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Reporters Without Orders

Reporters Without Orders

Author: Newslaundry.com

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Young Reporters talk about major stories of the week and what it took to cover them. Click here to support Newslaundry: http://bit.ly/paytokeepnewsfree

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

155 Episodes
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In this episode, host Ayush Tewari is joined by Newslaundry’s Akanksha Kumar and Anna Priyadarshini.The conversation starts with the reporters sharing the bizarre news stories of the week, from an Indonesian woman claiming a gust of wind made her pregnant to the Indian higher education regulator UGC asking universities to encourage students to write a “cow science” examination.The discussion begins with Anna’s report on the verdict in BJP leader MJ Akbar’s defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani. Akanksha then talks about her experience covering the ongoing farmer protest at Singhu on Delhi’s border. On how the farmers plan to adjust their protest to the approaching summer and their apprehensions about the new agriculture laws, she says, “Another fear they have is that with the entry of private players contract farming may result in some sort of exploitation. Their fears are not completely unfounded, they do have a basis.”Akanksha also talks about her story on Dilbag Singh, a farmer from Pubjab who cycles around the Singhu protest to lift spirits. Ayush then moves to Anna's report investigating Rinku Sharma’s death at Mangolpuri which the Hindu nationalist ecosystem has sought to communalise. Anna shares her experience covering the story and what the people there felt about the reporter’s presence in the area.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! RecommendationsAkanksha Newslaundry Investigation: Reality of ‘Love Jihad’ in KanpurReturn From ISISAnna To the Harvey Weinsteins of the world by Priya RamaniAyush Reporter: A Memoir by Seymour M. Hersh See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, Nidhi Suresh takes over as host and she’s joined by Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari.Nidhi asks Ayush about his coverage of the farmer protests at Ghazipur and Singhu. Ayush notes that in Ghazipur, the resentment of sugarcane farmers is “driving them” to protest sites. “The andolan, the movement, has very successfully sucked up all the resentment and turned it into energy to run these protests,” he says.Ayush also talks about his reports from western Uttar Pradesh, the role of the Tikait brothers, and the mahapanchayats organised to discuss the farm laws. Nidhi spotlights the protests in Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and Punjab, saying: “The sort of resentment is coming from the way the law was pushed in as an ordinance, the way they haven’t been heard. This sort of movement is also really asking the government to fix their relationship with the farmers.” She and Ayush also contrast the protests with what it was like to report on the Delhi riots.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari, Basant Kumar, and Nidhi Suresh to discuss the ongoing farmer protests and the events that unfolded after the tractor rally on January 26. Basant describes the absurdity of the police barricading Singhu border. “What can be more bizarre than being there, and feeling as if we’re standing at India’s international border with so many BSP and CRPF officers guarding it?” he asks. “Tall, newly-constructed cement walls and ghastly nails affixed on the road..." Nidhi explains how the police have barred journalists from entering the protest site. She then talks about a help desk set up by a lawyers’ collective under the Samyukt Kisan Morcha that tracks protesters who have gone missing since Republic Day. “It’s a really big task,” she points out, “because it’s such a large protest.”  Nidhi also talks about how a lawyer was reportedly told by the police to file an RTI to get a copy of an FIR filed in the context of the protest. “As per law, you are supposed to be handed the FIR copy,” she says. “And if you are a lawyer, you have to get it.” The panel also discusses the attacks on journalists, the citizens’ march in support of the farmers, the internet shutdown at protest sites, and how the government is using Covid as a “double standard”. All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have.Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry  correspondents, Nidhi Suresh and Basant Kumar, along with producer Aditya Varrier to discuss their experiences while reporting from the farmers’ tractor rally on Republic Day.  