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Postmodern Realities Podcast

Author: Hank Hanegraaff

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Hosted by Melanie Cogdill the Managing Editor at the Christian Research Institute, Postmodern Realities is a podcast from the Christian Research Institute and the CHRISTIAN RESEARCH JOURNAL. Each podcast features in-depth conversations with our JOURNAL authors.
205 Episodes
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Film director Christopher Nolan’s unwritten thoughts are like sculptures and aim less at recreating life as much as creating Escher-like puzzle boxes that are utterly unlike almost anything we experience in reality. Nolan is the consummate trickster, aiming to use the full power of cinema to beguile audiences with the cleverness of his construction projects. His newest film Tenet, now in some theaters nationwide, is perhaps the knottiest of his puzzle boxes.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Philip Tallon about his online-exclusive article, “Time May Change Me, But I Can’t Change Time: Reversing Time to Understand Christopher Nolan’s Tenet.” https://www.equip.org/article/time-may-change-me-but-i-cant-change-time-reversing-time-to-understand-christopher-nolans-tenet/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 173 Jesus Wake Up!Episode 200 Wisdom for College ZoomersWisdom for College ZoomersA Hidden LifeEpisode 155 The Marathon of Martyrdom: A Review of A Hidden LifeThe Marathon of Martyrdom: A Review of A Hidden LifeStar Wars: Rise of Skywalker Episode 154: The Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerThe Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerFred Rogers and Mr. Rogers Neighborhood: Episode 150: The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”Steven Spielberg Movies: Episode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanClear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanTolkien Review:Episode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienAlfred Hitchcock films:Episode 100: A. Hitchcock FilmsThe Coen Brother’s Films:Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence“O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of ExistenceThe Films of Quentin Tarantino:Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino“Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantino’s Premodern Theology Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
The Enneagram, a personality system configured around a circle of nine types, promises to help the spiritual seeker break free from sin, peel back layers of dysfunctional ways of thinking, and find inside him or herself the essential, God-given gem. The nine numbers are grouped by three—those of the head, those of the heart, and those of the gut. Each number is associated with a particular sin and takes on the characteristics of the numbers on either side, the wings. New Age spiritualist Claudio Naranjo, joined the Enneagram to modern-day psychological practice, and from there, through Priest Richard Rohr, who borrows from Jungian conceptions of spirituality, it made its way into the Roman Catholic church in the 1980s. The Enneagram is now sweeping through mainstream Evangelicalism so Christians might be curious about both its origins and its view of the human person. Claiming it arose in the ancient Christian past, Richard Rohr, Ian Cron, and others have, unwittingly, adopted a gnostic view of the person, one which requires special self-knowledge. The New Age Roots and the misuses of Scripture—particularly in regards to the theological definition of sin—should give those seeking personal transformation through use of the Enneagram pause. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her online-exclusive article, “The Road Back to Where? A Look at Self Discovery Using the Enneagram”. https://www.equip.org/article/the-road-back-to-where-a-look-at-self-discovery-using-the-enneagram/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 198 Cancel Culture and the Gospel: Where Can You Go When The Whole World Is Against You?Cancel Culture and the Gospel: Where Can You Go When The Whole World Is Against You?Episode 193 Catching UP with Rachel Hollis, Glennon Doyle & Jen HatmakerEpisode 191 Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedGods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
While thoughtful Christians should have many places where they disagree with the Black Lives Matter organization; the simple statement “black lives matter” should be non-controversial for Christians for it is theologically certain. God’s Word tells us that “black lives matter” when it reveals to us that all human beings are made in the image/likeness of God (see Gen 1:26-27, 9:6, Jas 3:9). While it is good for our culture to wrestle with the question “are black lives really being valued when it comes to the use of deadly force by police against black citizens,” a far greater danger against black lives is going unnoticed and often unprotested by the black community—the danger posed to black lives via abortion. The most dangerous place to be black in America is not in a car pulled over by a police officer; nor is it in the “hood” of some major American city. The most dangerous place to be black in America is inside a mother’s womb. Until black lives matter in the womb, they don’t truly matter in America.