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Scale Your Small Business

Scale Your Small Business

Author: Jillian Flodstrom

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The Scale Your Small Business Podcast helps entrepreneurs and small business owners put simple systems in place to see exponential growth. It’s hosted by serial entrepreneur, Jillian Flodstrom. If you need help mitigating the feelings of overwhelm and confusion when it comes to leading and growing your business this show will help you calm the chaos, increase productivity and grow your revenue.
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This week, Jillian is tackling overwhelm. So many people are finding themselves with too much on their plate, not enough hours in the day, and become paralyzed by the number of tasks that pile up, seemingly out of nowhere. But, there is light at the end of the tunnel, and today we’re talking about systems that can get you through your day.    Before we dive into Jill’s Get Clear System, it’s always important to remind ourselves that ‘no.’ is a complete sentence all by itself. Not every ‘no’ needs an explanation.    The first step in the Get Clear System is Collect. This step has different sub-steps to it, one being getting a planner or notebook and filling it with every meeting, sticky note, thought, whatever it is you have in your brain. Then, put everything into your current, up to date calendar so nothing slips through the cracks. Gather everything into one space.   The second step is List. In this step, you’ll want to list out everything that you gathered in your last step. Don’t worry about organizing it and give yourself time to list things out--you’ll probably come up with a few things after a while of wringing out your brain.    Three, Evaluate. This is a big one. Within this step, you’re first going to go through your list and itemize it by anything that has a firm, date, deadline, anything that makes you money, or any tasks that you can accomplish in less than two minutes. For those tasks that take over two minutes, we're going to formulate a system that will help you through that task. From there, you’re going to engage. Do you need to reach out to any members of your team? Add to your team? If these are big tasks, consider delegation. Then, estimate. Take a hard look at that task and give yourself an estimate of how long you think it will take to complete.   The fourth step is Act.  That means go through your list and do everything that takes two minutes or less. Next, delegate anything that is outside of your skillset. Then, schedule any remaining tasks on your calendar. When you schedule things and stick to them, sometimes you’ll get a bonus if you complete a task sooner than you thought it would take.   The final step in Get Clear is to Review. Did you reach your goal? And if not, how much closer did you get? What worked and what didn't? What do I need to improve on? How do I feel about my progress?    Any new system is going to take a little while to adjust to, but be cognizant of those feelings, allow them to be felt, and see what you can do to improve in the future. Don't just try something once and give up. This is the long game. So just like if you were training for a marathon, you wouldn't give up after your first mile. Key Takeaways:   Get Clear: Collect, List, Evaluate, Act, Review. ‘No.’ is a complete sentence all by itself. Not every ‘no’ needs an explanation.  Any new system is going to take a little while to adjust to. Be cognizant of those feelings, allow them to be felt, and see what you can do to improve in the future.
This week on the Scale Your Small Business Podcast, Jillian is breaking down best practices for storing, sharing, and saving important information. In a professional world increasingly dictated by technological advancement, it’s crucial that you stay ahead of the curve when it comes to taking care of your business’s virtual and online data. Let’s talk about some of the easiest tools you can employ today to get started.    There are a few different possibilities for sharing and saving files for your business, the two most helpful being G-Suite and Dropbox. Today, we’re going to focus on Dropbox.   While Dropbox has a free version, the paid option has a fair share of beneficial aspects that you may find useful. This version allows you to easily recover deleted, manipulated, or otherwise messed-with files. No matter what happens, you are always in control of your data.   Dropbox also has some solid security, but always remember to do your own research first. Dropbox offers a dual authentication service that will prompt anyone signing in or out to use two forms of identification to authorize their login. This way your files stay secure, especially if you have a large team all over the world.   Also helpful if you have a large team, remote or not, is how easy it is to share files. You can download them in different places, make edits, upload data for your team or for your review, and more. Dropbox is also available offline. That means all your files are available anytime, anywhere.    Everything on Dropbox is saved to the cloud, which makes your files safer, more accessible, and easier to use. If you’ve got multiple devices, you can download them or access them online depending on your hard drive space. You can upload from any device as well!   Key Takeaways:   Dropbox allows you to easily recover deleted, manipulated, or otherwise messed-with files. No matter what happens, you are always in control of your data. Dropbox also has some solid security, offering a cloud-based saving method and a dual authentication service. If you have a large team, remote or not, Dropbox makes it easy to share files. You can upload or download from many different places. It’s available offline, which means all your files are available anytime, anywhere.