Nidhi, Basant, and Aditya begin with a chronological lowdown of how events unfolded on January 26. Nidhi describes the confusion on the ground succinctly when she says, “ We were receiving news on social media that tear gas shelling has started but protestors on ground were still appealing  to the larger group to maintain peace.” Having been to the protest over five times, Aditya talks about the changing geography of the protest sites over time, and new developments such as markets and museums.Basant, meanwhile, highlights the ineptitude of the Delhi police saying, “Police preparedness on the Delhi borders was marked by just a few barricades.” He also describes the events that led to the first direct violent interaction between the police and the protestors. He witnessed the clashes unfold first-hand as tractors rammed into barricades.He also shares his account of the violence at the Red fort where journalists were attacked and police and protestors were injured. While doing so Basant reaffirms that Indian flag was not insulted in any way whatsoever. For Nidhi the change in the nature of the tractor rally was simple but unpredictable as she navigated through it. She expresses how, given the size of the rally, it was unfair to expect protestors to have consensus on all aspects of the protest. However, the panel agreed that while the  violence was condemnable, it cannot be a metric to delegitimise the demands of the farmers. The panel also discusses the circumstances and consequences of the death of a protestor at Delhi’s ITO, the lack of responsibility amongst stakeholders, and the future of the farmer protest. All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have.  Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, the host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari to discuss the television ratings scam and the WhatsApp chats between Republic TV’s editor-in-chief Arnab Goswami and Partho Dasgupta, the former CEO of Broadcast Audience Research Council (BARC).Ayush begins by pointing out that the chats revealed something that everyone already suspected—that behind all the nationalistic clamour on Indian television news, there is nothing but a network of opportunists and middle men who line their pockets and buy influence.Through the length of the discussion, Ayush cites his recent media reports and goes on to highlight how BARC, a government-mandated body, has been compromised at different levels. From Republic TV and Zee reaching millions of viewers illegally to a former minister in the information and broadcasting ministry allegedly “keeping aside” a multi-crore complaint against Republic TV, Ayush explains just how deep-rooted the corruption is. The duo also discuss the most shocking and the funniest bits of the WhatsApp chats.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, the host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and Ayush Tiwari.From a buffalo’s funeral in Meerut to BJP MP Hema Malini’s ignorant comments about the farmers -- the trio share a few laughs talking about the most bizarre news stories they heard during the week. The conversation then moves to the farmer protests. Snigdha shares the latest updates including the Supreme Court-appointed committee to resolve the crisis, which in turn brings her to the objections raised against it.Based on their report, Ayush and Basant highlight how each of the four members of the committee appointed by the apex court have, in the recent past, publicly expressed their support for the three contentious farm laws. Basant also talks about the Bhartiya Kisan Union and its various factions. The trio discuss how the state and a section of TV media has pushed farmers into a corner.Apart from the farmer protests, the panel also discusses Uttar Pradesh government’s advertorial in TIME magazine’s India edition and how a section of Indian media ran it as a report. In relation to the same, Ayush and Snigdha also discuss the evolving use of press releases over the years. All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, the host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and Akanksha Kumar.The conversation starts off with some bizarre news stories and quickly moves to Basant’s report on the association of right-wing groups with most cases registered under the new anti-conversion law in Uttar Pradesh. The discussion then shifts to Akanksha’s report on how a local right-wing body disrupted a consensual interfaith marriage in Lucknow. The triad discusses the role of local fringe groups before and after the new law came to be.The three also talk about the farmers' protest and Basant’s report on the 12 farmer groups who extended support to the new agriculture laws. “Five  out of 12 farmers associations were directly connected to BJP,” says Basant.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Not a single year goes by when some part of our country is struck by a natural disaster. This year was no different, with floods, cyclones, droughts, and wildfires. Add to that the Covid-19 pandemic.In this episode, the host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Assam correspondent, Supriti David, to discuss the devastating annual floods in Assam caused by the Brahmaputra river. Supriti covered a stretch of over 1000 kms across the banks of the treacherous river to document the aftermath of the floods. She begins by giving some background on the nature and duration of the floods. On the government’s outlook towards the annual floods, Supriti points out: “What the government and the people affected have in common is that they’ve accepted this for what it is: a natural disaster. They think that because it cannot be prevented, the damage that accompanies it cannot be mitigated, but that’s not true.” Supriti recounts how among the villages that she visited, none of the residents had a good word to say about the government response to the annual calamity.The duo also discuss the consequences of the floods in multiple villages across Assam’s districts. In case of Borphalang village, Supriti describes how it remains submerged and cut off from the rest of the region for half the year.Supriti’s in-depth ground reports, which are a part of the Newslaundry Sena ‘Disastrous Consequences’ project can be found here. All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have.  Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, the host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Nidhi Suresh and The Hindu’s Uttar Pradesh correspondent, Omar Rashid.The conversation starts off with the panelists sharing the strangest news stories they heard during the week. They then move on to discuss what the bogey of Love Jihad really means? “Basically it’s a political lie created by the right-wing to criminalise the behaviour of Muslim men when it comes to their interaction with Hindu women,” says Omar. The trio also discuss, in detail, the recent case in Moradabad where an interfaith couple were held under Uttar Pradesh’s new anti-conversion law despite repeatedly stating that the marriage and conversion was consensual. Nidhi and Omar, who covered the story from the ground, describe their experience and highlight the lapses and contradictions in the case. On the role of the media in propping up the narrative of ‘love jihad’, Omar says: “I feel the media really plays a big role to send a message to the larger audience that something like this exists and to define their biases, their prejudices and conservative practises into a very well formulated idea called Love Jihad.”All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and Anna Priyadarshini.The conversation hits off with the bizarre news stories, from a fisherman finding the world’s biggest blob of whale vomit worth 2.4 million pounds to a wife of a dead Patiala man receiving a ‘sample-collected’ SMS on her husband’s phone.The discussion begins with Anna and Ayush’s report on ex-soldiers at the farmer protests denouncing the Naxal jibes at them by Union Minister Piyush Goyal. Last week, the minister had alleged, without evidence, that the ongoing protests against the new farm laws had been infiltrated by “Naxal and Maoist elements”. A section of the media too had claimed the protests had been “hijacked by anti-national forces” and “foreign powers”. The most apt response to the allegations was from a 75-year-old former subedar of the Indian army, Joginder Singh, who said “Narendra Modi and Amit Shah were children when we fought wars for this country. So if they call patriots like me Naxali, then why should we even answer them? It is like mocking a priest about his mantra. Or lecturing a farmer about agriculture, as they’re doing. They should be ashamed of themselves.”With the fall in Delhi’s temperature and the subsequent rise in the number of deaths associated with the farmer protests, Snigdha moves to Basant’s report. Basant gives the example of Shri Krishnalal, a 65 year-old accountant who died in front of Niranjan Singh Dhola, the Punjab Secretary of Indian Farmers Union (Rajewal). So far, at least 20 people associated with the protests have died.Based on his interaction with the agitating farmers on the ground, Basant says they are prepared for anything coming their way. He adds, “The farmers don't mind dying. They’ve taken the issue to heart.”Anna weighs in and says, “When we spoke to these ex-servicemen, they described it as their last war. One of them said, we don’t have anything to lose ‘ab toh jeet ke hi jaana hai.’ That's what they said and that was obviously echoed throughout.”This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Supriti David and Scroll’s Arunabh Saikia . Through the length of the episode, the panel discusses the Baghjan oil field fire in Assam, its consequences and the role of Oil India Limited.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and Nidhi Suresh. Through the length of the episode, the panel discusses several aspects of the farmers’ protest. They shed light on the media’s coverage, the farmers’ perspective, the role political parties are playing, and the steps taken by the government to resolve the issues.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari and Akanksha Kumar “if you give birth to a girl, we will not let you or her stay alive.” This is what young Pappi Devi’s in-laws told her before she and her newborn baby girl died in Uttar Pradesh’s Lakhimpur Kheri district. The conversation begins with Akanksha narrating the young woman’s story and the mysterious circumstances surrounding their deaths. Questioning why no arrests have been made in the case till date, she talks about how the victim’s family had to file 15 complaints before an FIR was registered four months after the incident. Akanksha and Ayush both term Uttar Pradesh as an “absentee state”. Next, Ayush talks about his report on the sudden shut down of HuffPost India. He labels it as “dramatic” and goes on to add that the website may be the first “casualty” of the new FDI scheme launched by the current government for digital media organisations. The new policy restricts foreign investment in Indian digital media to 26 per cent. Snigdha points out how this further reduces the space for independent media in the country. Lastly, the panel discusses Ayush’s second story, on Sudarshan News’s show ‘UPSC Jihad’. Ayush explains how the show propagated a conspiracy theory on the infiltration of Muslims in the Indian bureaucracy. He talks about how the Supreme Court ordered the show to be taken off air, saying it is “in bad taste and there is a likelihood that it would produce communal attitudes.” The panel also calls out the government for deflecting responsibility and unfairly restricting the digital news space instead. All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari and Nidhi Suresh. The conversation