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Aaron Turner about his online-exclusive article, “Black Lives Matter Inside The Womb And Out”. https://www.equip.org/article/black-lives-matter-inside-the-womb-and-out/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 175 Yeezy Comes to Jesus: Considering Kayne West’s Profession and Promotion of the Christian FaithYeezy Comes to Jesus: Considering Kayne West’s Profession and Promotion of the Christian FaithDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker writes that “the idea of death, the fear of it haunts the human animal like nothing else; it is the mainspring of human activity — activity designed largely to avoid the fatality of death, to overcome it by denying in some way that it is the final destiny for man” Becker also says, “All culture, all man’s creative life-ways are in some basic part of them a fabricated protest against natural reality, a denial of the truth of the human condition, and an attempt to forget the pathetic creature that man is”. Today many philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists and sociologists agree that humans are desperately afraid of dying. Having children, writing a book, creating a work of art, building a skyscraper, or inventing a cure for cancer or COVID-19 can all serve as symbolic immortality projects. Will these efforts leave humans a legacy for generations?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author about his article, “Symbolic Immortality Projects Can’t Save You” which is in the new issue of the Christian Research Journal (September 2020) https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/ and is based on the book Immortal which is our equipping resource this month. https://www.equip.org/product/cri-resource-cri2009wa/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and podcasts featuring this authorHank Unplugged: Why God Permits Evil with Clay JonesEpisode 176 Our Fallen WorldPostmodern Realities: Episode 114 Why Did God Let that Child Die?Why Did God Let That Child Die?Postmodern Realities: Episode 068: Something Made: The Role of Form in ApologeticsSomething Made : The Role of Form in Apologetics Postmodern Realities: Episode 030: Evangelizing the Cultural Christian Evangelizing the Cultural ChristianKilling the Canaanites: A Response to the New Atheism’s “Divine Genocide” Claims Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
“Why,” Camus asks, “should a human go on living if life has no meaning?” He concludes that life can be lived—even loved—despite the emptiness from which it arises and to which it returns. Such meaninglessness as Camus describes arises from his lack of religious faith. What he does accept are those things of which he feels sure: “This heart within me I can feel, and I judge that it exists. This world I can touch, and I likewise judge that it exists. There ends all my knowledge, and the rest is construction.”Unable to penetrate beyond these two certainties, he asks what a human being should make of this existence. The answer makes Albert Camus compelling for everyone, Christians included: “I know that in order to keep alive, the absurd cannot be settled. It escapes suicide to the extent that it is simultaneously awareness and rejection of death.” By acknowledging that death destroys meaning while resisting its power to make him despair, Camus takes up the fight for life.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Stephen Mitchell about 37:6 (2014) article, “The Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for Life”. https://www.equip.org/article/sting-death-albert-camus-fight-life/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 189 Second-Rate Musician: Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot’s The Confidential Clerk Second-Rate Musician:Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot’s The Confidential ClerkEpisode 135-Questing for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadQuesting for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadEpisode 111 Humanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionHumanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionEpisode 092 Literary Apologetics: Flannery O’ConnorEpisode 045: Alexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand InquisitorAlexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand Inquisitor Rejoicing over Owls: Thoreau and the Gift of Being The Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for Life Reading My Favorite Atheists: Ivan, Raskolnikov, and Kirilov Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Maturity in human beings is a kind of flourishing, becoming what you were made to be: socially, spiritually, and intellectually. The late theologian J. I. Packer wrote in his book A Quest for Godliness: The Puritan Vision of the Christian Life, “Maturity is a compound of wisdom, goodwill, resilience, and creativity.” What does that mean for Christian college students in 2020 as they face online studies and other challenges during the COVID-19 global pandemic? This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Philip Tallon on his online-exclusive article, “Wisdom for College Zoomers”. Coming Soon! Please check back here and our article archives page. We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 173 Jesus Wake Up!A Hidden LifeEpisode 155 The Marathon of Martyrdom: A Review of A Hidden LifeThe Marathon of Martyrdom: A Review of A Hidden LifeStar Wars: Rise of Skywalker Episode 154: The Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerThe Dead Won’t Stop Talking: A Review of The Rise of SkywalkerFred Rogers and Mr. Rogers Neighborhood: Episode 150: The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”The Eternal Importance of Being Awkwardly Earnest: A Review of “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”Steven Spielberg Movies: Episode 139 Clear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanClear Skies, Hurt Hearts, Can’t Lose: Why Spielberg’s Aliens Help Make us More HumanTolkien Review:Episode 123 Tolkien’s First FellowshipTolkien’s First Fellowship A film review of TolkienAlfred Hitchcock films:Episode 100: A. Hitchcock FilmsThe Coen Brother’s Films:Episode 050: O Father, Where Art Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of Existence“O Father, Where Are Thou? The Coen Brothers and the Riddle of ExistenceThe Films of Quentin Tarantino:Episode 001: The Films of Quentin Tarantino“Reservoir Gods: Quentin Tarantino’s Premodern Theology Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
