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“Live your truth.” “Follow your heart.” “God wants you to be happy.” “You only live once.”These phrases are more than empty platitudes. These nice-sounding lies are quickly becoming deeply held cultural beliefs that promise great freedom yet in reality heap up burdens we were not meant to bear.On this episode we welcome Alisa Childers back to the podcast. Alisa joined us previously on episode 34 to talk about so-called ‘progressive Christianity.’ This time we’re talking about her latest book "Live Your Truth (and Other Lies): Exposing Popular Deceptions That Make us Anxious, Exhausted, and Self-Obsessed."In this conversation we will talk about why catchy social media slogans are able to take root in our culture and in our churches, why these subtle lies bring us greater burdens rather than relief, and how we can escape false notions of what the Christian life looks like.Along the way we’ll also talk about the power and pitfalls of social media, the critical difference between subjective and objective truth, and whether or not women are especially targeted by the ‘believe in yourself’ version of Christianity._____________________________________________________________Be sure to check out the show notes and other resources for this episode at https://www.ReasonableTheology.org/YourTruth and learn more about Alisa’s work at https://www.AlisaChilders.com.  If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
How can you introduce the Christian faith to someone who thinks they already are Christian? My guest on this episode is from Mormonism Research Ministry, which is dedicated to reaching current and former Mormons with the true Gospel.Eric Johnson has been a student of Mormonism since 1987 and has written a number of books on this unique area of evangelism, including Sharing the Good News with Mormons which we had a conversation back on episode 5 of the podcast.His latest book is Introducing Christianity to Mormons: A Practical and Comparative Guide to What the Bible Teaches where he compares and contrasts Mormon views with the teaching of God’s Word.In this episode we’ll discuss how the doctrines of the Latter-Day Saints differ from Scripture, why a significant number of Mormons are not only leaving Mormonism but are abandoning religion altogether, and how we can effectively challenge their views with Scripture when they believe the Bible is true only “as far as it has been translated correctly.”We will also get into some of the very, very different theological views on God and Jesus Christ that Mormon missionaries typically won’t get into when they knock on your door and discuss a game plan for how we can witness to Mormons that we interact with.You can see the show notes with additional resources from this conversation at ReasonableTheology.org/Mormon If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
If you’ve been around Reasonable Theology for any length of time you’ll have gathered that I greatly admire CH Spurgeon and share resources from his extensive ministry often.So it is a great pleasure to welcome Dr. Geoff Chang to the podcast. Chang is curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and he’s the author of a new book Spurgeon The Pastor: Recovering a Biblical and Theological Vision for Ministry.In this conversation we’ll talk about how Chang became academically interested in Spurgeon, the purpose of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern, what Spurgeon was like as a pastor of a local church, and why he was able to avoid the pitfalls of being a celebrity pastor of a large church.Along the way we’ll discuss how Spurgeon was able to accomplish so much and how this larger-than-life figure from church history can still be an encouragement to pastors of small churches.___________________________See the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/PastorSpurgeonIf you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library. If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
John Calvin (1509-1564) is a man whose extensive theological contributions have impacted countless believers and whose name has become synonymous with Reformed Theology.But who was John Calvin and why did he dedicate his life to the preaching and teaching of God's Word? This brief biographical sketch will introduce you to this pastor, theologian, and Reformer.We'll Cover:Calvin's early lifeHow he was talked into ministering in GenevaHis later banishment from GenevaCalvin's time in Strasbourg and return to GenevaHis constant trialsJohn Calvin's continuing legacyFor more information on Calvin:John Calvin: Pastor, Theologian, ReformerThe Five Points of Calvinism: Defining the Doctrines of GraceCalvin's Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
Scripture tells us that believers are to "pray without ceasing." Yet many Christians recognize that their prayer lives are not what they would like them to be.So how are we to pray? Thankfully we aren’t left without an answer to that vital question.  Jesus taught His disciples how they were to pray, and this model prayer ⁠— commonly known as the Lord's Prayer ⁠— provides guidance to improve our prayer lives. In this sermon on Matthew 6:9-13 we'll examine and apply each element of the Lord's Prayer and see how we can use it as a model for our own prayers.See the full text of this sermon at ReasonableTheology.org/episode57 If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