begins with Ayush’s report on the Broadcast Audience Research Council and why its audience measurement system is “rotten”. The panel discusses how BARC’s functioning and systems are “highly manipulative” and “not accurate”. On the organisation suspending TV news ratings for three months while it “reviews protocols”, Ayush says: “India’s premier TV audience measurement agency needs to put its house in order, and a three-month suspension of TRPs will not cut it.”The discussion moves on to a report by Nidhi and Newslaundry’s Akanksha Kumar on the rape and murder of a three-year-old in Uttar Pradesh’s Lakhimpur Kheri. Nidhi brings up the flaws in the system, such as how there’s only one forensic lab in the entire state. On covering three rape cases in Uttar Pradesh, she says, “What struck me was that no one there was as shocked as I was after hearing about these cases, as if it happened a lot, or it was normal.”All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and BBC’s Neeraj Priyadarshi.The conversation begins with the Bihar election results, and Basant describes his experience of covering the election on the ground. Throughout the election, he says, people made their discontent clear against the Nitish Kumar government.“I was wrong when I thought that this time, the election was just about real issues. But no, this year again, it was about caste,” he adds. “Despite so many issues remaining the same in Bihar for the last 15 years, people did vote on the basis of caste.”Neeraj explains how women votes helped the NDA gain a majority in Bihar. Though people were not happy with Nitish, he says, Bihar’s women voted for him because of the reforms Nitish brought in for them. “Women have Nitish’s back,” he says. He also believes that after Nitish’s tenure, Bihar has good youth leaders, ready to step in.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Basant Kumar and Prateek GoyalThe conversation hits off with the arrest of Arnab Goswami by Mumbai police. For the first time in the country, some of the most important ministers of the union cabinet came together and called for press freedom to condemn the event. Considering the numerous incidents of journalists being harassed for doing their job that did not see public denouncement from anyone from the government, Snigdha asks if press freedom in India is selectively applied. In the same context, Snigdha brings up a recent case involving two reports by Newslaundry’s Prateek Goyal about one of Maharashtra’s leading media houses Sakal Media Group and how it had sacked its employees in violation of a government directive to not terminate workers during the pandemic. After the publishing of two reports, Newslaundry was slapped with a sixty five crore rupees defamation notice along with an FIR against Prateek. Prateek goes on to divulge the details of the case and how the Pune police have been harassing him, visiting his home unannounced and attempting to seize his laptop. Snigdha asks Prateek about press freedom in India, and he says, “No matter which political party it is, they react if someone opposes them or raises their voice against their wrongdoings.” Snigdha then moves on to discuss Basant’s coverage of the Bihar elections, focusing on the second phase of the polls. Basant talks about his report on the sugar mill of Motihari, where farmers and workers have been waiting years for their pending dues. Highlighting the problems that farmers face, Basant says, “All the farmers in Bihar are worried. If the going of grains is Rs 1800 per quintal, here farmers can’t even sell it for Rs 1100-1200 because there’s no MSP system in Bihar.” He also talks about how agriculture, one of the most important concerns for voters in Bihar, has barely featured as a key issue during these elections.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Akanksha Kumar and Ayush Tiwari.From a warmongering senior politician from Uttar Pradesh to a recently-formed “nationalist” digital media association, the conversation hits off with some bizarre news stories.The discussion moves on to Uttar Pradesh’s Lakhimpur Kheri--a place that has recently gained notoriety for crimes against women, especially minors from socially disadvantaged communities. In the month of August, within a span of twenty days, at least three incidents of rape and murder of minors belonging to the Dalit community were reported from the region. Newslaundry reporters Akanksha Kumar and Nidhi Suresh visited Lakhimpur Kheri to report on the issue. Referring to her report on the first case involving a 13-year-old girl, the most heart wrenching part, Akanksha says, was when the victim’s mother said, “I was sleeping, otherwise I would’ve gone with her.”Akanksha goes on to talk about her report on the second case involving a 17 year-old victim. She draws parallels and points to the differences between Hathras and Lakhimpur Kheri cases in terms of caste divide. Joining the conversation, Ayush observes, “Covering such stories like Hathras and Lakhimpur Kheri, it seems that the field (agricultural), khet jisko kehte hai, in rural India is such an unsafe space for women.”Snigdha then moves on to discuss Ayush and Sukriti’s NL Sena report on Delhi police’s probe into the murder of Ashfaq Hussain, Mehtab Khan, and Zakir Ahmed. Snigdha asks Ayush what he, as a reporter, draws from the experience of consistently following one story as in this case. He says, “So when we look at these riot stories, they are all different in their own ways. But they all say