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Radiolab

Author: WNYC Studios

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A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.
© WNYC Studios
218 Episodes
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In the No Part 2
In the year since accusations of sexual assault were first brought against Harvey Weinstein, our news has been flooded with stories of sexual misconduct, indicting very visible figures in our public life. Most of these cases have involved unequivocal breaches of consent, some of which have been criminal. But what have also emerged are conversations surrounding more difficult situations to parse – ones that exist in a much grayer space. When we started our own reporting through this gray zone, we stumbled into a challenging conversation that we can’t stop thinking about. In this second episode of ‘In the No’, radio-maker Kaitlin Prest joins us for a conversation with Hanna Stotland, an educational consultant who specializes in crisis management. Her clients include students who have been expelled from school for sexual misconduct. In the aftermath, Hanna helps them reapply to school. While Hanna shares some of her more nuanced and confusing cases, we wrestle with questions of culpability, generational divides, and the utility of fear in changing our culture.Advisory: This episode contains some graphic language and descriptions of very sensitive sexual situations, including discussions of sexual assault, consent and accountability, which may be very difficult for people to listen to. Visit The National Sexual Assault Hotline at online.rainn.org for resources and support. This episode was reported with help from Becca Bressler and Shima Oliaee, and produced with help from Rachael Cusick. Special thanks to Ben Burke and Jackson Prince.Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

In the No Part 2

2018-10-1900:39:0027

Baby Blue Blood Drive
Horseshoe crabs are not much to look at.  But beneath their unassuming catcher’s-mitt shell, they harbor a half-billion-year-old secret: a superpower that helped them outlive the dinosaurs and survive all the Earth’s mass extinctions.  And what is that secret superpower? Their blood. Their baby blue blood.  And it’s so miraculous that for decades, it hasn’t just been saving their butts, it’s been saving ours too.But that all might be about to change.  Follow us as we follow these ancient critters - from a raunchy beach orgy to a marine blood drive to the most secluded waterslide - and learn a thing or two from them about how much we depend on nature and how much it depends on us. BONUS: If you want to know more about how miraculous horseshoe crabs are, here's a bunch of our favorite reads:Alexis Madrigal, "The Blood Harvest" in The Atlantic, and Sarah Zhang's recent follow up in The Atlantic, "The Last Days of the Blue Blood Harvest" Deborah Cramer, The Narrow EdgeDeborah Cramer, "Inside the Biomedical Revolution to Save Horseshoe Crabs" in Audubon Magazine Richard Fortey, Horseshoe Crabs and Velvet WormsIan Frazier, "Blue Bloods"  in The New Yorker Lulu Miller's short story, "Me and Jane"  in Catapult MagazineJerry Gault, "The Most Noble Fishing There Is"  in Charles River's Eureka Magazineor check out Glenn Gauvry's horseshoe crab research database This episode was reported by Latif Nasser with help from Damiano Marchetti and Lulu Miller, and was produced by Annie McEwen and Matt Kielty with help from Liza Yeager.Special thanks to Arlene Shaner at the NY Academy of Medicine, Tim Wisniewski at the Alan Mason Cheney Medical Archives at Johns Hopkins University, Jennifer Walton at the library of the Marine Biological Lab of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Glenn Gauvry at the Ecological Research and Development Group.Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

Baby Blue Blood Drive

2018-08-2900:58:3948

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Comments (250)

Bill Graham

Azure

Nov 13th
Reply

Becca Hall

wow this episode is putting so much of my sex life into words #metoo

Nov 9th
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Becca Hall

Becca Hall I'm tearing up because I'm so happy that this discussion is happening in the public eye. thank you radiolab for being on the brink of change and escalating it

Nov 9th
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A. Cadena

I'm not an emotional person but this episode had me crying. it gives me hope that there's a better way. thank you for this episode!

Nov 9th
Reply

Becca Hall

This episode is great and has given me a lot of perspective on some sexual experiences I didnt want and how much coersion and emotional manipulation can affect me because of the way I have been brought up in society as a woman. MeToo

Nov 7th
Reply

Reza Rostampisheh

My comment concerns the first part of the show which talks about the decline of interest in living in a democracy within the 1st world countries. In my opinion, we're facing a generational challenge, when people live in a democracy generation after generation, the younger generations start to loose perspective not because they don't care, but because they don't have a sensible frame of reference for what could a less democratic society look like. No matter how many books and movies are made about what happened during the world war II and the rise of fascism, the 20 year olds today will have a pretty hard time relating and more importantly empathizing with what happened 70 years ago. I think just a quick look at the countries who are experiencing this shift may show, the more stable the country has been historically the faster the decline has occurred.

Nov 6th
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Ben Rust

Wow, all i got out of this is that Molly and her sisters are a bunch of horrible bigots!!! Its too bad she seemed so smart, but she obviously is not.