As Christians, we benefit greatly from the ministry of our fellow believers – this includes those who lived long before our time. Thanks to their preserved writings, we can all learn from pastors, authors, and theologians from throughout church history and have our faith strengthened through their faithful lives.But even though these great works have stood the test of time and are readily available in both print and digital form, we don’t always make use of the storehouse of spiritual treasures we have access to.Our guest Jared Payne joins us to talk about how we can benefit from the written works of the Reformers, Puritans and others and how we can develop the habit of reading older works. Jared runs A Pilgrim’s Coffer Theology, which is dedicated to “urging the claims of Christ’s cause, advocating the revival of godliness, denouncing error, bearing witness for truth, and encouraging the laborer’s in the Lord’s vineyard.”We’ll talk about the value of older works and how they provide unique helps in our modern times. Along the way Jared will share some of his favorite works that he recommends all Christians read and you’ll come away with a solid list of books to add to your shelf.You’ll also learn of a digital tool that can grant you access to hard to find and out of print theological and devotional books completely free and learn about a new magazine that can help you expand your biblical and theological knowledge as well as your personal library with great works from the past.You can learn more and explore additional resources at ReasonableTheology.org/Pilgrim  If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
Every day it becomes more evident that our culture is actively and aggressively promoting ideas and agendas that go against God's Word. Whether it is abortion, gender issues, drugs, or other hot-button topics, those who hold to a biblical worldview are facing increasing pressure to compromise their beliefs to avoid being ostracized from society. With the news media, movies, music, sports, and just about everything else pushing an agenda that goes against Scripture, it is time for Christians to view themselves as rebels — rebels who stand for truth in a world gone mad. Listen as Sean McDowell shares why Christians must make bold stands for Jesus on controversial issues and how we can do so in a loving way. Sean is an author, speaker, and associate professor at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University. He’s authored or edited more than 18 books, including his latest book A Rebel’s Manifesto: Choosing Truth, Real Justice, and Love amid the Noise of Today’s World. On This Episode We’ll Discuss:Why standing for Christ makes us rebels in today's cultureWhy Christians need to speak into controversial issuesHow our view of God and His Word impacts how we engage with our cultureWays parents can prepare their kids to withstand the onslaught of anti-biblical viewsHow we can be both bold and loving as we make a stand for truthSee the Show Notes, Read the Transcript, and Watch the Video at ReasonableTheology.org/Sean If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
If you've sat under a good preacher or have opened a good commentary, you are aware that there is a depth to the original languages of Scripture that can sometimes be difficult to capture in our English translations.But have you ever considered learning biblical Greek or Hebrew yourself?Our guest today says this is not only highly beneficial for your study of Scripture but is also entirely possible - even if you are not a whiz with learning languages.His name is Ryan Martin and he is the founder and lead instructor for KairosClassroom.com, an online school that offers affordable and accessible courses in New Testament Greek and Old Testament Hebrew.Listen as we discuss the many benefits of learning a biblical language, why having a command of Greek or Hebrew is not as difficult as you might think, and tips for picking up a language more quickly.On This Episode We’ll Discuss:The value of learning a biblical languageWhy Greek and Hebrew are not just for pastors and seminary studentsHow you can learn a biblical language in as little as 3 hours a weekWhy learning Greek and Hebrew might not be as difficult as you thinkTips for learning a biblical language more effectivelySee the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/Episode53Use promo code THEOLOGY at KairosClassroom.com for 10% off your Greek or Hebrew classes! If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
If you spend much time on social media, you've likely come across RefToons - cartoons depicting figures from church history such as Calvin, Owen, Spurgeon, and many more.RefToons exists to preserve the legacy of theologians of the past by producing humorous and thought-provoking comic strips that bring clarity to various biblical teachings through visual storytelling.On this episode of the podcast we talk with Paul Cox, the artist behind RefToons, to learn about how his love for deep theology inspires his creative work.Along the way we'll also talk about the importance of church history, the value of catechisms, and which person is Paul's favorite one to draw.On this Episode We'll Discuss:How Paul became a cartoonistHow RefToons got its startThe impact older works from pastors and theologians have hadThe process of creating a RefToon comicWhy merging humor and theology is helpful in our social media ageThe importance of catechisms and how Paul's illustrated Baptist and Westminster Catechisms came to bePaul's favorite person to draw and what he hopes to create in the futureSee the Show Notes, including a video of our conversation and some of the RefToons comics at www.ReasonableTheology.org/RefToons If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
Jesus said "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest."Despite this wonderful promise, we often allow hurry and distraction keep us from spending focused time with Christ in prayer. How can we build discipline in this area and how can we grow in our prayer lives?On this episode we are joined by Asheritah Ciuciu as we discuss a pattern for prayer that can help you deepen your communion with Christ and resist distraction when praying.On this episode we discuss:How Asheritah's book seeks to help others develop the habit of daily prayerHow the acronym of REST can help us focus our prayers and take the time to be still before the LordWhat we learn about prayer by looking at prayers in ScriptureThe value of praying through passages in the BibleHow we can cultivate the discipline of prayer in our personal lives and in our homesSee the Show Notes and Transcript at ReasonableTheology.org/Rest If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