Thanks for joining us for this week’s episode of the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. The journey of building and scaling a business is filled with a few dangerous pitfalls that can spell doom for your business. However, it’s certainly possible to get ahead of those problems and prepare yourself and the work you do so you can grow rapidly, and in a healthy way.    The first challenge you may have to overcome is identifying busy work vs. productive work. Are you actually accomplishing tasks, or are you occupying yourself with things that could wait? Constantly reorganizing and being in a state of perpetual adjusting simply won’t pay the bills. Focus on what you need to first, otherwise you can create a bottleneck and slow the entire process of growth.    Another mistake that you may encounter is simply networking too much. Overnetworking can happen easily, but it’s important to recognize that this too can become busywork. Consider if the networking you’re doing is moving the needle. Don’t get sucked into situations where you are providing more than you’re getting from things like networking groups, etc.   Another thing--don’t expect your employees to love your business the same way you do. It’s your baby, it’s your blood, sweat, and tears. They may not understand that. Communicate with them the importance of the work they're doing and it’ll go smoothly.   Make sure you’re not spending money without realizing it. Check your accounts regularly and ensure that you know where your money is going. Avoid paying subscriptions you no longer use and disallow things to slip through the cracks.    Try not to use your personal cell phone for business work. This opens a pandora’s box of problems that blur the line between your home and work life.    Your business needs to be able to run without you there. Don’t wait for an accident or emergency to test it. Delegate, delegate, delegate. Allow and trust your team to perform the tasks your business needs to survive at the same quality you would if you were there. Key Takeaways:   Identify busy work vs. productive work. Are you actually accomplishing tasks, or are you occupying yourself with things that could wait?  don’t expect your employees to love your business the same way you do. It’s your baby, it’s your blood, sweat, and tears. They may not understand that. Your business needs to be able to run without you there. Don’t wait for an accident or emergency to test it. Delegate, delegate, delegate.
  Thanks for joining us on another episode of the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. This week, we’re going to take a close look at scaling your business and brand through social media. It can be a daunting task to dive into, but with the right mindset and proper preparation, you can make an impact.    The number one thing to remember when you’re jumping into a presence on social media is to be consistent. Yes, you can plan for things, but plans change. What makes the difference is being active, engaged, and having a steady flow of content for your audience.    Sometimes you want to be that picture-perfect person for social media. Remember that you can’t compare yourself as a beginner to someone who is much further along than you are. What matters is that you’ve started your social media journey and you’ll improve with time.    Be kind to yourself. The social media world can be a cruel and occasionally unforgiving space. There are a few things to do here. First, have a plan for when that happens, don’t forget that some people just aren’t happy in their own lives and that your content is being seen by a ton of people. Try to meet that energy with kindness and you’ll get a long way.    Work out a process, kinks and all, and repurpose content to make sure you’re posting as much as is needed for your brand. Chop up other things you’ve done into bite-sized, social media-able pieces.    Don’t feel like you need to use every single social media platform out there. It’s much more effective to find where your audience is and learn that space inside and out. For example, Instagram has many different forms of content you can put out, which allows you to post multiple times in a day (if you have the content).    In the end, create something that is yours. Whatever it is you do, whoever it is you are, don’t be afraid to share it. Chances are, people will connect with what you have to say and relate to your experiences.    Key Takeaways   Be as consistent as possible on social media. Post engaging content actively!   Be kind to yourself. Don’t compare yourself to others and give yourself a break if you see any nasty comments.    Create something that is yours. Whatever it is you do, whoever it is you are, don’t be afraid to share it.
This week on the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with Jillian Flodstrom, Jillian is answering the question: “how do I give back to my business?” Often, entrepreneurs may have an aversion to posting about giving back on social media out of fear of being misinterpreted and coming off as shallow. But in reality, there is a lot that goes on behind the scenes that should be praised and replicated. Let’s talk about some ways you can start doing just that.   First, offer your services to the community. There are lots of ways you can do this--you can give back monetary donations, volunteer your time, or volunteer your employees time and pay them for it. In many ways, volunteering is more valuable, in that you are connecting with your community in relation to something you’re passionate about. Allowing your employees to volunteer and get paid is a win-win. Your community gets the benefit of volunteers and your employees get to feel good about what they’re doing while still getting paid.    Secondly, consider signing up for events as a company. It could be as small as picking up trash along the road, or as large as a fundraising event like a fun-run. The point is, you’re building a closer relationship with your team and the community you work in and serve.    Third, allow local nonprofits and charities to advertise in your business. This could be as simple as a poster in your window, or putting a Toys for Tots box in your lobby. Something that you know is going to make an impact that you have the resources to provide your community. Fundraise with and for these organizations and encourage other businesses in your community to do the same.    You’d be surprised at how much help these organizations could use, so rallying around them is always a good thing.    Key Takeaways   Offer your services to the community. There are lots of ways you can do this--you can give back monetary donations, volunteer your time, or volunteer your employees time and pay them for it.   In many ways, volunteering is more valuable, in that you are connecting with your community in relation to something you’re passionate about. Allowing your employees to volunteer and get paid is a win-win.   Consider signing up for events as a company. It could be as small as picking up trash along the road, or as large as a fundraising event like a fun-run. The point is, you’re building a closer relationship with your team and the community you work in and serve.    Invite local nonprofits and charities to advertise in your business. This could be as simple as a poster in your window, or putting a Toys for Tots box in your lobby. Something that you know is going to make an impact that you have the resources to provide your community.  Fundraise with and for these organizations and encourage other businesses in your community to do the same. You’d be surprised at how much help these organizations could use, so rallying around them is always a good thing.    LINKS   If you're an entrepreneur or small business owner and are looking to calm the chaos, increase productivity and grow your revenue, I want to give you a special invite to request a free strategy call with me by visiting scaleyoursmallbusiness.org/freecall. 
Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. Today, Jillian is going to share a few of her personal strategies that have made an immediate impact on both her professional and personal lives. From the tactical to the intangible, there are plenty of small changes and pivots you can make to see real growth.   Jillian’s first tip is that you get one day to wallow. Whatever happens or has happened to you, whether it makes you upset, angry, or some concoction of negative emotions, you get exactly 24 hours before you need to start searching for a solution. This is a short amount of time, and may not fit into every circumstance, but the point is that you give yourself a limit before you start to pick yourself up and start again. These feelings shouldn’t, and won’t stop you.    Second, develop a routine. Having a set series of things you do every day helps keep your business, mind, and body running smoothly. It can help you gear up for a big day, brainstorm, or clear your head. Either way, make sure you have a process and stick to it.    Third, be kind to yourself. You may be doing something you’ve never done before, facing challenges you haven’t seen yet, or overcoming a difficult hurdle. Offer yourself some grace. It’s easy to beat yourself up over every moment of the day, but understand that you are always learning, always growing. That’s what matters.   Fourth, set achievable goals and take breaks. Consider blocking your goals out in chunks. Start small and get the little things done--they add up. Once you start achieving, you get into a flow and achieving becomes a habit. Before you know it, you’re moving forward and hitting every mark.    Fifth, write everything down. Every random thought, idea, question, or answer that pops into your head should go down on paper of some sort. It’s easy to convince yourself you’ll never forget, but when the time comes, it’s safer to have it in front of you. Get a cute notebook you know you’ll love carrying with you!   Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Believe or not, there is probably someone out there who can do something better than you--and that’s okay. If you find yourself stuck and try to power through, you’ll end up burning out fast.    Key Takeaways   You get one day to wallow. Whatever happens or has happened to you, whether it makes you upset, angry, or some concoction of negative emotions, you get exactly 24 hours before you need to start searching for a solution.    Develop a routine. Having a set series of things you do every day helps keep your business, mind, and body running smoothly. It can help you gear up for a big day, brainstorm, or clear your head.   Be kind to yourself. You may be doing something you’ve never done before, facing challenges you haven’t seen yet, or overcoming a difficult hurdle. Offer yourself some grace.   Set achievable goals and take breaks. Consider blocking your goals out in chunks. Start small and get the little things done--they add up.   Write everything down. Every random thought, idea, question, or answer that pops into your head should go down on paper of some sort.   Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Believe or not, there is probably someone out there who can do something better than you--and that’s okay.    LINKS   scaleyoursmallbusiness.org/freecall
This week, we are going to break down a few of the most useful, most effective, and easiest to use backend systems that you can implement and see an immediate impact on your business. There are plenty of important front-end, client-facing processes, but without a solid foundation behind the scenes, you may not be getting the most out of your business. Let’s talk about it.    The first backend system we’re going to touch on is appointment software. Having consistent, clear appointment scheduling software is essential for the growth of your business. Scrambling, ‘surprise’ visits, or missed meeting all together can negatively affect your work in multiple ways. Calendly and AppointmentCore offers systems that allow you to have a clear flow of appointments.    Next is texting software. Texting software allows clients to text a business phone number versus having to have a personal cell phone always in use. This way, you can have the same phone number clients can call or text without purchasing an entirely new phone line.    CRM’s are massively important, but be sure to choose one that is a good fit for your business. Think ahead and adapt to your business’s future growth and make sure you already have a system that you won’t have to replace multiple times as you expand. You can go big with something like Infusionsoft, or start simpler and more affordable with MailChimp.    File sharing in a quick, efficient way is a great way to boost productivity within your business. Using Dropbox or G Suite allows you to instantly share files of any size and encourage collaboration across the board.    Communication is paramount in any business, as it facilitates every inner working of what you do. Slack is a professional, clean instant messenger that your employees can use for quick, efficient communication in an individual or group setting. It alleviates email inbox clutter and on the whole, makes life a whole lot easier.    Password protection software may be the single most important investment you make for your business. 1Password and LastPass give you the ability to share a confidential password quickly, and revoke privileges if necessary. Keep your business safe!   Finally, having a team Kanban board software like Asana lays out projects clearly, step-by-step, and with assignments. With Asana or Trello, you can have multiple things going on, but it’s all there for you to look at without being overwhelming. This software prevents all those small things from slipping through the cracks.    Key Takeaways   Having a consistent, clear appointment scheduling software is essential for the growth of your business. Scrambling, ‘surprise’ visits, or missed meeting all together can negatively affect your work in multiple ways.  Texting software allows clients to text a business phone number versus having to have a personal cell phone always in use. This way, you can have the same phone number clients can call or text without purchasing an entirely new phone line. CRM’s are massively important, but be sure to choose one that is a good fit for your business.  File sharing in a quick, efficient way is a great way to boost productivity within your business. Using Dropbox or G Suite allows you to instantly share files of any size and encourage collaboration across the board.  Maximize internal communication and alleviate email inbox clutter with Slack, a professional, clean instant messenger that your employees can use for quick, efficient communication in an individual or group setting. Password protection software may be the single most important investment you make for your business. 1Password and LastPass give you the ability to share a confidential password quickly and revoke privileges if necessary.  Having a team Kanban board software like Asana lays out projects clearly, step-by-step, and with assignments. This software prevents all those small things from slipping through the cracks. 
Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. Today’s topic is an important one--transitioning your in-person business to be fully or partially virtual and online. This can be a daunting task, but we’re going to run through some actionable tips that will help smooth out the process and result in more business and less stress for you and your operation.    First, consider getting a business phone number. Having an online VoIP allows you to keep your work and professional lives separate, have someone on your team handle calls when you aren’t available, and makes it easy to manage relationships. By having a separate number, you’re able to establish a number that you can whole-heartedly say is always available for your client’s use without guilt. You can even answer that number on the same phone through an online app!   Second, focus on text and email. These forms of communication are often quicker, clearer, and easier for your clients. Sometimes, folks don’t need an entire phone call--they may just need a fast answer between meetings. Texts and emails should move up on your priority list, as it’s an effective way to manage client relationships. By going one step further and getting an automatic texting platform, you can also let them know automatically if there may be a delay in your response. These platforms also allow you to see the text or email in many different forms.    Third, think about online scheduling. While it can seem scary at first, online scheduling allows clients to schedule, move, and cancel appointments themselves, saving you a ton of time. It will send you an email and automatically update your calendar so you can use your valuable time working on something other than dozens of short phone calls.    Key Takeaways:    Consider getting a business phone number. Having an online VoIP allows you to keep your work and professional lives separate, have someone on your team handle calls when you aren’t available, and makes it easy to manage relationships.   Focus on text and email. These forms of communication are often quicker, clearer, and easier for your clients. Sometimes, folks don’t need an entire phone call--they may just need a fast answer between meetings. Texts and emails should move up on your priority list, as it’s an effective way to manage client relationships.   Think about online scheduling. While it can seem scary at first, online scheduling allows clients to schedule, move, and cancel appointments themselves, saving you a ton of time.
This week, we’re answering the question “what is an LLC?” An LLC, or limited liability corporation, is one type of legal entity that can be formed to operate your business.  It can certainly be intimidating to consider making this switch, but it's important that you know what it is. Today, we’re going to break down the pros and cons of becoming an LLC.    As we saw before, an LLC is or limited liability corporation is one type of legal entity that can be formed to operate your business. LLCs are popular because they provide the same limited liability as a corporation, but are easier and cheaper to run. If you're starting a business or currently running a business as a sole proprietor, you might consider forming an LLC. This is especially true if you are concerned about limiting your personal legal liability, as much as possible.    First, let’s go over the benefits of starting an LLC for your business.   Number one is personal asset protection. As its name states, an LLC provides you and/or your business owners with limited liability. That means that you, the LLC owner, are generally not personally liable for any debts incurred by your LLC business or most business-related lawsuits. Because you're not personally liable, creditors or people who file lawsuits against your LLCs can't collect against your personal assets, like your personal bank accounts, personal car loans. They're limited to collecting your LLC's assets, like the LLC's bank account.   The second benefit of an LLC is pass-through taxation. The profits or losses that the business incurs pass through the business to the owner's personal tax return, such profits are taxed under the owner's personal tax return. Single-member LLCs are usually taxed the same as sole proprietors. The owner reports the LLC's profits, losses, deductions, or schedule Cs and files it with his or her personal tax return. An LLC with two or more members is usually treated as a partnership for tax purposes. The profits or losses are reported on the owner's personal tax returns and taxed at their personal rates. Because LLCs are usually pass-through entities, their owners can qualify for special pass-through tax deductions. This deduction took effect in 2018 and is scheduled to continue through 2025. Again, consult your tax professional for specifics, anything to do with tax laws. One note about taxes: LLCs can also choose how they want to be taxed. They are usually taxed as sole proprietorships or partnerships, but multi-member LLCs or sole proprietor LLCs have the option of choosing to be taxed like a corporation. This is easily accomplished by filing a document called an election with the IRS. With corporate taxation, the corporation pays taxes on the business profits at the corporate tax rate. With S-corporation treatment, the LLC remains a pass-through entity with profits passed through the business to the owners to be taxed at their individual tax rates. But such distributions are not subject to social security and Medicare taxes.   Number three, simplicity. An LLC is the simplest business entity to form and operate. Unlike with a corporation, it's not necessary to have officers, directors, a board or shareholder meetings or other administrative burdens that sometimes come with having a corporation.   Fourth is flexibility. LLCs provide enormous flexibility when it comes to ownership, management, and taxation, there's no minimum or maximum limits on the number of owners, also called members. Many LLCs only have one member, like me, but an LLC can have five, 10 or hundreds of members. LLCs can be managed by their members, that is, all the owners share responsibility for the day-to-day running of businesses. They also have the option of designating one or more managers to run the business. Managers can be designated members, non-members, or a combination of anything in between.   Forming an LLC to own and run your business helps give you credibility, it reassures customers that yours is a real business. You'll also have an official name to use!   Now, let’s talk about some possible downsides to an LLC.   Number one: cost. It generally costs more to form and operate an LLC than to just be a sole proprietor or a partnership. Filing fees must be paid to legally establish the LLC. Although not legally required, it is highly desirable for LLCs to adopt a written LLC operating agreement, laying out how the LLC will be governed. Once the LLC is formed annual fees and taxes will be paid to the state. This can vary from state to state, so again, check with your expert team and your state laws.   Number two is investment disadvantages. LLCs are not ideal for business owners who seek outside investors. This is particularly true if you're looking for funding from venture capitalists who ordinarily will only fund corporations. Corporations work best for outside investments because stock can be issued in exchange for investor’s money. Outside investors can invest in LLCs and receive LLC ownership interests, but this can be more complicated than with a corporation.   Key Takeaways   Pros of LLCs:   Personal Asset protection. As its name states, an LLC provides you and/or your business owners with limited liability. That means that you, the LLC owner, are generally not personally liable for any debts incurred by your LLC business or most business-related lawsuits.  Pass-through Taxation. The second benefit of an LLC is pass-through taxation. The profits or losses that the business incurs pass through the business to the owner's personal tax return, such profits are taxed under the owner's personal tax return. Simplicity. An LLC is the simplest business entity to form and operate. Unlike with a corporation, it's not necessary to have officers, directors, a board or shareholder meetings, or other administrative burdens that sometimes come with having a corporation. Flexibility.  LLCs provide enormous flexibility when it comes to ownership, management, and taxation, there's no minimum or maximum limits on the number of owners, also called members. Credibility. It reassures customers that yours is a real business. You'll also have an official name to use!     Cons of LLCs     Cost. It generally costs more to form and operate an LLC than to just be a sole proprietor or a partnership. Filing fees must be paid to legally establish the LLC.    Investment disadvantages.  LLCs are not ideal for business owners who seek outside investors. This is particularly true if you're looking for funding from venture capitalists who ordinarily will only fund corporations.
Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. This week, we’re diving into the namesake of the show--scaling your business. There are a number of steps you can take to effectively grow a healthy business, but first, you need to lay the foundation. Today, we’re talking about a few actionable steps you can take to see an immediate impact.   On a weekly basis, log on to your bank accounts. Not only to check your balances, to ensure things were paid on time, and clear any outstanding transactions, but also to solidify that no unnecessary, or even non-authorized money is moving out of your accounts.    Scan and file all your paperwork from the previous week. During this weekly review, look at your previous calendar data, making sure that if anybody you need to follow up with this week from the previous week are added to your schedule. You’re reviewing my upcoming appointments to make sure you have adequate time to plan, prepare, get water between meetings, and anything else you need time for. Once it’s on paper, you don’t need to stress so hard about it. Then, look at your ‘next actions’ list to mentally prepare what’s coming up and what’s on your plate.   Keep track of when you’re spending money. On every 10th and 25th of the month, pay those bills. Add up all the new deposits in your receivable accounts for each separate business you have. Then, multiply them by whatever percentage you’ve chosen. Make sure you start small--don't start with 15%. Finally, make your transfers. From your receivable account to your profit account, then again from receivable to your tax account, then from receivable to payable. And any other money that's leftover gets transferred from receivable to your vault account. Check out previous podcasts to hear how Jillian breaks down her accounts!   Every quarter, check your credit score. Just like checking your bank account balances every day, it's something that you can catch ahead of time. Fraud can lock up your credit score and hurt in the long run, so stay vigilant and get on top of problems early.   File your annual report for the business. This is something you may want to defer to your accountant to make sure that you may be paying quarterly versus annually. Make sure that you check with your team and your experts on that before making those payments. Key Takeaways   Weekly: Log on to your bank accounts. Not only to check your balances, to ensure things were paid on time, and clear any outstanding transactions, but also to solidify that no unnecessary, or even non-authorized money is moving out of your accounts.  Weekly: Scan and file all your paperwork from the previous week. Double-check that meetings from the previous week are added to your schedule. Make sure you have adequate time to plan, prepare, get water between meetings, and anything else you need time for. Then, look at your ‘next actions’ list to mentally prepare what’s coming up and what’s on your plate. Monthly: Keep track of when you’re spending money. On every 10th and 25th of the month, pay those bills. Add up all the new deposits in your receivable accounts for each separate business you have. Then, multiply them by whatever percentage you’ve chosen. Move your transfers appropriately! Quarterly: Check your credit score. Just like checking your bank account balances every day, it's something that you can catch ahead of time. Fraud can lock up your credit score and hurt in the long run, so stay vigilant and get on top of problems early. Yearly: File your annual report for the business. This is something you may want to defer to your accountant to make sure that you may be paying quarterly versus annually. Make sure that you check with your team and your experts on that before making those payments.
  Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom! This week, we’re talking about choosing a life insurance policy. This is an incredibly impactful and important choice that can often leave your head spinning. But, if we take it slow, break it down, and walk through the process, you’ll come out informed and confident in choosing a plan that works for your and your loved ones.    As you get started selecting a life insurance policy, consider where you are in the walk of life, what your needs are, and what your goals and desired outcomes are from making this choice. Get clear on your situation and allow it to guide your selection.    Understand that there are different types of plans and policies, the most common types of life insurance policies are term versus permanent. Term policies are like renting a house--you're also renting the insurance. So, just like when you're renting a house, when the term has expired, the policy's over with. Just like when you rent a home, when you move out of the home, you take your stuff, but you don't get any of the equity. Flip-flop that and you have permanent policies--ones that come with you regardless of term. It has cash value, the same way purchasing a home would when you go to sell it.    