something about the kind of world we live in. Talking further, Ayush points towards the lack of substantial evidence against Mohammad Arif, the accused in the case. He adds, “It was pretty clear through these eye witnesses that this man is being framed in this case. But what everyone would tell you about Arif in Brijpuri is that he is a BC. I didn't know what this BC was so I asked them. BC refers to ‘Bad Character’ or history-sheeter, in other words. This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Newslaundry’s Nidhi Suresh and Basant Kumar.The conversation begins with Basant’s coverage of the Bihar assembly election. Despite the incumbent government’s claims of making bihar free of open defecation, Basant points out how, barely 500 meters from the deputy chief minister’s house, the residents of a Dalit colony are forced to defecate in the open. Basant goes on to explain how big a role caste plays during elections in Bihar. He also points towards the neglected health infrastructure in the state with an example of a government hospital in CM Nitish Kumar’s home district, Nalanda.The discussion then moves to Nidhi's report from Delhi's Model Town, where a Dalit girl was found dead in her employer’s home. Just like in the Hathras case, her body was cremated forcefully by the Delhi police at night, against the family’s wishes. Nidhi sheds light on the police’s abominable behaviour and why the victim’s relatives have been alleging rape and murder.All this and a lot more as they talk about what made news this week, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Gaurav Sarkar, Senior Reporter at Mid-Day, along with Newslaundry’s Akanksha Kumar.The conversation hits off with the bizarre news stories, from Jeff Bezos’ New Shephard to the Tanishq ad controversy.The discussion then moves on to the TRP scam. Gaurav says a certain section of the media, however small, including Newslaundry, should pat themselves on the back for calling out big brands for finding hate-ridden news. He says, pointing to the broader picture, that the TRP scam is an offshoot of the events that preceded the entire fiasco: the SSR case. He talks about how some news channels turned SSR’s death into a joke, politicised it and then came their “Trump card, “miss loose cannon Kangana.”Then comes the latest in the Hathras case and how the family of the victim is being hounded by the media. Akanksha tells Snigdha about the ugly exchange that happened between the victims' relatives and the media. Referring to her report, she says, “One must also remember that there are certain media houses who have been looking for some or the other conspiracy theory in the case and also trying to rule out the caste angle. Whereas when you go to the ground, the build up to the crime can be explained only through the prism of caste.”Snigdha moves on to discuss Gaurav’s report on Tarun, a 17-year-old autistic child from Colaba who got lost in a crowd and never returned. Gaurav highlights the gross negligence by the police and the Railway Police Force in the case. After a year, as the case gets colder, the family still has not given up hope. “It’s a story that, I think, social media can eventually solve. My faith in this particular case lies in the power of social media because we’ve seen what it can do from the Baba Ka Dhaba case” he says.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have. Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
In this episode, host Snigdha Sharma is joined by Damini Kain, a student activist and academic researcher on issues related to caste and gender, along with Newslaundry’s Ayush Tiwari and Nidhi Suresh.The conversation begins with UP government’s denial of rape in the Hathras case. Nidhi begins the discussion by highlighting, on the basis of medical records and other evidence, how the no-rape claim does not hold. “Something that's become very evident through the research is that firstly this was not an inevitable death. This was simply not prevented, it was just not taken care of, nobody was there for her, nobody attended to her on time,” says Nidhi.While the incident has shockwaves throughout the nation, Damini who hails from western Uttar Pradesh herself, tells Snigdha about how government’s and the police’s response when it comes to crimes against  the Dalit community are evasive to the extent of being oppressive . She says that the nexus of  upper caste dominance even in the Hathras case is a reflection of how Dalit women are treated, even by law-makers. Ayush draws out the ridiculousness of Uttar Pradesh Police’s “international plot to defame UP government” claim. He adds more context to the discussion on crimes against women in Uttar Pradesh. In a recent report, he pointed how the Adityanath government has trying to protect bureaucrats who in turn were accused of protecting Kuldeep Singh Sengar, the former BJP MLA from Unnao sentenced to life in prison for raping a minor. Coming back to the dynamics of caste in rural and urban areas, Damini says that we shouldn’t reduce the discussion just to atrocities against Dalits but also how caste functions on a day-to day basis. She shares a recent report that shows how caste dominates Indian cities. “We need to come to a meeting ground that can be established when enough representation is given to people from all marginalized communities,” she adds.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn’t, and what shouldn’t have.Tune in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Comments (32)

