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Radio Health Journal

Radio Health Journal

Author: MediaTracks Communications

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Listen to Radio Health Journal to get the latest scoop on what’s trending in health, science and technology, and the intersection of medicine and public policy. Each week we speak with leading experts to break down the complex medical jargon and report on a timely topic. Did you know ecstasy could help to cure PTSD? What does “Medicare for All” really mean? These subjects and more with two stories weekly, plus Medical Notes – a short recap of the top medical headlines in the news. Hosted by Reed Pence, Nancy Benson and Shel Lustig. New shows posted each Sunday by 5 a.m. EST. Subscribe and listen, and find out more info at radiohealthjournal.net. Also, check out the latest on Instagram at radiohealthjournal and on Twitter at RadioHealthJrnl.
495 Episodes
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Smoldering Concussions

Smoldering Concussions

2020-01-1900:12:11

Doctors are realizing that concussions can smolder in the brain for years with symptoms that are missed, making diagnosis at the time of occurrence all the more important. Yet a new study shows that protocols affecting the most vulnerable—young athletes—often are not followed. Experts explain why, and what people should do when they receive any blow to the head.
Crushing Medical Debt

Crushing Medical Debt

2020-01-1900:18:57

Nearly a quarter of us owe past due medical debt, and hospitals are moving more aggressively to collect. The rise is the result of a tradeoff--Americans have avoided higher health insurance premiums only to be jeopardized by extremely high deductibles and out-of-network costs. Experts explain what unpaid medical debt can mean, how patients can escape its clutches, and how one charity works to buy and forgive debt.
A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 19, 2020, including: Late-stage age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss among older people. Then, long term effects of being born as a result of in vitro fertilization. And finally, people in Scandinavian countries say that taking a sauna has all kinds of benefits, and they’re apparently right.
A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 12, 2020, including: Teenagers are vaping marijuana at rapidly rising rates. Then, a report on concussions and why they can produce lifelong effects. Then, another study confirming the importance of sleep, and finally, a new survey of emergency rooms proves that smartphones make people run into things.
Some hospital units have set up handshake bans because too few healthcare workers wash hands well enough to keep from spreading germs. The general public is even worse at washing hands, which has caused spread of serious disease. Some experts say handshakes foster important human connections and oppose bans. Experts discuss and describe what it takes to wash hands well enough to be “clean.”
Broken Heart Syndrome

Broken Heart Syndrome

2020-01-1200:13:41

When a person suffers a severe emotional shock, they may suffer what looks like a heart attack but is actually what doctors call “stress cardiomyopathy.” Most patients recover but the condition can be fatal, confirming that it is possible to die of a broken heart. An expert explains.
Lies aren’t always bad. Often, they’re told to be polite, and compassionate people are most likely to tell whoppers. But as the stakes of lies rise, honesty trumps kindness. Yet few people are ever able to distinguish when they’re being told lies. Experts explain.
As loved ones age, tough decisions need to be made on finances, housing, and other concerns, and these decisions need to be made far earlier than they typically are. This is especially true if a person does not have family to act as support and caregiver.
A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 5, 2020, including two experimental drugs that show promise in women with certain types of breast cancer. Then, the Federal Communications Commission has started the process to create a three-digit number similar to 9-1-1 that connects to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Then, it appears that teenagers aren’t very good at telling the difference between real and fake news, and finally, can magic mushrooms be used to treat depression?
Hoarding disorder affects at least five percent of Americans, and despite TV programs showing its effects, it is still widely misunderstood. Experts discuss the danger hoarding poses to others, including neighbors, children, and first responders; why those with the disorder are so attached to things; and the right and wrong ways to address the problem.
Melanoma Advances

Melanoma Advances

2019-12-2900:12:59

Fifteen years ago, advanced melanoma was usually lethal. But new treatments harnessing the immune system have increased survival so much that researchers haven’t completely been able to quantify it. An expert physician discusses the advances.
A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 29, 2019, including: The last three flu seasons have been bad, but there’s a chance this year could be even worse. Then, sleeping too much can be a risk factor for stroke. Plus, more than 30 million people in the United States think they’re allergic to penicillin when they’re not. And finally, if you’re scheduled for surgery, ask your doctor what kind of music she listens to in the operating room.
Winter in general, and the holidays in particular, are the busiest time of year in hospital emergency departments, even in places where it doesn’t snow. Experts discuss the increase in deaths of all kinds, including the “Merry Christmas Coronary” and possible reasons those deaths bounce up.
GERD And Your Holiday Feast