The subject of sin is not a comfortable topic for study or discussion. Even so, there is great value in understanding the problem of sin, as it is by having a right understanding of the problem we are able to effectively fight against it and appreciate what Christ has done for us.On this episode of the podcast we are joined by Mark Jones, who uses his knowledge of the works of the Puritans to guide others into a greater understanding of the problem of and solution to our indwelling sin.Mark Jones is the author of the book Knowing Sin: Seeing A Neglected Doctrine Through The Eyes Of The Puritans.I trust that you will find this conversation an encouragement to renew your fight against sin while relying more fully on the finished work of Jesus Christ to do so.On This Episode We’ll Discuss:Why Mark wanted to write a book on the topic of sinHow the Puritans can help us better understand our sinfulness and Christ’s provision for our weaknessParticular Puritan works that we can all benefit fromHow the average Christian misunderstands sinThe differences between sins of omission and sins of commissionHow having a greater understanding of sin deepens our Christian lifeEncouragements we have from Puritan works for fighting sinSee the show notes, additional resources, and a full transcript at ReasonableTheology.org/KnowingSin If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
There is no joy on Easter Sunday without the sorrow of Good Friday. There is no resurrection without the cross. And there is no salvation without them both. Without the events of Sunday morning the events of Friday afternoon were merely a terrible tragedy.The cross was necessary, as it was here Christ bore the wrath of God against sin and took the full weight of its punishment so that our debt of sin against God could be paid in full. Romans 5:10 says “while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son.”The Resurrection was necessary, for a dead Savior cannot save anyone. As we read in Romans 4:25, Christ “was delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification.”That Christ rose from the dead three days later proves that His sacrifice for sin was accepted by the Father and that Jesus truly has power over both sin and death. The Resurrection proves that Jesus is who Scripture says He is!Listen to this sermon on Matthew 28 to gain a fuller appreciation for the reality of the Resurrection, the reactions people had and have to this reality, and the right response to the truth that Jesus Christ rose from the dead.See the full transcript of this episode at ReasonableTheology.org/Easter If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
This is a 'best of' rebroadcast of the most popular episode of the podcast last year.  If you missed it, you'll want to listen to this conversation with Dr. Ray Rhodes Jr about the love story of Charles and Susie Spurgeon.In 1871, Charles Spurgeon wrote to his wife, Susannah "My Own Dear one - None know how grateful I am to God for you. In all I have ever done for Him, you have a large share. For in making me so happy you have fitted me for service. Not an ounce of power has ever been lost to the good cause through you. I have served the Lord far more, and never less, for your sweet companionship. The Lord God Almighty bless you now and forever!"On this episode of the podcast, Dr. Ray Rhodes, Jr. returns to the podcast to talk about his new book, Yours, Till Heaven: The Untold Love Story of Charles and Susie Spurgeon.On this episode we'll discuss: How Charles and Susannah first metWhat their courtship looked like in Victorian EnglandHow Susannah adjusted to life with the famous preacherSusannah's contributions to Charles' ministryHow Charles ministered to Susannah in their homeThe lasting lessons we can take from their marriageSee the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/Episode38 If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
The reliability of Scripture is among the most important truths that the field of apologetics deals with. In this radio interview I discuss four important areas of evidence to be familiar with when defending the Bible's authenticity.Listen as we talk about why we can trust that our Bibles have been faithfully preserved from the original writings until now.On This Episode We’ll Discuss:The vast number of early manuscripts we have - Scripture is by far the best attested of all ancient writingsThe archaeological support of Biblical people, places, and eventsHow  we know the writings were faithfully preservedWhen the New Testament accounts were written (and why that matters) Listen & See the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/reliable If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
In John 14:13-14, Jesus tells His disciples: “Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it.”John 16:23 says “In that day you will ask nothing of me. Truly, truly, I say to you, whatever you ask of the Father in my name, he will give it to you.”Believer it or not, there are some who misuse these verses!In fact, there are several ways we might misunderstand and misuse praying in Jesus’ name.The first is the most obvious, and that is to treat God as our own cosmic concierge who is obligated to do our bidding whenever we use the magic phrase, “In Jesus name, amen.”But the other way we misunderstand praying in Jesus' name is to simply tack this phrase onto the end of our prayers out of mere tradition and filler words at the end of our prayers.We don't want to do either of these things.In this radio interview I discuss what it means to pray in Jesus' name and how these truths should impact our prayer lives.Read more at www.ReasonableTheology.org/Pray If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
