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Road to Resilience

Author: Mount Sinai Health System

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Stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the best experts in the world.
67 Episodes
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Is it better to be self-critical or self-compassionate? Until 20 years ago, when Kristin Neff, PhD, began pioneering the empirical study of self-compassion, most high-achievers would likely have answered “self-critical.” Indeed, being hard on yourself can seem like the path to success. But Dr. Neff’s research has shown that self-compassion is actually the surer and healthier road. In this interview, Dr. Neff explains what self-compassion really means—hint: it’s not for the faint of heart—and how it supports mental health. She also describes “fierce” self-compassion, in which kindness toward ourselves becomes a force for change in the world. Kristin Neff, PhD, is Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her new book is Fierce Self-Compassion: How Women Can Harness Kindness to Speak Up, Claim Their Power, and Thrive.Links:Self-Compassion.orgThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth
Beyond Sleep Hygiene

Beyond Sleep Hygiene

2021-05-2521:59

Like exercise and nutrition, sleep is central to good health. And yet, so many of us—Road to Resilience producers included—don’t get enough high-quality sleep. So we called sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, MD, for advice. Dr. Pelayo is the author of “How to Sleep: The New Science-Based Solutions for Sleeping through the Night." In this episode, he explains how sleep keeps us resilient and offers science-backed tips that go beyond “sleep hygiene.” We also talk about Ancient Egyptian dream chambers, dreaming robots, napping, mattresses, and more!Rafael Pelayo, MD, is a Clinical Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Division of Sleep Medicine.Links:The Mount Sinai Integrative Sleep CenterDr. Pelayo’s official bio“How to Sleep” by Dr. Rafael Pelayo
Wise Up

Wise Up

2021-05-1324:36

Sociologist Monika Ardelt, PhD, has spent her career studying an ideal that’s as universal as it is elusive: wisdom. And like many wisdom researchers, she’s concluded that we don’t necessarily become wiser as we age. Many people even become less wise. It’s a troubling thought, not only because wisdom is associated with resilience and life satisfaction, but also because if we’re not becoming wiser, what exactly are we becoming? Dr. Ardelt explains why wisdom matters and offers thoughts on how to cultivate it, including in moments of adversity.Monika Ardelt, PhD, is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Florida.Links:Dr. Ardelt’s official bioThe Office of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth
Toxic Apocalypse

Toxic Apocalypse

2021-04-2828:17

We’re in the midst of a fertility crisis. Worldwide fertility has dropped more than 50 percent in the past 50 years, and the decline shows no sign of slowing. Shanna H. Swan, PhD, a leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologist, has spent more than two decades studying the impact of environmental chemicals and pharmaceuticals on reproductive tract development and neurodevelopment. In this episode, she explains how endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as phthalates and BPA, are harming fertility and endangering the future of the human race. It’s scary stuff, but it’s too important to ignore. And, as Dr. Swan explains, there are steps we can take to protect ourselves and our children.Shanna H. Swan, PhD, is a Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Her new book is called “Count Down."Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links“Count Down” by Shanna H. Swan, PhD Resources for reducing your chemical exposure The Institute for Exposomic Research (Mount Sinai) Children's Environmental Health Center (Mount Sinai)New research challenging some of Dr. Swan's conclusions (The New York Times)
If you live in a WEIRD society—Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic—chances are you aren't getting enough exercise. And it's not because you're bad or lazy; it's because you're normal. On this episode, Harvard paleoanthropologist Daniel E. Lieberman, PhD, explains how evolution designed humans to avoid unnecessary physical activity, i.e. "exercise" in the Western sense. In his new book, "Exercised," he busts 10 common myths about sleep, sitting, and physical activity, using the latest scientific research. If you've ever wondered whether sitting is the new smoking, or if you're getting enough sleep or exercising enough, this episode is for you.Dr. Lieberman is the Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links:"Exercised" by Daniel E. Lieberman, PhDMount Sinai Orthopedics Division of Sports MedicineRehabilitation and Human Performance at Mount SinaiSports Medicine Fellowship at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
The Man Box