Consider how much coverage you really need. You don't want to ever be over-insured. Ask yourself, “If something were to have happened last night, what would I need? This will put the policy you need into perspective. You want to make sure that you have enough money to make any payments that you want to make, pay anything off you need to, but also give yourself adequate time to grieve that person's loss and to ensure that your lifestyle doesn't have to change because that person is no longer there.   Get familiar with the application process. It’s fairly easy--you fill out an application and have a medical exam performed. That information is sent to the agent and reviewed in the form of a medical credit report. From there, adjustments can be made. Don’t worry though, not all adjustments are bad! You may be in better health than you expected.    Finally, it’s up to you to choose where you purchase your policy. Your choices are a smaller local agent or a large national agency. Larger agencies have the benefit of being around for a long time and offer decent ratings on a large scale. Local agents are able to communicate and build a relationship with you throughout the process and tackle any challenges that come up in-stride and alongside you.    Key Takeaways:     Get clear on your situation and allow it to guide your selection. Know where you are in the walk of life, what your needs are, and what your goals and desired outcomes are from making this choice.  Consider how much coverage you really need. You don't want to ever be over-insured. Ask yourself, “If something were to have happened last night, what would I need? This will put the policy you need into perspective. Get familiar with the application process. It’s fairly easy--you fill out an application and have a medical exam performed. That information is sent to the agent and reviewed in the form of a medical credit report. From there, adjustments can be made.  Choose where you purchase your policy. Your choices are a smaller local agent or a large national agency. Larger agencies have the benefit of being around for a long time and offer decent ratings on a large scale. Local agents are able to communicate and build a relationship with you throughout the process and tackle any challenges that come up in-stride and alongside you.      LINKS   hijillian.com
This week’s topic on the Scale Your Small Business Podcast is a hot one. Every successful business utilizes technology, but how can you ensure your company is making the most of the software you have? This week, we’re breaking down what programs you should have to streamline, organize, and scale your small business.    First things first: if you’re going to look into purchasing or implementing new software or technology, make sure you check with your team--especially your back-end team and accountants--to ensure that they can coordinate with it. It’s not worth investing time, money, and energy if your team can’t actually use the software you’re looking into.    QuickBooks is an extraordinary online tool that can help you keep your bank statements, accounts, purchase orders, and more organized. This program can identify frequent areas of purchase, allows you to quickly swipe through purchases, placing them in the correct folders, and manage transactions.    While software is an additional initial expense for your business, when combined with a skilled bookkeeper, it becomes a worthwhile investment that will save you stress, money, and time.    No matter what software you choose to go with, set a deadline and sit down with your accountant to make a choice. Start getting into a habit of downloading bank statements early and often, and give your business the headstart it deserves.    Key Takeaways:    Make sure you check with your team--especially your back-end team and accountants--to ensure that they can coordinate with it. It’s not worth investing time, money, and energy if your team can’t actually use the software you’re looking into.  QuickBooks is an extraordinary online tool that can help you keep your bank statements, accounts, purchase orders, and more organized. This program can identify frequent areas of purchase, allows you to quickly swipe through purchases, placing them in the correct folders, and manage transactions. While software is an additional initial expense for your business, when combined with a skilled bookkeeper, it becomes a worthwhile investment that will save you stress, money, and time.  No matter what software you choose to go with, set a deadline and sit down with your accountant to make a choice. Start getting into a habit of downloading bank statements early and often, and give your business the headstart it deserves. 