What is the meaning of the term pro-life? How should Christians define this term? This is a point/counterpoint discussion. Michael W. Austin defends his viewpoint from his article “The Meaning of the Term Pro-Life. A Point/Counterpoint Conversation: Pro-Life for All Human Life” (available by clicking here https://www.equip.org/article/the-meaning-of-the-term-pro-life-a-point-counterpoint-conversation-pro-life-for-all-human-life/) and Seth Gruber defends his viewpoint from his article “The Meaning of the Term Pro-Life. A Point/Counterpoint Conversation: You’re Not Really Pro-Life Unless…You Oppose Abortion. That’s It!” (available by clicking here.https://www.equip.org/article/the-meaning-of-the-term-pro-life-a-point-counterpoint-conversation-youre-not-really-pro-life-unlessyou-oppose-abortion-thats-it/)We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles related to this topic:The 2012 Elections: Five Questions for Pro-Life AdvocatesThe Politics of Abortion: Should Christians Vote Straight Ticket? Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
It is almost impossible to spend any time on social media, to read any legacy media source, or opinion piece, or have a conversation with someone in real life and not come around to the question of cancelling. To be successfully cancelled, then, is to lose not only the right to participate in public discourse using social media, but to lose income, reputation, and in some cases real life friendships and community. Cancelling is an ancient and very human activity—the act of publicly shaming and then shunning someone so that others will be warned and adjust their own behavior accordingly. Cancel Culture is a mightier force, however, in that it marries the tried and true practice of shunning to the unprecedented power of Social Media. This is a conversation about cancel culture and if Christians should participate in it.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her online-exclusive “Cancel Culture and the Gospel: Where Can You Go When The Whole World Is Against You?”. https://www.equip.org/article/cancel-culture-and-the-gospel-where-can-you-go-when-the-whole-world-is-against-you/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 193 Catching UP with Rachel Hollis, Glennon Doyle & Jen HatmakerEpisode 191 Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedGods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis
To give a Christian apologetic response to school shootings, it is important to address the problem of evil. How is it possible that a perfectly good God who is in control over all things would allow such heinous acts of violence carried out against innocent children? Of first importance is the philosophical answer to this question. However, ministering to those affected by gun violence, we are also called to a ministry of patient listening and faithful presence. We simply should not try to present fully formed analytical answers to those who are lamenting the loss of a child. What we can do is be present in the day-to-day wrestling, listening to them in their distress, and pointing them to how Jesus has already-but-not-yet accomplished the end of suffering.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Lisa Cooper about her article in the 42:2 issue, “Was God at Sandy Hook Elementary that Day?” https://www.equip.org/article/was-god-at-sandy-hook-elementary-that-day/ We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and podcasts featuring this topic:Postmodern Realities Episode 127 Addressing the Emotional Problem of EvilAddressing the Emotional Problem of Evil: Why Christians HopePostmodern Realities Episode 114 Why Did God Let that Child Die? Why Did God Let That Child Die?Hank Unplugged: Why God Permits Evil with Clay JonesDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In the thirteenth century, Thomas Aquinas revitalized Christian theology by applying principles of Greek philosophy to the explanation and defense of the Christian faith. Thomism, or the philosophical application of Aquinas’s thought, has a privileged place in the Roman Catholic Church and has been embraced by a growing number of Evangelical and Protestant Thomists. Among non-Christians, Aquinas is usually encountered in first-year philosophy textbooks via excerpts of his five ways of proving the existence of God from his Summa Theologica. In addition, many atheists seeking to refute these proofs, often get wrong what Aquinas was teaching. This conversation is a discussion of each of Aquinas’s five proofs and how to answer the atheist interpretation of them.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Trent Horn about his article from the 41:2 “Thomas Aquinas’s Five Proofs for God Revisited”. https://www.equip.org/article/thomas-aquinass-five-proofs-for-god-revisited/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Words have meaning, but culture can impact word meaning and connotation. In an increasingly post-truth and relativistic society, words can mean anything we feel like they should mean, with seemingly no consequence and virtual acceptance of whatever meaning we choose.Today, caution is needed concerning how hijacking a word’s definition can marginalize others, especially faith communities, recognizing that we, as Christians, play a significant role in how words are used and perceived. Christians should evaluate post-truth terms and compare them with what those words meant in a Judeo-Christian-influenced semantic universe; use discernment; accurately discuss distortions, faithfully working toward an authentic biblical mission; use opportunities to advance biblical influence; and pray that God gives us wisdom about the true meaning and value of the Logos.