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Patrick and I are always stressing the importance of code reviews and collaboration when developing.  On Freund, co-founder & CEO at Wilco, is super familiar with how code review processes can go well, or become a hinderance. In today’s episode with us, he shares his unique perspective on code reviews and maintaining high code quality!00:00:56 Introductions00:01:38 On’s first exposure to tech00:06:04 Game development adventures00:11:12 The difference between university and real-world experiences00:17:43 A context switch question00:24:41 Points of frustration00:30:53 Build versus Buy complications00:32:06 Code reviews00:39:58 Quality of code00:45:12 Using callouts for the right reasons00:49:57 Code reviews can be too late sometimes00:52:11 Using social interaction as pre-review orientation00:57:03 How not to use code reviews01:01:35 Where Wilco helps programmers learn01:09:11 Working in Wilco01:11:49 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Links: On Freund:Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/onfreund Wilco: Website: https://www.trywilco.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/trywilco Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/trywilco  References:Micro-Adventure:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_Adventure  If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
At scale, anything we build is going to involve people.  Many of us have personal schedules and to-do lists, but how can we scale that to hundreds or even thousands of people?  When you file a help ticket at a massive company like Google or Facebook, ever wonder how that ticket is processed? Sanjay Siddhanti, Akasa’s Director of Engineering, is no slouch when it comes to navigating massive workflow engines – and in today’s episode, he shares his experiences in bioinformatics, workflows, and more with us.00:00:39 Workflow engine definitions00:01:40 Introductions00:02:24 Sanjay’s 8th grade programming experience00:05:28 Bioinformatics00:10:29 The academics-vs-industry dilemma00:16:52 Small company challenges00:18:18 Correctly identifying when to scale00:24:04 The solution Akasa provides00:31:38 Workflow engines in detail00:36:02 ETL frameworks00:45:06 The intent of integration construction00:47:13 Delivering a platform vs delivering a solution00:50:04 Working within US medico-legal frameworks00:53:28 Inadvertent uses of API calls00:55:47 Working in Akasa00:57:09 Interning in Akasa00:58:35 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Sanjay: Twitter: https://twitter.com/siddhantis Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sanjaysiddhanti/ Akasa: Website: https://www.akasa.com Sanjay’s Q&A https://akasa.com/blog/10-questions-for-sanjay-siddhanti-director-of-engineering-at-akasa/ Careers: https://akasa.com/careers/ Interning: https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/research-intern-ai-spring-summer-2023-at-akasa-3206403183/ References: Episode 33: Design Patterns:https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/2014/05/episode-33-design-patterns.html The Mythical Man-Month:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
S1: Holiday 2022 Special