The Man Box

2021-03-3028:23

Ted Bunch is co-founder of A Call to Men, an organization dedicated to preventing violence against women and promoting healthy manhood. Mr. Bunch is also co-author of "The Book of Dares," which contains 100 challenges for boys based on the work of A Call to Men.Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.Links:A Call to Men"The Book of Dares"Mount Sinai Parenting Center
Good Trouble

Good Trouble

2021-03-1622:52

Author, speaker and podcast host Luvvie Ajayi Jones shares tips for conquering fear and making good trouble. “Facing fear is absolutely a muscle,” Ms. Ajayi Jones says. “Being courageous is literally a moment-by-moment decision.” Her new book is "Professional Troublemaker: The Fear-Fighter Manual."Help shape the future of Road to Resilience by taking our listener survey.For more on facing fears, check out Episode 24 "The Gospel of Curtis" with NFL legend Curtis Martin.Links:"Professional Troublemaker: The Fear-Fighter Manual"Mount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthOffice of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

2021-03-0220:56

Yvette Calderon, MD, MS, understands why vaccine hesitancy remains stubbornly high in communities of color. Growing up in New York City’s projects, she heard stories of forced sterilization in Puerto Rico and saw the medical system put other families first. Now Dr. Calderon finds herself on the flip side of the coin, trying to persuade reluctant colleagues and community members to take the COVID-19 vaccines. With the United States passing 500,000 pandemic deaths, including her father, Dr. Calderon argues that the vaccines are key to our resilience and shares advice for meeting hesitancy with compassion, enthusiasm, and science. Dr. Calderon is Chair of Emergency Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel.Also in this episode: Justine Sarkodie, 17, talks about how COVID-19 transformed her West Bronx community and what she's learned about neighbors' attitudes toward the vaccines. Ms. Sarkodie is a senior at the High School for Health Professions and Human Services.LinksYvette Calderon, MS, MD official bioCOVID-19 Vaccination Information and ResourcesJustine's survey on vaccination hesitancy (for New York City residents)Road to Resilience listener survey"COVID Vaccination in Pregnant and Breastfeeding Individuals" (Dr. Calderon refers to this YouTube video)Mount Sinai Beth Israel Emergency DepartmentMount Sinai Office for Diversity and InclusionHigh School for Health Professions and Human Services (HPHS)
Sharon Salzberg was one of the first to bring meditation and mindfulness into mainstream American culture beginning in the 1970s. She's a co-founder of The Insight Meditation Society in Barre, MA, and the author of eleven books, including the New York Times bestseller, Real Happiness. Her podcast The Metta Hour, features interviews with leaders in the mindfulness movement. She recently released “Care for Caregivers,” a series of eight guided meditations aimed at helping caregivers build resilience, available online and on a dedicated app. In this interview, she explains what mindfulness is and isn’t, and lays out how it can help caregivers become more resilient.Take our listener survey to help us bring you more resilience insights!LinksCare for Caregivers (mindfulness-based resilience techniques)Care for Caregivers smartphone appMount Sinai CalmOffice of Well-Being and Resilience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiMount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal Growth
PTSD, Meet MDMA