GERD And Your Holiday Feast

2019-12-2200:13:15

During the holidays, reflux problems are magnified by big meals with trigger foods like chocolate and alcohol. But reflux sometimes doesn’t show up as heartburn. A gastroenterologist discusses reflux, how it may appear as asthma or hoarseness, and how it can be treated. Guest: Dr. Jeffrey King, Chief of Gastroenterology, National Jewish Health, Denver
  A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 22, 2019, including: A new study showing an injectable could be the answer for people with food allergies. Then, people suffering from depression may find some improvement by taking aspirin or ibuprofen. And finally, if you spend your workday wearing headphones, listening to music… you may be a lot less productive than you think.
The debate over vaccination isn’t as civil as it once was, and leaves little room for common ground or even discussion. Pro-vaccine advocates often point to science showing safety and effectiveness, but as a noted medical humanities researcher explains, values common among anti-vaccine advocates lead them to reject this science, and both sides need to understand where the disconnect comes from. Guests: Dr. Bernice Hausman, Prof. and Chair, Dept. of Humanities, Penn State Univ. College of Medicine and author, Anti-Vax: Reframing the Vaccination Controversy
Affluenza

Affluenza

2019-12-1500:10:40

http://traffic.libsyn.com/radiohealthjournal/RHJ_19-50B.mp3 Rich people receive deference that the rest of us don’t, but do wealthy kids grow up knowing they can get away with what others can’t? Research finds that all children apparently know this. Experts discuss. Guests: Dr. Suniya Luthar, Foundation Prof. of Psychology, Arizona State Univ. and Prof. Emerita, Columbia Univ. Teachers College. Maia Szalavitz, co-author, Born for Love: Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered
But a new study shows giving buses an inexpensive engine retrofit helps not only the health of students who ride them, but also their academic performance. The study looked at a variety of school districts over time and concluded that test gains from green buses were like going from a rookie teacher to one with more than five years of experience. Medical Notes 19-50 http://traffic.libsyn.com/radiohealthjournal/Medical_Notes_19-50.mp3 Medical notes this week… Alcoholic liver disease kills more than 20,000 people per year in the United States, but scientists may someday be able to treat it with something short of a liver transplant. A study in the journal Nature finds that when mice with alcoholic liver disease are treated with a bacteria-killing virus, their liver disease is wiped out. The virus targets a specific gut bacteria which produces liver-attacking toxins. Those bacteria are very numerous in people with alcoholic liver disease. Scientists say it’ll be some time before they can try the virus on people. If you want to keep the mind alive as you age, play games. A study in the Journals of Gerontology followed people from age 70 to 79 and found that those who played games like bingo, cards, crosswords and chess had less of a decline in thinking compared to people who didn’t play games. The effect was most profound in memory and thinking speed. Scientists are hoping to refine their study further to narrow down which games are best for the brain. And finally, school buses are among the oldest and most polluting vehicles on the road. But a new study shows giving buses an inexpensive engine retrofit helps not only the health of students who ride them, but also their academic performance. The study looked at a variety of school districts over time and concluded that test gains from green buses were like going from a rookie teacher to one with more than five years of experience.
Workplace Bullies

Workplace Bullies

2019-12-0800:17:31

http://traffic.libsyn.com/radiohealthjournal/RHJ_19-49A.mp3 Some bullies never grow up, and just keep on bullying. Experts describe where and how it most often occurs, what workplace bullies are seeking, who they target, why it continues, and what needs to happen to stop it. Guests: Dr. Ron Riggio, Professor of Psychology and Leadership, Claremont McKenna College Dr. Charles Sophy, Medical Director, Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services Dr. Gary Namie, Director, Workplace Bullying Institute
Older Dads, Younger Kids

Older Dads, Younger Kids

2019-12-0800:13:38

http://traffic.libsyn.com/radiohealthjournal/RHJ_19-49B.mp3 The average age when men first become fathers has risen to 31, and more men are also becoming dads in their 40’s and 50’s. A National Book Award-winning author discusses his experience as a first-time dad at 56, and now as a 73-year old father with teenagers. Guests: Tim O’Brien, author, Dad’s Maybe Book
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