Rahul Kapoor

lvl of journalism ia degrading everywhere, left or right. Same here in this podcast.

Dec 5th
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Rahul Kapoor

Whosoever that dude was citing TCS ex is a classic idiot. You cannot compare a private setup with govt functioning. PWD for ex requires physical presence of employee for the work to be done. Newslaundry k dhobiyon pls do your homework properly

May 30th
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Ishan Chawla

unable to find the podcast on google podcast has this been removed?

May 15th
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Pratap Nair

A podcast not to be missed every week. Newslaundry.com us really worth subscribing. Great work 👍

May 8th
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Rahul Kapoor

What a bunch of jokers you guys are. I dont ever watch republic, but the way you guys are defending action against Arnub, shows your bigotry. And pls reqesting host to not appear such dumb

May 2nd
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Rahul Kapoor

Basant grow up buddy, lot og pople dress for meetings like this

May 2nd
Reply

Akash Gupta

please add recommendations in podcast show notes for later reference.

May 2nd
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Akash Gupta

we should tweet bomb them with the same question the journalist asked!!

May 2nd
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Akash Gupta

one of the best episode so far.

Apr 17th
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Rahul Kapoor

Innocent peacefuls attacked due to illiteracy... ohoo too sad newslaundry’s dhobis are very hard working

Apr 12th
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Rahul Kapoor

ironic, being a journo you are asking the audience to connect dots. Are you trying to imply things without conclusive proof?

Mar 29th
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Rahul Kapoor

lvl of their IQ can be gussed by when the host says o yaa he was found positive he didnt show any signs ooyaa just imagine

Mar 22nd
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Rahul Kapoor

hahaha.. a diff set of ppl saying Qouran mei corona toh likha hua hai.. apne logon ka bhi thoda pata kar liya karo yar Hamida ji.. ya allah brand ka sanitizer mullon ki brkthru khoj hai

Mar 22nd
Reply

Rahul Kapoor

please share the evidence you have against delhi police and file a case in high court

Mar 19th
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Rahul Kapoor

i will recommend this poscast to all so that everyone should be aware of how paid journalism sounds like

Mar 19th
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Rahul Kapoor

can't help but think of the title.. 3 idiots

Mar 8th
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Rahul Kapoor

💩Reporters and 💩 reporting 🖕🏼

Mar 2nd
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Rahul Kapoor

Man feel like puking hearing their journalism such biases bc unsubscribed

Mar 2nd
Reply

Rahul Kapoor

My god ypu assholes are actually trying to spinoff and deflect blame from tahir and want police action on people putting tilak. Fuccking loosers

Mar 2nd
Reply

Akash Gupta

nicely reported but I senses a subtle biasness.

Dec 22nd
Reply
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