S1: Holiday 2022 Special

2022-12-2601:12:39

S1: Holiday 2022 SpecialToday we field questions from Programming Throwdown’s listeners about AI, machine learning, and more practical matters as developers in our annual holiday special!00:00:24 Introductions00:00:43 Programming Showdown merch00:02:13 Paul S00:03:28 Dealing with ergonomics00:10:39 On AI coding assistant tools00:16:43 Warren Y00:20:24 Ben inquires about performance testing00:27:39 Wild coding story00:29:37 AI coding’s disruption potential00:34:20 Jason’s Turing riddle00:35:50 ChatGPT00:43:59 Christian B00:45:13 Collection-of-Letters asks on documentation00:49:07 Zeh F00:50:51 Coding books that weren’t that great00:54:40 James K00:57:32 Jeremy S wonders about ML01:00:45 Virtual and live hangouts01:02:09 A retrospective01:07:49 Xu L01:09:22 Showing off the shirts01:11:31 FarewellsIf you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon. Happy holidays from Programming Throwdown to everyone! ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Package managers are an often-overlooked aspect of any operating system, but their importance is not to be underestimated – especially in today’s development environment. As both creator of Homebrew and CEO of tea.xyz, Max Howell is intimately familiar with the ins and outs of open-source development, software engineering, and balancing passion with practicality. He shares these experiences and more with us in today’s deep dive into the subject!00:01:00 Introductions00:01:29 When Max started Tea.XYZ00:03:51 British plugs00:08:10 Literally rolling out of bed to work00:11:49 The value of meetups00:13:14 Getting into open-source00:23:00 Mandrake00:25:02 Turning frustration into action00:30:47 Deno00:40:28 OSX’s relationship with Unix00:55:33 Trying out Ruby01:01:13 April Fools prank ideas01:04:13 The cause of sleepless nights with Homebrew01:14:41 What got Max inspired to do Tea01:19:53 From startup to company01:41:55 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Links:Tea.XYZ: Website: https://tea.xyz/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/teaxyz_ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tea.xyz/ Github: https://github.com/teaxyz Reddit: https://reddit.com/r/teaxyz Discord: https://discord.com/invite/KCZsXfJphn References: 101 on Package Management:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Package_manager Deno:https://deno.land/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Yonatan Cohen – Co-Founder & CTO of Quantum Machines – joins us in this episode to tackle quantum computing!  Did you know anyone can run quantum programs on Amazon Web Services for mere dollars? Learn about this field early to take pole superposition in the race to understand and use quantum computers!00:00:45 Introductions00:01:20 Yonatan’s beginnings00:03:49 The simulation question00:05:51 How physics led to quantum computing00:14:56 Richard Feynman00:16:44 On the irreversibility of normal computers00:21:25 Logic gates00:25:04 Qubits00:30:11 An example of qubits00:38:19 Why simulating a quantum computer matters00:42:23 NP-complete problems00:48:57 More people at a higher development level are needed00:54:16 Quantum machines in the middle layer01:02:56 Working at Quantum Machines01:05:05 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Links: Quantum Machines: Website: https://www.quantum-machines.co/ Careers: https://www.quantum-machines.co/careers/ Yonatan Cohen:Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yonatan-cohen-10076b113/ References:Getting Started with Quantum Computinghttps://builtin.com/software-engineering-perspectives/how-to-learn-quantum-computing If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
In this tour-de-force, Mike Dalessio – Engineering Director at Shopify – and Evan Phoenix – self-described “long-time Rubyist” – join us for a practical discussion of all things Ruby! Ruby is a beautiful language, and we're really excited to cover the history and present of this language with two experts. 00:01:03 Introductions00:01:49 Mike’s Ruby journey00:12:28 Evan’s own Ruby experience00:18:20 The pickaxe book00:20:34 Weird programming interests00:25:11 MINASWAN00:30:33 Language conferences00:36:38 Wrong answers on StackOverflow00:41:53 RubyCentral00:44:50 In-depth examination of Ruby00:47:57 How Shopify sticks to vanilla Rails00:50:28 A tale of two developers00:59:59 Bringing Ruby up to Python’s level01:04:48 Shopify’s largest app monolith01:11:12 Tuning the knobs01:18:01 How not to learn the hard way01:18:57 Opportunities at Shopify01:29:14 Working with the RubyShield program01:32:07 Rails for API servers01:33:21 Mike and Evan’s advice for listeners01:36:00 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Links: RubyCentral: Website: https://rubycentral.org/ RubyShield: https://rubycentral.org/ruby-shield Twitter: https://twitter.com/rubycentralorg Shopify: Website: https://www.shopify.com/ Careers: https://www.shopify.com/careers Dev Degree Program: https://devdegree.ca/pages/program HashiCorp Website: https://www.hashicorp.com/ Careers: https://www.hashicorp.com/jobs Mike Dalessio: Website: http://mike.daless.io/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/flavorjones Evan Phoenix: Website: https://github.com/evanphx Twitter: https://twitter.com/evanphx RubyConf 2022 (Nov. 29 – Dec. 1, 2022):Website: https://rubyconf.org/ Other Episodes:Episode 47: RubyShow Link: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/2015/10/episode-47-ruby.html  References:“The Pickaxe Book” aka Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide 2nd Edition:Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Ruby-Pragmatic-Programmers-Second/dp/0974514055  If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Today we discuss adventures, books, tools, and art discoveries before diving into unsupervised machine learning in this duo episode!00:00:22 Introductions00:01:28 Email & inbox organization is very important00:07:28 The Douglas-Peucker algorithm00:11:48 Starter project selection00:17:01 Tic-Tac-Toe 00:21:41 Artemis 100:26:25 Space slingshots00:29:47 Flex Seal tape00:32:38 The Meditations00:37:58 Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast00:40:55 Pythagorea00:46:13 Google Keep00:48:05 Visual-IF00:50:49 Data insights01:03:07 