Today’s topic is an important one and one that you simply can’t ignore as a small business owner. Separating your business and personal expenses is a crucial aspect of running a successful business and plays a huge role in the health of you, your employees, and your company. The longer you commingle things, the harder it's going to be to separate them. Let’s talk about it.    Before you get started, make sure you’re surrounded by professionals who can help you transition to a business tax ID, or if you’re using a personal social security number, your growth, how much your making, and other important aspects. The point is, you don’t know what you don’t know, and you don’t want to make an expensive mistake.    The first step you can take to separating your business and personal expenses is to have separate bank accounts and credit cards. This is super easy if you have a business that you have already established, that has a separate tax ID number that you can apply for credit cards and bank accounts separately Not only are you building up credit for your business, but it also makes it much easier for your bookkeeper or tax preparer as your business grows.    You also want to make sure that you have a separate budget for your business. You can just write it down in your notebook, keep a spreadsheet, whatever works for you. The point is, it’s easy to get sucked into purchasing all the bells and whistles for something for your company, and pretty soon you've created a pile of expenses and may not even realize it because it's all been coming out of your personal account.   Ensure that you keep a separate receipt collection organized. Either manually in a folder or digitally with something like QuickBooks, where you scan your receipts, keep them in order because it can get out of hand really quickly. Filing taxes has become so much easier that way.   When talking with your accountant, you might also want to mention when's a good time for me to start taking a salary. What type of salary? Should I be giving myself W2 income? Should I be giving myself 1099? What does this all look like? They're the best persons to give you those recommendations.   Finally, set a date that you’re going to do all of this. You’re going to have to, so rip that band-aid off and get it done.    Key Takeaways   Make sure you’re surrounded by professionals who can help you transition to a business tax ID, or if you’re using a personal social security number, your growth, how much your making, and other important aspects. You don’t know what you don’t know, and you don’t want to make an expensive mistake.    Have separate bank accounts and credit cards. This is super easy if you have a business that you have already established, that has a separate tax ID number that you can apply for credit cards and bank accounts separately Not only are you building up credit for your business, but it also makes it much easier for your bookkeeper or tax preparer as your business grows.    Have a separate budget for your business. You can just write it down in your notebook, keep a spreadsheet, whatever works for you. The point is, it’s easy to get sucked into purchasing all the bells and whistles for something for your company, and pretty soon you've created a pile of expenses and may not even realize it because it's all been coming out of your personal account.   Ensure that you keep a separate receipt collection organized. Either manually in a folder or digitally with something like QuickBooks, where you scan your receipts, keep them in order because it can get out of hand really quickly. Filing taxes has become so much easier that way.   Set a date that you’re going to do all of this. You’re going to have to, so rip that band-aid off and get it done. 