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with D.K. Matthews, author of the cover article of the Volume 43, No. 1 issue of the Christian Research Journal, “Seduced? The Crisis of Word and the Fragmentation of Civilization.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/Subscribe to the Journal here.Buy this single issue here.When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Hank Unplugged podcast featuring this author:Hank Unplugged: The Word Crisis that Threatens to Undo Western Civilization with D.K. Matthews Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Long-time Christian Research Journal author Dr. Douglas Groothuis writes, “I am getting older, and I lament the recent loss of so many Christian leaders who have shaped my thinking. I also am disturbed by so many recent deconversions of well-known Christians. So, I need to write about what I have not written much. Autobiography can be an apologetic for what matters most—the Christian message and way of being. My narrative relates my conversion and intellectual development.” Join us for this conversation about Doug’s spiritual journey and accompanying article.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Doug Groothuis about his online-exclusive article, “Autobiography as Apologetic”. https://www.equip.org/article/autobiography-as-apologetic/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 157: The Reincarnation of ReincarnationThe Reincarnation of ReincarnationEpisode 122 Shamelessly Wrong Shamelessly Wrong: Book Review of Shameless: A Sexual Reformation Nadia Bolz-WeberEpisode 004: Agile Apologetics Developing an Agile Apologetic Channeling: Revelations Of DeceptionLearning From an Apostle: Christianity in the Marketplace of Ideas (Acts 17:16-34) Why Buddhism is Not True: Review of Why Buddhism Is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and EnlightenmentJean-Paul Satre And The Resurgence Of ExistentialismFrancis Schaeffer: Pastor, Evangelist, Apologist, Prophet The Christian Apologist’s Moral Compass Steve Jobs, Jesus, and the Problem of EvilAnd many more, Dr. Groothuis has written articles for us for over 30 years.Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this episode, guest Anne Kennedy author of articles for the Christian Research Journal on Rachel Hollis, Glennon Doyle and Jen Hatmaker tells listeners why they are in the news again.Please see the following articles Anne has written, Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis, Gods, https://www.equip.org/article/have-you-considered-trying-harder-the-theology-of-rachel-hollis/Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of Untamed by Glennon Doyle ,https://www.equip.org/article/gods-gold-and-cheetahs-the-theological-vision-of-untamed/ and “The Theological Mess in the Moxie of Jen Hatmaker”, https://www.equip.org/article/the-theological-mess-in-the-moxie-of-jen-hatmaker/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/To partner with us and help us to continue to create free online exclusive content, we are offering a special promotion Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 191 Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedGods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of UntamedEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis
What is Christian worship? Does the substance, sufficiency, and effect of worship hinge upon the emotions of the participants? God’s presence in Christian worship does not hinge on subjective experience. God is the author of beauty and yet earthly beauty fades. The human soul yearns for eternal beauty. Ancient forms of worship, often eschewed as dead ceremonies by moderns, employ the beauty of earthly things to draw the soul to contemplate eternal verities. Scripture provides the model. The earthly temple was beautiful, and His heavenly temple is unspeakably and unfathomably so. In both instances, visible beauty bespeaks the majesty of the invisible God who gave His creatures physical senses. Hymns, written prayers, vestments, candles, incense, stained-glass windows, architecture, pulpit, and table — these visibly display the invisible truth that when the church gathers, heaven and earth meet. The senses — smell, taste, touch, sight, hearing — are all drawn heavenward and become instruments by which the worshiper gives glory to God. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Matt Kennedy about his article in the 43:1 issue, “The Beauty of Worship: Aesthetics and Truth.