Self-supervised learning01:10:26 A practical example of clustering01:15:10 Word embedding01:24:02 FarewellsWant to learn more? Check out these previous episodes: Episode 27: Artificial Intelligence Theoryhttps://www.programmingthrowdown.com/2013/05/episode-27-artificial-intelligence.html Episode 28: Applied Artificial Intelligencehttps://www.programmingthrowdown.com/2013/06/episode-28-applied-artificial.html Episode 109: Digital Marketing with Kevin Urrutia https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/2021/03/episode-109-digital-marketing-with.html Resources mentioned in this episode:News/Links: Simplify lines with the Douglas-Peucker Algorithmhttps://ilya.puchka.me/douglas-peucker-algorithm/  How to pick a starter projecthttps://amir.rachum.com/blog/2022/08/07/starter-project/ Tic-Tac-Toe in a single call to printf()https://github.com/carlini/printf-tac-toe  Artemis 1https://www.nasa.gov/artemis-1/ Visual-IFhttps://www.visual-if.com/ Book of the Show: Jason’s Choice: “The Meditations” by Marcus Aureliushttps://amzn.to/3C3Kg7b Patrick’s Choice: “Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast” by Ken Forkishhttps://amzn.to/3CqFwKa Tool of the Show: Jason’s Choice: Pythagorea Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.hil_hk.pythagorea&hl=en&gl=US iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/pythagorea/id994864779 Patrick’s Choice: Google Keep https://keep.google.com/ References: Clustering: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cluster_analysis Autoencoding: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoencoder Contrastive Learning: https://towardsdatascience.com/understanding-contrastive-learning-d5b19fd96607 Matrix Factorization: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_factorization_(recommender_systems) Stochastic factorization: https://link.medium.com/ytuaUAYBjtb Deep Learning: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_learning If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Today we go back to our programming language roots with author, KT Academy founder, and Kotlin rockstar Marcin Moskala.  We talk about how Kotlin makes itself doubly useful for app and backend development. 00:00:55 Introductions00:01:38 Java frustrations 00:09:37 Why a well-organized typing system is important00:11:59 What Kotlin is00:14:58 Obsidian 00:20:13 Learning new things can be a prudent future investment00:23:46 A pleasant coding experience00:26:41 Co-routines in Kotlin00:34:37 Where co-routines are best in app development00:44:54 Thread balancing in practice00:57:39 Kotlin’s integrated cancellation mechanism01:05:10 Getting started with Kotlin01:18:16 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Marcin Moskala: Website: https://marcinmoskala.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marcinmoskala KT Academy: https://kt.academy/ Kotlin Learning Resources Marcin on KT: https://kt.academy/user/marcinmoskala Kotlin Coroutines: https://leanpub.com/coroutines Effective Kotlin: https://leanpub.com/effectivekotlin Functional Kotlin (Early Access): https://leanpub.com/kotlin_functional More Kotlin Publications on Leanpub Information Organization Tools WorkFlowy: https://workflowy.com/ Obsidian: https://obsidian.md/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Finding something online might seem easy - but as Marcus Eagan tells it, it’s not easy to get it right. In today’s episode, MongoDB’s Staff Product Manager on Atlas Search speaks with Jason and Patrick about his own journey in software development and how to best use search engines to capture user intent. 00:00:34 Introductions00:01:30 Marcus’s unusual origin story00:05:10 Unsecured IoT devices00:09:56 How security groupthink can compromise matters00:12:48 The Target HVAC incident00:17:32 Business challenges with home networks00:21:51 Damerau-Levenshtein edit distance factor ≤ 200:23:58 How do people who do search talk about search00:30:35 Inferring human intent before they intend it00:46:13 Ben Horowitz00:47:32 Seinfeld as an association exercise00:52:27 What Marcus is doing at MongoDB00:58:30 How MongoDB can help at any level01:01:00 Working at MongoDB01:08:14 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode: Marcus Eagan: Website: https://marcussorealheis.medium.com The Future of Search Is Semantic & Lexical: https://marcussorealheis.medium.com/the-future-of-search-is-semantic-and-lexical-e55cc9973b63 13 Hard Things I Do To Be A Dope Product Manager: https://marcussorealheis.medium.com/13-hard-things-i-do-to-be-a-dope-database-product-manager-7064768505f8 Github: https://github.com/MarcusSorealheis Twitter: https://twitter.com/marcusforpeace MongoDB: Website: https://www.mongodb.com/ Atlas: https://www.mongodb.com/cloud/atlas/register Careers: https://www.mongodb.com/careers Others: Damerau-Levenshtein distance: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damerau%E2%80%93Levenshtein_distance Lucene: https://lucene.apache.org/core/ Target HVAC Incident (2014, Archive Link): https://archive.is/Wnwob  Mergify:Website: https://mergify.com/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Douwe Maan’s journey sounds too fantastic to be true, yet the tale that Meltano’s founder shares with Jason and Patrick today is very, very real. Whether it’s about doing software development by 11, joining Gitlab while juggling college responsibilities, or building his own company during today’s challenging times, he has quite the story to tell. In today’s episode, he speaks on Twitter, his perspective on remote work, and why data operations are a critical part of developer stacks in today’s world.00:01:00 Introductions00:03:44 Hustling online at 1100:08:08 From iOS to web-based development00:10:20 How Douwe balanced school and work00:12:05 Sid Sijbrandij00:19:13 Why Twitter was integral in Douwe’s journey00:21:01 What Meltano offers for data teams00:22:01 Remote work00:30:59 Gitlab’s data team and what they do00:44:40 What tools do data engineers use00:47:40 Singer00:50:26 Game designer travails00:58:59 Where data operations come in01:05:12 Getting started with Meltano01:12:00 Meltano as a company01:22:09 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Douwe Maan: Website: https://douwe.me/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/douwem