In the 2nd chapter of Luke’s gospel we find the familiar passage recounting the birth of Jesus and the angelic announcement of “good news of great joy” to the shepherds keeping watch over their flocks by night.As remarkable as this passage is its familiarity can cause us to look without seeing and hear without listening. When we come to familiar passages in our Bibles we have a tendency to read quickly over them, assuming that we have gained as much as we can from them already. And so my hope is that we will approach these verses – as much as possible – with a fresh perspective, eager to take in all of the wonder and amazement that we ought to have as we reflect on the truth that God took on flesh and dwelt among us. Let us behold the wondrous mystery that the 2nd person of the Trinity would condescend to be made in the likeness of sinful flesh and enter the world in such humble fashion. That while we were still enemies with God He came to seek and to save that which was lost.May we never lose sight that He is Savior. He is the Christ. He is the Lord.And as we keep these remarkable truths before us, we will be unable to do anything other than gaze upon our Savior in wonder; to eagerly share the good news of great joy with others; and to praise, glorify, and worship Christ our King. Listen & See the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/Episode47 If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
Every pastor knows the unique challenges of facing critics in their church. The question is, how should they respond to criticism?On this episode of the podcast we are joined by Nick Thompson, who is the pastor of Cornerstone Presbyterian Church in Chattanooga, Tennessee and co-author with Joel Beeke of the book Pastors and Their Critics: A Guide to Coping with Criticism in the Ministry.Listen in as we discuss how pastors can lovingly respond to critics, learn from constructive criticism, and withstand unjust criticism in the church.On This Episode We’ll Discuss:The danger of pastors not being prepared for and not knowing how to respond to criticsPlaces in Scripture we see leaders face criticismThe role critics play in the sanctification of the pastorPractical ways that pastors and ministry leaders can respond wellWhy criticism isn’t always a bad thingHow pastors can become resilient to criticism without hardening themselves against helpful feedbackHow we as believers can be encouragers of our pastors rather than discouragers Listen & See the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/critics If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
After more than 2000 years, Jesus Christ remains the most influential figure in all of human history – even by secular standards! Examining the impact that the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus has had on the world is helpful in establishing the reliability of the events recorded in the Bible. In fact, you can confirm the historicity and deity of Jesus from history alone, without relying on the New Testament manuscripts.Join former detective J. Warner Wallace and me as we discuss the incredible impact of and the undeniable evidence for the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.On This Episode We’ll Discuss:How J. Warner Wallace went from homicide detective to Christian apologistWhat the phrase “person of interest” means in police work and in relation to JesusHow a “no body” investigation mirrors the investigation into the resurrection of JesusWhy Wallace’s “fuse and fallout” approach helps validate the claims of the GospelsThe importance of historical records outside the BibleWhy every believer should be familiar with common objections to ChristianitySee the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/Episode45 If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
The preaching of the Word of God is a vital means of edifying, equipping, and encouraging believers and proclaiming salvation to the lost. But much of what passes for preaching in our day fails to stay tethered to the truth Scripture and instead focuses on man's ideas and methods.This is why expository preaching, or the comprehensive explanation of a Bible passage in which the text dictates the content of the sermon, is so vitally important. It is Scripture that "is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness" (2 Timothy 3:16), and so the task of the preacher is not to entertain or provide his wisdom but to explain and expound the text.Listen as we talk with Pastor David Strain about the importance of expository preaching and how we can grow by sitting under good preachers.On This Episode We'll DiscussWhat expository preaching is (and isn't)Why expository preaching is the most helpful means of preachingHow our view of Scripture impacts our idea of what "good preaching" isHistorical examples of great expository preachersContemporary examples of great expository preachersHow we all can get more out of the sermons we listen to on SundaysSee the Show Notes at ReasonableTheology.org/Episode44 If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
In this 5 Minute Friday episode, I'll share a 3-step process I learned from one of my seminary professors. This process, he joked, was a secret that could save you $36,000 and several years of effort by eliminating the need for a master’s degree in counseling.The “secret” 3-step process is simple. It is to guide the conversation through three phases: External, Internal, and Eternal.Learn more here: https://reasonabletheology.org/a-3-step-process-for-having-spiritual-conversations/ If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show
Comments (1)

Timothy Lark

I wish I knew of more podcasts that increase your biblical knowledge like this one. Awesome thank you

Aug 26th
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