential school in British Columbia. Amanda Coletta describes the history behind the disturbing discovery and how Indigenous people have been responding to it.A growing community of women who have stillbirths are donating their breast milk to families in need. Miriam Foley reports.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
Historian Annette Gordon-Reed discusses the meaning and history behind Juneteenth, the holiday that has come to symbolize the end of slavery in the United States.Read more:Juneteenth is officially a national holiday. This week, Congress rushed to pass a bill officially recognizing June 19, commemorating the day in 1865 when enslaved people in Texas were finally informed that they had been freed two years earlier by the Emancipation Proclamation. Historian Annette Gordon-Reed grew up celebrating Juneteenth with her family and community in Texas. While the holiday started in the Lone Star state in 1866, it has grown in scope and prominence with celebrations across the country. In this episode, we talk with Gordon-Reed about her experience growing up in Texas, Black Americans’ lives during and after slavery, and the growing significance behind this historic holiday. Gordon-Reed is the author of a new book, “On Juneteenth.” We also recommend you check out a new podcast at The Post called “Please, Go On.” It’s hosted by James Hohmann from the Opinions desk. This week on the show, Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs says the federal government needs to step in to protect voting rights. Listen to the episode here.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go towashingtonpost.com/subscribe.
The Fed says inflation could climb higher than projected — but many of the price hikes could be short-lived. How to navigate the many new spending opportunities the end of the pandemic has brought. Plus, the power of this year’s graduation speeches.Read more:New projections from the Federal Reserve suggest that prices will keep climbing this year. But what does that tell us about economic recovery from the pandemic moving forward? Rachel Siegel explains the Fed’s current approach: Wait and see.If the return of eating out or traveling has left you burning through savings or reluctantly sitting out, personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary is here to help. Check out her new book, “What to Do with Your Money When Crisis Hits: A Survival Guide.”High school graduation is always a big moment — but this year some seniors are taking the opportunity to advocate what they believe in from the graduation stage.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
The Biden-Putin summit

The Biden-Putin summit

2021-06-1628:112

What Biden’s summit with Putin can tell us about the future of U.S.-Russia relations. And, what could happen to struggling tenants when the rent comes due in July. Read more:President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin lauded their Wednesday summit as “positive” and “constructive” — but politics reporter Eugene Scott says their back-to-back news conferences made clear that the two leaders remain at odds. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s eviction moratorium is up at the end of June, leaving many renters at risk of eviction. Kyle Swenson reports on why rent relief hasn’t made it to many who need it and how some tenants are getting by.If you’re enjoying this podcast and you’d like to support the reporting that makes it possible, please consider subscribing to The Washington Post. A subscription gets you unlimited access to all the journalism we publish, from breaking news to deep investigations to baking tips. Subscriptions also directly support this show, and the work of Washington Post journalists around the world. Right now, podcast listeners can get one year of unlimited access to The Post for just $29. That’s less than one dollar a week. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3zkogmc
Some businesses ask whether higher wages could be the answer to the labor shortage. Members of Congress return to the Capitol, and all its security concerns. And a new era of space travel dawns — for those who can afford it.Read more:Across the country, businesses have a problem: Workers aren’t taking low-wage jobs. Economics reporter Eli Rosenberg talked to employers who think they have found a solution: paying people more.Before returning to their home states last month, some lawmakers expressed concerns over safety and sought out funding for additional security. Now, House members have returned to the Hill, where they don’t necessarily feel much safer. Marianna Sotomayor reports. A new kind of space race: Billionaires are competing to launch into space. Others can come along — but only if they can afford astronomical prices. Space travel reporter Christian Davenport has more.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything the Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
An insular Christian group faces a reckoning over sexual misconduct. And, the extraordinary effort from educators to get kids back to school.Read more:Last fall, the Christian group People of Praise garnered national attention after a prominent member, Amy Coney Barrett, was nominated to the Supreme Court. Soon after, former members began a Facebook group called “PoP Survivors.” Investigative journalist Beth Reinhard reports on some of those former members who say they were sexually abused by other members of the group when they were children. Schools across the country are trying to persuade parents to send their kids back to in-person learning in the fall. Reporter Hannah Natanson follows an elementary school principal as she goes door-to-door to reassure hesitant families.If you’re enjoying this podcast and you’d like to support the reporting behind it, please consider a subscription to The Washington Post. A subscription gets you unlimited access to everything we publish, from breaking news to baking tips. It also directly supports this show, and the work of Washington Post journalists around the world who are working to uncover the next big story.Right now, podcast listeners can get one year of unlimited access to The Post for just $29. That’s less than one dollar a week. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3zkogmc
An introduction to The Post’s new opinion podcast: “Please, Go On,” with columnist James Hohmann and his first guest, Vice President Harris. And, cartoonist Alison Bechdel shares the secret to superhuman strength.Read more:The Post’s new opinion podcast launches today: “Please, Go On,” with host James Hohmann. In the first episode, James talks to Vice President Harris about the exodus of women from the workforce during the pandemic. This week we’re kicking off our Summer Fridays series, where we’ll explore arts and culture and topics beyond the news. For the first installment, we talk to cartoonist Alison Bechdel about her new book “The Secret to Superhuman Strength,” which explores her lifelong love affair with fitness — and how she realized that superhuman strength isn’t really about muscles at all.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
Washington’s X-Files