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 184 Unity in the Body of ChristEpisode 156 The Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleThe Prayers Rose Like Incense: Anglican Worship and the Normative PrincipleDon’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Glennon Doyle stepped into the spotlight in 2012, like so many, with a single post on her blog, Momastery, entitled “Don’t Carpe Diem.” In a single witty, incisive missive she wrote what every mother thinks silently to herself as she muscles a full cart of children through Target only to be interrupted by well-meaning grandmotherly types who declare, among other things, “I hope you’re enjoying every moment.” You can’t seize the day, she says, that way lies madness. Therein arises Doyle’s undeniable appeal. Tragically, as her first book Carry On, Warrior hit the market Doyle’s husband confessed to serial adultery over the whole course of their marriage. Desperate to rescue her own life, and, she admits in Untamed, her own plot line, she winched her disintegrating marriage back together, leading to her second bestseller, Love Warrior, the story of marital reconciliation no matter the cost, of dealing head on with the heartbreak of betrayal. But in the very first week of the launch of Love Warrior, Doyle saw Abby Wambach across a crowded room and fell in love. Doyle went home, broke up with her husband, and a year later she and Wambach were married. Untamed is that story—how she finally let go of all that “society” taught her to value, how she “burnt it all down” and found her true self. Many Christians have never heard of Doyle, preferring to focus their Christian discipleship within the spiritual confines of the church community rather than the internet. But in a time when Christian identity, like all identity, is up to the individual to craft and shape according to preference and desire, Doyle’s writing is ringing true for those even inside the church.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Anne Kennedy about her online-exclusive article, “Gods, Gold, and Cheetahs: The Theological Vision of Untamed.” https://www.equip.org/article/gods-gold-and-cheetahs-the-theological-vision-of-untamed/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 181 But What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownBut What If It Is Me? The Work and Worldview of Brené BrownEpisode 178 Worshipping TogetherEpisode 160-Naming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameNaming Names: Why It’s OK (and Necessary) to Call Out False Teachers and Fugitives from Church Justice by NameEpisode 151 Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Am I a Bad Christian for Watching Hallmark Christmas Movies?Episode 147 Book Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage and An Evaluation of 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceA Helper Like Me: A Review of Modern Kinship: A Queer Guide to Christian Marriage by David and Constantino KhalafLosing Faith: A Look at the 2019 Evolving Faith ConferenceEpisode 140 The Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerThe Unhindered Leadership of Jen HatmakerThe Theological “Mess” in the “Moxie” of Jen HatmakerEpisode 136 Have You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel HollisHave You Considered Trying Harder: The Theology of Rachel Hollis Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In May 2020 FX and Hulu released the documentary AKA Jane Roe promoting the deathbed confession of Norma McCorvey, the woman publicly known as the Jane Roe of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 legal decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States allows abortion to be legal. McCorvey allegedly confided to documentarian Nick Sweeney that her pro-life work, spanning more than two decades, was a lie. In her own words, “I took their money, and they put me out in front of the cameras and told me what to say, and that’s what I’d say.” The story as reported casts a pall over her much-celebrated conversion to the pro-life community while affirming cynical views held by abortion supporters concerning the character of those who fight legal abortion. As far as the ethics of abortion, does McCorvey’s judgment on abortion really matter?This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Jay Watts about his online-exclusive article, “Assessing the Confession of Norma McCorvey in AKA Jane Roe”. https://www.equip.org/article/assessing-the-confession-of-norma-mccorvey-in-aka-jane-roe/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 163 Merely Human: The Problem of Recognizing Chimpanzees as PersonsMerely Human: The Problem of Recognizing Chimpanzees as PersonsEpisode 134 Are Laws Restricting Abortion Forced Organ Donation? A Review of Beyond RoeAre Laws Restricting Abortion Forced Organ Donation? A Review of Beyond RoeEpisode 117-Unplanned: An Imperfect but Brave Film Unplanned: An Imperfect but Brave FilmEpisode 042: When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on Campus When Freedom of Expression and Emotions Collide on CampusEpisode 032: On Chimeras and What It Means to Be Human On Chimeras and What It Means to Be Human Episode 013: Death with Dignity and the Imago DeiDeath with Dignity and the Imago Dei Episode 007: Rape and Sexual Violence on the College CampusRape and Sexual Violence on Campus
A meritocracy insists that a person’s sense of identity and value is grounded in his or her own performance or action. For Christians, however, being is a divine gift. Thus, identity and value are determined by divine action, not by personal effort. If we rest in this divine action, we can withdraw from competing identities and from the perpetual and exhausting demands of ambition. But meritocratic values And their attendant anxiety have spread, in part, because the notion of vocation has all but disappeared from public consciousness. How might we recapture a sense of vocation? T. S. Eliot offers a case in point. His play, The Confidential Clerk, depicts a young man who must choose one of two paths: meritocratic success or vocation. God’s calling on our lives may not align with what society tells us is successful. However, we are responsible to be only what God has called us to be, whether that is a person leading a large business or a musician playing at a local nursing home. Our vocation should lead us to a deeper relationship with our Creator. If we are in Him, we will never be second-rate.