GitLab: https://github.com/DouweM Meltano: Website: https://meltano.com/ Careers: https://boards.greenhouse.io/meltano Singer:Website: https://www.singer.io/ Mergify:Website: https://mergify.com/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:01:03 Introductions00:04:47 Mojovision00:06:07 Chips’ storied journey00:11:06 Project Xanadu00:18:45 Getting into Lucasfilm00:31:31 Artificial Intelligence in games00:39:48 GTA MP01:00:10 How the game industry drives people01:08:29 Agoric and its niche in the blockchain01:20:12 Javascript’s securability01:22:46 Working with Agoric01:32:20 What skills Agoric’s team looks for01:35:31 Chip’s parting thoughts01:37:00 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Chip Morningstar:Twitter: https://twitter.com/epopt Agoric: Website: https://agoric.com/ Careers: https://agoric.com/careers/ Habitat Chronicles:Website: http://habitatchronicles.com/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:00:57 Introductions00:01:51 How Ronak got started in programming00:06:03 The first encounter with burnout00:11:49 Double-edged benefits00:17:23 Spoon theory00:19:07 Why relationship clarity matters00:25:11 A cold room story00:30:59 Context switching’s relevance00:35:45 QTorque’s solution to monitor cloud automation costs00:39:19 Setting up lifetimes00:42:17 Bom lists00:49:19 How Quali helps with the challenges00:54:40 What to do to actualize your true self00:58:00 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode: Ronak Rahman:    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ofronak Quali:          Website: https://www.quali.com/          Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/qualisystems/          QTorque Free Tier: https://www.qtorque.io/pricing/          Join QTorque: https://portal.qtorque.io/joinIf you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:00:45 Introductions00:02:22 The sluggish Python-based system that Guido revitalized00:06:03 Meeting the challenge of adding necessary complexity to a project00:11:59 Excel in banking00:18:15 Guido’s shift into Coil00:19:29 Scooby-Doo pajamas00:20:21 What motivates people to come in to the office today00:24:09 Pandas00:35:35 Why human error can doom an Excel setup00:39:29 BLAS00:46:20 A million lines of data00:51:43 How does Dask interact with Gambit00:54:40 Where does Coil come in00:59:34 The six-o-clock question01:03:53 Dealing with matters of difficult decomposition01:12:07 The Coil work experience01:15:37 Why contributing is impressive01:20:20 Coil’s product offering01:21:19 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Guido Imperiale:Github: https://github.com/crusaderky Coiled: Website: https://coiled.io Careers: https://coiled.io/careers/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:00:24 Introductions00:00:49 IP v600:04:50 OSI00:12:53 The IP v7 debate00:20:18 The definition of an address’s scope00:21:38 Why John feels DNS was a mistake00:26:40 How IP mobility works00:32:13 Bluetooth 00:41:41 Where will Internet architecture go from here00:49:49 Understanding the problem space00:59:04 The angels in the details01:00:53 Scientific thinking vs engineering thinking01:04:01 Victorian architecture01:06:11 John’s career advice01:11:18 Garbage Can Model01:14:38 How to make the most out of college today01:27:05 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode: Professor John D. Day: Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Day_(computer_scientist) Website: https://www.bu.edu/met/profile/john-day/ Book: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/patterns-in-network/9780132252423/ Terminologies: CIDR: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classless_Inter-Domain_Routing OSI: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model Connectionless Network Protocol: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connectionless-mode_Network_Service SIP (Session Initiation Protocol): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Session_Initiation_Protocol Garbage can model: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage_can_model If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:01:01 Introduction00:01:28 COVID and the challenge of teaching00:04:11 John’s academic and career path00:08:14 LSI technology00:12:13 Collaborative software development in the day00:15:24 ARPANET’s early use00:20:08 Atom bomb and weather simulations00:26:55 The message-switching network 00:34:57 Pouzin00:38:00 Every register had a purpose00:45:15 The Air Force in 197200:52:10 Low memory00:59:14 Early problems with TCP01:11:51 The separation of mechanism and policy01:23:25 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Professor John D. Day: Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Day_(computer_scientist) Website: https://www.bu.edu/met/profile/john-day/ Book: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/patterns-in-network/9780132252423/  Pouzin Society:  Website: https://pouzinsociety.org/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/pouzinsociety If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
136: Metaverse with Daniel LiebeskindDecentralizing the future can often lead to missing out on genuine human communication. Daniel Liebeskind, Cofounder and CEO of Topia, talks about how they’re working to avoid that pitfall while building the foundation of a better online experience. Whether its his lessons from Burning Man, keeping the human spirit alive in today’s technological frontier, or how Topia fits in the future, Daniel has something for listeners.00:01:34 Introduction00:02:15 Daniel and early programming experience00:07:51 How coding felt like sorcery00:09:35 Skill trees00:16:10 Second Life00:19:56 Enhancing versus replacing real life experiences00:26:28 A decentralized Metaverse00:29:54 Web 2 versus Web 3 00:34:15 /r/place00:44:16 Why boom cycles are important for tech00:46:03 Topia for consumers00:52:47 Topia as a company00:55:50 Opportunities at Topia00:58:00 Topia.io01:03:50 FarewellsResources mentioned in this episode:Daniel Liebeskind, Cofounder and CEO of Topia: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dliebeskind/ Website: https://medium.com/@dliebeskind Twitter: https://twitter.com/dliebeskind Topia: Website: https://topia.io/topia/careers LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/company/topia-io/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.comYou can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:00:15 Introduction00:01:03 Aran Khanna and his background00:05:12 The Marauder’s Map that Facebook hated(Chrome Extension)00:20:11 Why Google made Kubernetes00:31:14 Horizontal and Vertical Auto-Scaling00:35:54 Zencastr00:39:53 How machines talk to each other00:46:32 Sidecars00:48:25 Resources to learn Kubernetes00:52:59 Archera00:59:31 Opportunities at Archera01:01:08 Archera for End Users01:02:30 Archera as a Company01:05:46 Farewells   Resources mentioned in this episode:Aran Khanna, Cofounder of Archera: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aran-khanna/ Website: http://arankhanna.com/menu.html Twitter: https://twitter.com/arankhanna Archera: Website: https://archera.ai/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/archera-ai/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/archeraai Kubernetes: Website: https://kubernetes.io/ Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE77h7dmoQU If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon  ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
134: Ephemeral Environments with Benjie De GrootDownloadHow do you test changes to your web backend or database?  Many people have a "production" and one "development" database, but the development database can easily become broken by one engineer and thus unusable for the rest of the team.  Also, how would two engineers make changes in parallel to the development environment?  What if you could spin up hundreds or thousands of development databases as you need them? Today we have Benjie De Groot, Co-Founder and CEO of Shipyard to explain ephemeral environments and how virtual machines and containers have made massive improvements in devops! 00:00:15 Introduction00:00:24 Introducing Benjie De Groot00:01:26 Benjie’s Programming Background00:06:34 How Shipyard started00:09:17 Working in Startups vs. Tech Giants00:19:28 The difference between Virtual Machines and Containers00:26:17 Local Development Environment00:40:27 What is a DevOps engineer and what does it entail?00:45:42 Zencastr00:50:12 Shipyard as a company00:55:29 How Shipyard gets clients01:06:48 Farewells     Resources mentioned in this episode: Benjie De Groot, Co-Founder & CEO at Shipyard: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bueller/ Podcast: https://www.heavybit.com/library/podcasts/the-kubelist-podcast/ Shipyard: Website: https://shipyard.build/ Careers: https://shipyard.build/careers/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/shipyardbuild/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/shipyardbuild Community Website: https://ephemeralenvironments.io/ GitHub: https://github.com/shipyard Heavybit: Website: https://www.heavybit.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/heavybit/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/heavybit                  If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
As anyone who listens to the show regularly knows, I've always been fascinated by marketplaces.  How do we figure out what to charge for something, and how do we match buyers and sellers?  How does a company like Uber match drivers to riders so quickly?  Today we have Andrew Yates, Co-Founder & CEO at Promoted.ai, to talk about marketplaces and how to optimize for this two-sided problem. 00:00:15 Introduction00:00:27 Introducing Andrew Yates00:00:50 Andrew’s Programming Background00:04:19 Andrew at Promoted.AI00:08:17 What is a Marketplace?00:17:45 Marketplace Rankings00:22:50 Short-term vs Long-term Experience00:24:43 Machine Learning and the Marketplace00:34:57 Measurements00:37:09 Promoted.AI Integration00:38:31 How Promoted.AI Measures Success00:41:14 Auction Theory00:46:08 Experience with YCombinator00:50:34 Promoted.AI as a Company00:55:47 Farewells   Resources mentioned in this episode: Andrew Yates, Co-Founder & CEO at Promoted.ai: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrew-yates-0217a985/ Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/ayates_promoted  Promoted.ai: Website: https://www.promoted.ai/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/promoted-ai/ If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon  ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
00:00:15 Introduction00:01:24 Gaming setups00:12:25 News 00:12:27 I was wrong, CRDTs are the future 00:17:18 How we lost 54k Github stars 00:21:10 DALL-E  00:25:45 Inside the Longest Atlassian Outage of All Time 00:35:11: Sponsor00:36:22 Book of the Show 00:36:38 Indie Boardgame Designers Podcast 00:37:24 The Laundry Files 00:40:35 Tool of the Show 00:40:39 Zapier 00:42:21 Earthly 00:46:46 Funding open-source projects01:19:44 How to get funding for open-source projects01:22:47 Farewells  Resources mentioned in this episode:Media: The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters (2017) Class Action Park (2020) Indie Boardgame Designers Podcast: https://indieboardgamedesigners.com/ GitHub Stars Won’t Pay Your Rent: https://medium.com/@kitze/github-stars-wont-pay-your-rent-8b348e12baed News: I Was Wrong, CRDTs Are The Future: https://josephg.com/blog/crdts-are-the-future/ How We Lost 54k GitHub Stars: https://httpie.io/blog/stardust DALL-E: https://openai.com/blog/dall-e/ Inside the Longest Atlassian Outage of All Time: https://newsletter.pragmaticengineer.com/p/scoop-atlassian?s=r Books: Indie Board Game Designers Podcast The Laundry Files: https://amzn.to/3kdWWQg Tools: Zapier: https://zapier.com/ N8n: https://n8n.io/ Earthly: https://earthly.dev/ Adam Gordon Bell: Twitter: https://twitter.com/adamgordonbell Website: https://adamgordonbell.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamgordonbell/ CoRecursive: https://corecursive.com/   If you’ve enjoyed this episode, you can listen to more on Programming Throwdown’s website: https://www.programmingthrowdown.com/ Reach out to us via email: programmingthrowdown@gmail.com You can also follow Programming Throwdown on Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Player.FM  Join the discussion on our DiscordHelp support Programming Throwdown through our Patreon ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★
Comments (73)