Washington’s X-Files

2021-06-1032:413

The serious government search for UFOs. What the death of Keystone XL could mean for Big Oil. And, what we know about how covid affects the brain. Read more:Are we alone in the universe? The U.S. government has been investigating that question for years. Reporter Jacqueline Alemany on the serious search for UFOs. The company behind the Keystone XL pipeline is shutting down the project after years of lawsuits and public blowback. Juliet Eilperin reports.Scientists are still trying to understand how the coronavirus affects the brain. Frances Stead Sellers reports.
‘Do not come.’

‘Do not come.’

2021-06-0928:174

Vice President Harris delivers a blunt warning against crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. How the tax returns of the richest Americans are spurring talk of a wealth tax. And, the renewed popularity of Crocs during the pandemic. Read more: In her first international trip as vice president, Kamala D. Harris attempted to thread a delicate needle on immigration: remaining stern on border crossings while offering incentives to would-be migrants to remain in Central America. Reporter Nick Miroff examines Harris’s two-day tour through Guatemala and Mexico and how the visit aimed to address the root causes of mass migration. What are the wealthiest Americans paying in income taxes? According to Post finance reporter Todd Frankel, a new report from ProPublica reveals a startling answer - and breathes new life into calls for a wealth tax. Retail reporter Abha Bhattarai and Post Reports producer Jordan-Marie Smith explore the pandemic popularity boost experienced by everyone’s favorite ugly shoe: Crocs.
The Justice Department strikes back against hackers who carried out a lucrative ransomware attack last month. And what President Biden hopes to get out of his meeting with the Group of Seven.Read more:In May, hackers extorted millions of dollars in bitcoin from Colonial Pipeline through a ransomware attack. Now, the Justice Department has broken into the hackers’ virtual wallet, effectively wiping out their profits from the scheme. Cybersecurity reporter Joseph Marks takes us through the cat-and-mouse game.The first foreign trip of Biden’s presidency will take him to Britain to meet with leaders of the Group of Seven nations. As columnist Ishaan Tharoor explains, the allies are hoping to have a smooth — even boring — gathering now that Donald Trump is no longer in attendance.
Manchin on a mission

Manchin on a mission

2021-06-0729:222

Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) says he will not support his party’s voting rights bill. The coronavirus pandemic’s devastating impact on Latin America’s middle class. And, the White House partners with dating apps to promote vaccinations. Read more:Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) has broken from his party once again to reject a broad voting rights bill. Congressional reporter Mike DeBonis has more on what this means for the rest of the Democrats’ priorities. In Latin America, a previously burgeoning middle class has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic. Anthony Faiola reports from Columbia on the disproportionate impact that rising poverty and inequality have had on Afro Latinos.And, a group of dating sites has teamed up with the White House on an initiative to allow users to indicate whether they’ve been vaccinated against the coronavirus. Marisa Iati reports.
Is baseball broken?

Is baseball broken?

2021-06-0421:071

Baseball is back, and almost normal — which means the sport is once again plagued with lots of problems that predate the pandemic. Today, we explore the fastball, the nonstop no hitters, and what’s wrong with baseball.Read more:There’s a growing trend in baseball — and it could be the downfall of America’s favorite pastime. We revisit a past episode with sports reporter Dave Sheinin on how high-velocity pitches are now dominating the sport. “What's being lost in baseball is the nuance, and it’s always been a game of nuance,” Dave says. “You're losing things like the stolen base, the bunt, the hit and run play. A lot of strategy and nuance is lost from the game when all it is is power versus power.”Major League Baseball’s offensive woes are complicated, and they don’t appear to be going away. National baseball reporter Chelsea Janes explains what might be going on, and what MLB might try to do about it.
Bye-bye, Bibi?

Bye-bye, Bibi?