PTSD, Meet MDMA

2020-12-2927:10

Rachel Yehuda, PhD, has been at the forefront of trauma research and treatment for three decades. Her pioneering work with populations including military veterans and Holocaust survivors has illuminated the biology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite scientific advances, PTSD remains difficult to treat. Even “gold standard” cognitive-behavior approaches are ineffective for too many patients. In this interview, Dr. Yehuda talks about the therapeutic potential of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy and describes her journey from skeptic to advocate for more research.Dr. Yehuda is Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, and Director of The Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is also the Vice Chair for Veterans Affairs in the Department of Psychiatry as well as Director of the Traumatic Stress Studies Division. LinksThe Center for Psychedelic Psychotherapy and Trauma Research (http://bit.ly/3nOhWgN)Yehuda Lab (http://bit.ly/38BV7Xj)Five Things to Know About MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD (http://bit.ly/37SoeXh)Mithoefer, M.C., Feduccia, A.A., Jerome, L. et al. MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD: study design and rationale for phase 3 trials based on pooled analysis of six phase 2 randomized controlled trials. Psychopharmacology 236, 2735–2745 (2019). (https://bit.ly/3rHu5Xk)
When COVID-19 hit back in March, Brendan Carr, MD, MS, was the first person we turned to. He oversees emergency rooms at Mount Sinai's eight hospitals. And when we spoke, Dr. Carr was in battle-mode, facing a poorly understood virus that threatened to overwhelm the U.S. health care system. Nine months later, in the midst of a third wave and with vaccinations underway, we asked Dr. Carr for his reflections on fighting a once-in-a-century pandemic.Dr. Carr is System Chair of Emergency Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System. Full bioGet the latest on COVID-19 vaccines:https://www.mountsinai.org/about/covid19/vaccine-informationCOVID-19 Facts and Resources:https://www.mountsinai.org/about/covid19If you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
With COVID-19 vaccines providing light at the end of the tunnel, we catch up with ICU nurse Jessica Montanaro, MSN, RN, nine months after our first interview to find out how she's doing, what she's learned this year, and how she and her team are fighting the pandemic's third wave. Ms. Montanaro is Assistant Nursing Care Coordinator, Medical Surgical Trauma ICU at Mount Sinai Morningside.Get the latest on COVID-19 vaccineshttps://www.mountsinai.org/about/covid19/vaccine-informationCOVID-19 Facts and Resourceshttps://www.mountsinai.org/about/covid19Mount Sinai Morningside: https://www.mountsinai.org/locations/morningsideIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
The real story of how medicine moves forward, one smart person at a time. A new podcast from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.Listen and subscribe on your favorite podcast app.https://realsmartpeople.buzzsprout.comIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts.Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about Road to Resilience on our website.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Theater of War

Theater of War

2020-11-1841:06

How can Ancient Greek tragedies help communities build resilience in the face of stress and trauma? Since 2009, Theater of War Productions has used this “ancient technology” to break cultures of silence and spark cathartic conversations. They've performed for soldiers, prison guards, front-line health workers, and many other audiences. In this interview, artistic director Bryan Doerries explains how each performance, which consists of a reading by A-list actors followed by a candid audience discussion, can open a door to healing.Theater of War Productions: https://theaterofwar.comUpcoming shows: https://theaterofwar.com/scheduleIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Over the past few months, physician assistants (PAs) at Mount Sinai have been engaged in a lively discussion about resilience. Their goal: To process their COVID-19 experience together and share strategies for managing feelings of stress, grief, and even guilt. In this episode, two PAs and a clinical social worker talk about why they joined the 11-week resilience workshop and what they’ve learned. Whether or not you’re a healthcare worker, there’s plenty of food for thought here.Links:Mount Sinai Center for Stress, Resilience, and Personal GrowthThe Office of Well-Being and ResilienceWell-Being ToolkitDepartment of PsychiatryNYC WELL“Psychological distress, coping behaviors, and preferences for support among New York healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic" (article)If you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Cancer is Me