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Stephen Mitchell about his article in the 43:1 Journal “Second-Rate Musician:Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot’s The Confidential Clerk “. https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this authorEpisode 135-Questing for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadQuesting for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy’s The RoadEpisode 111 Humanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionHumanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionEpisode 092 Literary Apologetics: Flannery O’ConnorEpisode 045: Alexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand InquisitorAlexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand Inquisitor Rejoicing over Owls: Thoreau and the Gift of Being The Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for Life Reading My Favorite Atheists: Ivan, Raskolnikov, and Kirilov Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
Having burst into popularity on the millennial and younger social media platform TikTok, the phrase “OK Boomer,” whose true origins are lost in the murk of the back pages of the internet, is used by many millennials (those born between about 1981 and 1996) to dismiss their parents’ generation of baby boomers (those born between about 1946 and 1964) as out of touch and self-centered. And, in a sign that its use has expanded beyond mere internet meme-dom and into the public sphere, one New Zealand member of Parliament responded to another member’s heckling with a dismissive “OK, Boomer.” In 2020 in our particular historical moment, when we find ourselves confronted by a global pandemic from a virus that has proven especially dangerous for the sick and elderly, questions about intergenerational conflict have special weight. Discussion about what sort of containment measures are sufficient and whether it is ethical to risk the lives of the elderly for the sake of the economy have become issues of public debate. However, the Bible calls us to reject this conflict and calls Christians to a beautiful vision of an intergenerational, interdependent, remembering community. This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Kyle Keating about his article in the 43:1 Journal, entitled, “OK, Boomer: Time to Declare a Truce in the Generational Wars.” https://www.equip.org/christian-research-journal/the-word-crisis-that-threatens-to-undo-western-civilization/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here. https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author: Episode 133 The Disorientation of DeconversionAm I Just Not Chosen? The Disorientation of DeconversionEpisode 074: Authentic Community in the Age of Social MediaCream or Sugar? Fostering Authentic Community in the Expanding Age of Social Media
COVID-19 has been incredibly costly — it has cost millions of people their jobs, thousands of people their lives, and has changed the shape of our lives in countless ways. In the midst of all the anxiety and uncertainty, it can be difficult to stay hopeful. However, if Christians really believe that God works all things together for good for those who love Him (Rom. 8:28), we should expect God to provide us opportunities to grow in our relationship to Him. One of the clearest good things that has arisen out of COVID-19 is the amount of time families spend together. Time, however, is beneficial only when put to good use. This episode is a conversation with JOURNAL author Drew Dixon about five ways Christians can promote spiritual health and disciple in their family during this pandemic.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Drew Dixon about his online-exclusive article, “Five Ways to Disciple Your Family During the Pandemic.”https://www.equip.org/article/five-ways-to-disciple-your-family-during-the-quarantine/We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles and Postmodern Realities podcasts featuring this author:Episode 128 Summer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to FortniteSummer Vacation, Kids, and Video Games: Better Alternatives to FortniteEpisode 098 Virtual Violence, Video Game Addiction, and the Kingdom of GodVirtual Violence, Video Game Addiction, and the Kingdom of GodEpisode 066: Comic Cons, Geek Culture, and the Mission of ChristComic Cons, Geek Culture and the Mission of Christ Don’t miss an episode; please subscribe to the Postmodern Realities podcast wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Please help spread the word about Postmodern Realities by giving us a rating and review when you subscribe to the podcast. The more ratings and reviews we have, the more new listeners can discover our content.
In this short podblast episode of the Postmodern Realities Podcast 2020 COVID-19 shelter-in-place series, JOURNAL Author J. Warner Wallace gives a word of encouragement to Christian students in Gen Z and their parents about how to think biblically about their new normal as students and their grief and lament over missed milestones in their academic and social lives. We’d also like to invite you to subscribe to the Journal. To subscribe to the Journal, please click here. When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our free online-exclusive articles, such as this review, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support keeping our resources free is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3 or $5, which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here.Other articles and podcasts featuring this authorHank Unplugged: Cold-Case Christianity with J. Warner WallacePostmodern Realities: Episode 102 What Cops Can Teach Christians about the Critical Use of LanguageWhat Cops Can Teach Christians about the Critical Use of Language
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