2021-06-0331:031

What it’ll take to replace Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Why we’ll probably all need a coronavirus booster shot. And what makes Olivia Rodrigo’s “Sour” resonate across generations.Read more:An unlikely alliance of opposition lawmakers announced on Wednesday that they had come to a power-sharing deal that would oust longtime Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Steve Hendrix reports on what this major political shift would mean for the future of the country.Vaccine developers are beginning to test coronavirus vaccine booster shots. Science reporter Carolyn Johnson on why we'll probably need them.Olivia Rodrigo’s new album “Sour” shot to the top of Billboard’s 200 albums chart. Pop culture reporter Sonia Rao digs into the singer’s cross-generation appeal.
The fight over voting rights in the United States. How one historian is thinking about the George Floyd protests a year later. And, what the HIPAA federal privacy law says about vaccination records.Read more:On Sunday night, Texas Democrats staged a dramatic walkout to block a restrictive voting bill from passing — but as Amy Gardner reports, this is far from the end of the battle over voting rights in the United States.It’s been a year since the killing of George Floyd sparked a global uprising against police brutality and systemic racism. In her book “America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s,” historian Elizabeth Hinton connects the Black Lives Matter protests to a long history of Black rebellions in response to police violence. As more Americans get vaccinated, misinformation is spreading about whether requiring proof of vaccination is a violation of the HIPAA federal privacy law. Allyson Chiu explains who can ask for your vaccination status and whether you have to tell them.
Fauci’s inbox

Fauci’s inbox

2021-06-0121:072

What we can learn from Fauci’s emails. Why tennis star Naomi Osaka withdrew from the French Open. And, the joyous sounds of Americans reuniting.Read more:The Post recently obtained 866 pages of Anthony Fauci’s emails from March and April of 2020. Yasmeen Abutaleb and Damian Paletta report on the correspondence behind some of the most frantic days of the coronavirus crisis.Naomi Osaka is the second-ranked tennis player in the world. After a back-and-forth about whether she would be required to speak with the media at the French Open, she withdrew from the tournament. Sports reporter Ben Strauss says the episode raises questions about athletes' mental health and the utility of sports journalism.For more than a year, families and friends have been kept apart because of the coronavirus pandemic. Now, as more and more people get vaccinated, loved ones are finally reuniting. If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer. 
On cicada time

On cicada time

2021-05-2828:513

Love them or loathe them, the cicadas of Brood X are here. One Washington Post editor recalls his first taste of the bug. A Smithsonian entomologist demystifies the science of Brood X. And a biologist takes us on a journey through cicadas’ deep past.Read more:When the cicadas of Brood X last emerged, the world was a different place. George W. Bush was president. “Shrek 2” topped the box office. And Cameron Barr, lately the interim leader of The Washington Post, was a general-assignment reporter tasked with sampling frozen cicadas sauteed in butter and parsley.Smithsonian entomologist Floyd Shockley has long loved periodical cicadas. He takes us on a tour behind the scenes at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, which houses cabinets full of preserved insects. There we learn about cicadas’ elegant bodies — and the mysterious way they count the passage of the years.And finally, biologist Gene Kritsky takes us back many, many emergences to the time when cicadas serenaded the dinosaurs.Entomologists want your help documenting Brood X for their Cicada Safari project. If you would like to contribute photos or videos of cicadas, download the Cicada Safari app or go to cicadasafari.org.
Top health officials say they can’t rule out the possibility that the coronavirus leaked from a lab in China. For many Indian Americans, the covid crisis in India is close to home. And Texas enacts the strictest abortion law yet.Read more:We still don’t know the origin of the coronavirus pandemic. President Biden is asking the intelligence community to redouble their investigation into one theory: that the virus leaked from a Wuhan laboratory. Shane Harris reports.Even as the United States gets the pandemic under control, Indian Americans are watching as loved ones suffer through India’s devastating surge. Fenit Nirappil reports on Indian American doctors scrambling to help from afar.And Texas’ new law will ban abortions before many people realize they’re pregnant. OB/GYN Jen Gunter explains the science.If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
Decisions, decisions