Cancer is Me

2020-10-2123:10

Tanya Bhatia has had breast cancer for much of her adult life. Her first diagnosis, at age 23, took her by surprise and left her isolated and depressed. “I never wanted to have that experience again,” she recalls. So when her second diagnosis came, she chose to handle it differently. “I’m going to live my life, and I’ll just add chemo to my routine.” Now 33 years old and battling metastatic, triple-negative breast cancer, Tanya shares how she manages the “routine” of living with a life-threatening illness. It’s a fascinating conversation about coexisting with the knowledge that life is fragile and unpredictable.Links: Amy Tiersten, MD (Tanya’s Breast Oncologist)The Dubin Breast Center - Cancer TreatmentThe Tisch Cancer InstituteIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
It was a dark and stormy night … Judith Hunt, 80, slipped and fell rushing down a dark hallway. She wound up in the hospital with a broken hip. It was the beginning of a medical odyssey that would include heart surgery, bowel surgery, and a brush with COVID-19. In this episode, Judith talks about facing death with grit and gallows humor, and the small moments that made her recovery possible.Links: David A. Forsh, MD (Judith’s orthopedic surgeon)Malcolm Reid, MD, (Judith’s rehabilitation doctor)Yamilette Burgos-Quinones, MD (Judith’s rehabilitation doctor)Gabriele Di Luozzo, MD (Judith’s cardiologist)ABC 7 Story on JudithIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
As a teenager, figure skater Gracie Gold won two US National titles and an Olympic bronze medal. But then depression, anxiety, and an eating disorder forced her to withdraw from competition and seek treatment.In this interview, Gracie talks about the pitfalls of pursuing Olympic glory, and how the same qualities that made her an elite athlete also made it hard to spot red flags. “I will just keep going in a way that's admirable until it's destructive,” she says. After a life-threatening mental health crisis in 2017, Gold learned to reject toxic positivity and take a more balanced approach to life. As for her goal of competing in the 2022 Olympics, she says, “This time it's not the fear of failure driving me. It's the pursuit of excellence.”From the postponement of the 2020 Olympic Games, to social isolation and anxiety, the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on elite athletes’ mental health. A recent HBO documentary film, “The Weight of Gold,” spotlights those struggles and features interviews with Gracie Gold, Michael Phelps, Lolo Jones, and other Olympians.Links: "The Weight of Gold" (HBO Sports Documentary) Behavioral Health at Mount SinaiAmerican Foundation for Suicide PreventionCrisis Text LineThe National Alliance On Mental IllnessIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Our Better Angels

Our Better Angels

2020-09-1113:29

Machismo almost killed Neil Carroll. Growing up in the Bronx in the 1970s, he was taught that when bad things happen, real men suck it up. So after experiencing trauma in the Air Force, instead of looking for help, Neil turned to drugs and alcohol. “I had all the wrong coping mechanisms,” he recalls. Then came 9/11 and a host of new challenges, including cancer. To survive, Neil would have to rethink what it means to be a man.Links World Trade Center (WTC) Health ProgramMount Sinai Selikoff Centers for Occupational HealthUmut Sarpel, MD (Neil’s Surgical Oncologist)Federal WTC Health ProgramFealGood FoundationIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
Autism has always been a part of Alison Singer’s life. When she was a little girl in the 1970s, she would visit her older brother, who has non-verbal autism with a cognitive disability, at the now-infamous Willowbrook State School on Staten Island. “I just remember hearing a lot of screaming and moaning,” she recalls. “I hated it.” By the time Alison’s first daughter, Jodie, was born with severe disabilities in the late 1990s, society and autism science had evolved, thanks to parent-activists like Alison’s mother. But there was still so much work to be done. Alison quickly became an advocate in her own right. In 2009, she co-founded the Autism Science Foundation, which funds autism research. In this interview, Alison is joined by her daughter, Lauren, an undergraduate at Yale University, who has also devoted herself to improving our understanding of autism and designing interventions to help people with autism thrive. Together, they reflect on their family’s story, including how they’ve turned love and adversity into advocacy, and what they’ve learned along the way.Links: The Seaver Autism Center for Research & Treatment at Mount Sinai 24th Annual Advances in Autism Conference (Sept. 17, 2020)Alexander Kolevzon, MD (Jodie’s doctor)Autism Science FoundationIf you're enjoying Road to Resilience, please review us on Apple Podcasts. It helps new listeners discover the show. Thanks!Sign up for our monthly newsletter.Learn more about the podcast on our homepage.Feedback and guest suggestions welcome! Email us at podcasts@mountsinai.orgRoad to Resilience is a proud production of the Mount Sinai Health System.
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