Vlad Bezden

Very interesting and informative, especially part about co-routines in Kotlin

Nov 9th
Reply

Aurik Sarker

yee

Apr 20th
Reply

Augustus Christie-Paige

I've tried my best to get into this podcast but there's just far too much irrelevant chat... The first few episodes barely seem to contain 20-30% of content that relates to the topic. Plus the off-topic stuff really hasn't aged well, making it seem less credible as a whole. Maybe it gets better over time, but I'm not going to be a victim of the sunk cost fallacy on this occasion.

Jul 26th
Reply

Eduardo Sánchez

lol, why not only use Js instead of python ON TOP OF JS?

Jun 2nd
Reply

Diyar Faraj

47:19

Mar 8th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:50:18

Jul 23rd
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:47:23

Jul 22nd
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:51:21

Jul 22nd
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:46:56

Jul 21st
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:40:33

Jul 17th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:45:37

Jul 16th
Reply

AshenFox

going directly from client to database binds you to the structure of the database. A server allows you to move/modify the structure of the data without the client being affected. Long term this is a vital strategy as it constrains cascading changes.

Jul 15th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:45:14

Jul 12th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:38:11

Jul 10th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

01:00:10

Jul 9th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:40:21

Jul 8th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:29:45

Jul 7th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:47:06

Jul 7th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:51:05

Jul 7th
Reply

Diyar Faraj

00:50:33

Jul 6th
Reply
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