Decisions, decisions

2021-05-2628:482

What it’s like to cover the Supreme Court, year after year. And, the not-so-secret life of audio producers.Read more:Longtime Supreme Court reporter Robert Barnes on how he prepares for the decision season each year, and what he’ll be watching out for this month. What exactly does it mean to “produce” a podcast? After a listener asked the question, the Post Reports team started thinking: What if we pulled back the curtain on our process? Producer Bishop Sand and editor Alexis Diao give a behind-the-scenes look at what it means to be a producer on the show.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
What a forced plane landing in Belarus could mean for state sovereignty and press freedom. And, how some Americans are dealing with accent bias.Read more:On Sunday, Belarusian authorities forced the landing of a commercial flight carrying travelers from Athens to Lithuania, mere minutes before its final descent. Michael Birnbaum reports on President Alexander Lukashenko’s goals in downing the flight, and the international response to the arrest of a dissident journalist on board. Accent bias is a subtle but insidious form of discrimination. But as some Americans seek to get ahead in their careers by taking accent modification courses, others are asking whether they should have to change their accents to get ahead. Rachel Hatzipanagos reports. Today is the anniversary of George Floyd’s death. In our episode, “The Life of George Floyd,” we hear about Floyd’s family, his upbringing and how racism hobbled his ambition — a story that reflects the lives of many Americans.
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Comments (91)

Terri Hunt

Loved the explanation on what a producer does to make a podcast! Very informative peek "under the covers". Thank You!

May 29th
Reply

Elephant Wig

Obviously randy was a bad person but did she burn down his house?

May 28th
Reply

Philly Burbs

these people make very little money. I foress a lot quitting. it's just not worth it. u expect someone to stand alone at a drop box & be picked off one at a time? give me a break.

May 15th
Reply

Elephant Wig

happy birthday!

May 2nd
Reply

Wilfer Zuleta

I just listened to the George Floyd podcast. Thank you for the indephed commentary. The right wing media portray him as a thug and left makes no mention of how complex his life and struggles to keep it together really were. He really tried to change his life for the best but always seemed to hit a wall.

Apr 30th
Reply

Rachel He

What is it about WaPo that you make such an EXCELLENT podcast but can only get supervillains like Facebook, big pharma, etc. to sponsor the show?!? Do you have someone in sales who's just got that strategy, or can you not help it, that's who comes to you?

Apr 16th
Reply

Kathryn Ragsdale

this just reminds us how many Americans never matured past adolescents; most are white babyboomers.

Apr 5th
Reply

Rachel He

Lol this gross sponsor makes me hate them more every time I hear that guy's voice

Mar 22nd
Reply

Eli Eccles

sponsored by WHO!?

Mar 19th
Reply

Laurie Klemme

no new pronunciations? https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/english/extremist

Feb 17th
Reply

Zach Tabor

seriously? Hauwei?! how desperate are you?

Jan 16th
Reply

EMMA GRAY

The accent of the second interviewee was very unpleasant to listen to. American or British? She needs to pick an accent because her current one is very difficult to listen to.

Jan 12th
Reply (1)

N Me

DC Cops arrested some guys, I believe on a police stop which produced a warrant...when police searched their hotel rooms, caches of weapons & ammunition were found...before 1/6..they, law enforcement knew shit was going to pop off, they didn't care..in fact they were among the insurrection- ists..

Jan 11th
Reply

Elephant Wig

Not saying it is okay for Jewish people to be persecuted, but xenophobia refers to "dislike of or prejudice against people from other countries." Religion is a choice, but where you are from is not. Once again, not saying it's acceptable, but not the same as xenophobia.

Nov 20th
Reply

AB Bonnett

Does the reaction to the relative success of African countries reflect a general bias against Africa by euro pean countries and America? Contrast this reaction to the relative success of Asian countries and the lack of a similar reaction. Is the difference solely based on GDP?

Nov 18th
Reply

ML Walton

She hit the nail on the head for me when talking about trust in each other. For those of us who do believe in the science and facts and are trying diligently to stay home as much as we can, etc., it's frustrating feeling like we're the only one not doing things. 💔 It does feel a bit like 'what's like point?' in our efforts, too. It's an isolating feeling declining invites by people who aren't of that same mindset, but my husband told me there are lots of people doing what we're doing, you just don't realize it because they're not the ones inviting you do to stuff!

Nov 14th
Reply

ncooty

It's striking that we must always talk about Trump as we'd talk about an especially petulant toddler.

Nov 8th
Reply

Carol Reed

Amy Coney Barrett is not merely Catholic. She is part of a secretive, draconian, uber-right sub-group of fundamentalists who believe in a male-dominated society. How can she exercise independent judgment? Why will no one ask out loud -- what is People of Praise and how does that group color your decisions?

Sep 29th
Reply

Ciara G

I've noticed a steady dumbing down in the explanation of topics on this podcast. Give the listeners credit that we can understand things without the hosts saying "like right, totally!" and "it's not a good look!" etc. Feel like I've been listening to two teenagers.

Sep 2nd
Reply

Philly Burbs

this is so stupid..."choose to fight in a different room" good luck with that.

Jul 13th
Reply
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