Nov 1st
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Elijah Claude

Wow, this was a really great and interesting series!! Frustratingly complex at some points... But very eye opening and thought provoking in many others. Thank you for this and sorry for the losers that think this is all a joke or stupid. I hope we can indeed make a meaningful change on this front sooner rather than later. It scares me so much that future kids would have to navigate through that mess... That my daughters would have to deal with such Grey communication resulting in stark damage.. Sigh. Hope we can make some real change!

Oct 31st
Reply

Charles Lawrence

this show is either really good or really bad. there is no in-between

Oct 28th
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Gabriel Adomaitis

To say that only women have been conditioned to determine that the sex is good if the other partner is enjoying it, is just wrong. I feel like since I have been sexually active ive always had this idea that if i finish before the woman i have failed as a sexual partner, that her pleasure comes before mine.

Oct 27th
Reply

Annette C

I see this story as an example of how both genders of us are confused about the issue of sex, when to engage, when to say "no" clearly, and how to hear it. I think women are confused, and I think men are confused. Some of the signals men have gotten from our culture about how to go about seducing a woman have contributed to the problem Some of the signals women have gotten from our culture about what is expected of them have contributed to the problem. I think this story illustrates this very well. Two good people tried to make something happen, but ended up ruining something instead. Shortly after listening to this podcast, I watched an episode of The Andy Griffith show. Barney Fife was on a double date with Andy, trying to force himself on his date in the back seat. The laughs came because he was unsuccessful. She fought him off and got out of the car. It was a non-issue. Made me cringe. No wonder we are so confused.

Oct 26th
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zippy zipster

yawn

Oct 26th
Reply

James Content

m8mo ..

Oct 25th
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Max Rempel

great topic, but the idea that the viral envelop was the origin of placenta is illiterate. of course other vital mechanisms could have played a role, but clearly placenta did not originate from the viral envelope. also i doubt fetuses poop.

Oct 23rd
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Chaddwic Shay

pretty razzed by this one. I may get it wrong, but she agreed she wanted to masturbate and simultaneously watch him masturbate. Fine. it progressed into sex from there. not honestly too surprising. But i find it disturbing she could now essentially turn it into a sexual assault simply because she is female. If Jay suddenly felt afterwards that he was pressured into it we wouldn't accept it from him. so why is it run of the mill for a woman to decide afterwards that it was unwanted? without a clear NO moment it becomes very difficult, for me at least, to determine fault IMO

Oct 23rd
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Becca Hall

Chaddwic Shay coersion is sexual assault

Nov 7th
Reply

Jeff Meyler

so if I decide to drink and drive and kill someone then I'm not responsible for their death because I was drunk?

Oct 22nd
Reply

Benjamin Brayley

Jeff Meyler Actually you would go to jail for that.

Oct 25th
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Eric Kleinwolterink

I miss Radiolab

Oct 21st
Reply

Peter Cappello

Ignoring the fact that this is far, far from science, this part of the series is significantly better than part 1(IMO of course). Excellent way to approach the topic, by having these two specific individuals. That being said, I find it lacking in many ways. I find it unfortunate that there was little attempt to force any degree of specificity on the subject. "i think there are very few of...", "i think it's a small percentage of women who would do...", etc. it becomes very clear that the woman advocating for the validation of feeling traumatized is bring traumatized has not thought about how her broad-strokes-ideas interact with real, tangible situations, but simply likes the idea that individuals need to have more "shameless conversations about sex". Only problem is, this will never happen to any significant degree in situations where these misunderstandings are most likely to occur - sexual contact between two individuals who do not know each other very well. She states she likes the idea of both needing to communicate "in the same language", but ultimately puts the final burden onto the male, because "pink dresses". Unfortunate, because Jad could have done very little talking and perfectly ensured the overlooked questions were answered.

Oct 20th
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Sarah Addy

I am glad Radiolab has decided to air this conversation on a topic everyone seems to be having in one way or another. I found the sides mirrored and expounded upon my debates and ruminations. While I am understanding of the criticism other listeners have as to how well this fits with the show and "science", I remain appreciative of the efforts and willingness of Radiolab creators to venture into these necessary and timely conversations.

Oct 20th
Reply

Boba F.

incredibly bummed to see this SCIENCE cast turned into a megaphone for hella unrealistic ONE SIDED conversations... jad didnt say shit during that entire episode.

Oct 19th
Reply

Becca Hall

Boba F. the entire episode is about talking to BOTH sides of the conversation. do you require a man's voice in order for it to be valuable for you?

Nov 9th
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H. Heath

The woman from the first episode is the reason why genuine victims go un-believed. Her assertion that if someone "feels" violated they WERE violated is such an affront to actual survivors (like I am). I wish Radiolab was not giving this woman so much air time.

Oct 19th
Reply
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