This week’s topic is a tough one, and it’s something that many business owners have done and every business owner hates to do. Firing an employee is a difficult, albeit necessary measure that can often leave your work better than it was. However, there is a right way to do it--with empathy and compassion. Today, we’re talking about some tactics you can use to make sure you’re equipped.    The most important thing that you have to remember is that this is not only a difficult conversation for you, but it's also a difficult conversation for them. When they wake up tomorrow, they don't have a job to go to. And that can be terrifying. This is a hard decision for you, but it's also going to be even more difficult for them. So be compassionate. One thing that you can do too when you are letting someone go that is physically with you, is you can wait till the end of the day and walk out with them.    Make sure you’re ready to have the conversation. If you need someone present (like HR), make sure they’re aware. Know when and where you’ll have the conversation. Have a list of things you need back from them, accounts that need to have rights revoked, keys, and badges. Having to make a call afterward is awkward and can be viewed as disrespectful.    This is not a begathon. The decision has been made. They no longer work here, which means you have to have this conversation in the past tense. There should be no inclination that they may be able to come back, negotiate with you, any of those sorts of things. This is a cut-and-dry situation. Most importantly, you don't want to drag your feet. You want to get it done. Don't talk about a whole bunch of stuff. Come to them and say, "Listen, I have some bad news for you today. Today's your last day." Be transparent about your reasoning and communicate, but be short and sweet. Remember to speak with your team as well. Losing someone who you spend every day around can be traumatic, to some degree. You don't need to tell them exactly what happened, but do tell them how roles will be divvied up and the direction you’re going forward. Make sure they’re aware that it’s a one-off event to avoid any worry of more firings. You can reassure them that their jobs are not in danger.   While firing can be difficult, more often than not you will feel better and your business will be better for it.    Key Takeaways This is not only a difficult conversation for you, but it's also a difficult conversation for them. When they wake up tomorrow, they don't have a job to go to. And that can be terrifying. This is a hard decision for you, but it's also going to be even more difficult for them. So be compassionate.  Make sure you’re ready to have the conversation. If you need someone present (like HR), make sure they’re aware. Know when and where you’ll have the conversation. Have a list of things you need back from them, accounts that need to have rights revoked, keys, and badges. Having to make a call afterward is awkward and can be viewed as disrespectful.  The decision has been made. They no longer work here, which means you have to have this conversation in the past tense. This is a cut-and-dry situation. Most importantly, you don't want to drag your feet. You want to get it done. Be transparent about your reasoning and communicate, but be short and sweet. Remember to speak with your team as well. Losing someone who you spend every day around can be traumatic, to some degree. You don't need to tell them exactly what happened, but do tell them how roles will be divvied up and the direction you’re going forward. Make sure they’re aware that it’s a one-off event to avoid any worry of more firings. You can reassure them that their jobs are not in danger.
Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom.This week, we’re going to talk about quarterly distributions. Everyone’s favorite question for their accountant is “how much money do I get to spend?” When the answer isn’t what you want to hear, it can be frustrating. But, there is a way to see the money you earned and spend it how you want. Let’s talk about it.   In Mike Michalowicz’s book Profit First, he talks about moving your money into different accounts every month to budget and keep track of your money, but he also talks about celebrating successfully managing and saving money, paid for with money they’ve been able to save by using this process. So, how do we get there?   The account we’re talking about today is the profits account. This is where you’re going to be looking every month. First, you’re going to pay off any debt or any outstanding balances you need to pay. Additionally, you’re going to pull from this account to save for a purchase for yourself, your business, pleasure, whatever you want. That’s the beauty of this technique.   As this distribution to your accounts is quarterly, you’re going to be moving this money four times a year. You do have to be, of course, disciplined in transferring the money over every paycheck. Start small, but make sure that you are upping those percentages as much as possible--monthly, quarterly, yearly, up to you!   The point is that your motivation for saving, budgeting, and managing your money is that you can spend YOUR profit how YOU want. By taking that money out of the profit account, you get to spend it wherever you want, whether that is a really expensive handbag or a fancy car, or just something small. It really could be anything that you want. It's your money to spend throughout the year.   Key Takeaways     Pull from your profits account. You’re going to be moving money from your paychecks to your Profit Account. From there, pay off any debt or any outstanding balances. Additionally, you’re going to pull from this account to save for a purchase for yourself, your business, pleasure, whatever you want. That’s the beauty of this technique. Be disciplined. Start small, but make sure that you are upping those percentages as much as possible--monthly, quarterly, yearly, up to you!   Spend YOUR profit how YOU want. By taking that money out of the profit account, you get to spend it on whenever you want, whether that is a really expensive handbag or a fancy car, or just something small. It really could be anything that you want. It's your money to spend throughout the year.
Welcome back to this week’s episode of the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom! Many small business owners are looking to uplevel their practices as they expand by joining Mastermind groups. While these communities are incredibly powerful tools to help you take the next step, it’s important to be intentional about where you spend your money, what groups you join, what they offer, and how you can maximize your experience. Let’s take a look at those questions!   To preface this episode, Jillian is involved with three different mastermind groups that all meet at different intervals, offer different things, and provide different perspectives, all valuable to the growth of business mindsets. Two of her groups meet monthly and one is a weekly group. All of these groups have different sizes, different compositions, and different focuses! While most have shifted to Zoom during COVID, but the value remains. In fact, in some ways, the groups have improved as the groups have been concentrated into those who are hyper-committed to the benefits a mastermind can provide, and it allows for the participants to engage on an even deeper level.    While it can seem intimidating at first, paying for access to a mastermind class is a worthwhile investment. You then have skin in the game--a reason to grow and make the most of your time in the group. In addition, there may be periods where you can join a meeting or two to see if it is a good fit for you and that you’ll get the value that you need. Consider who is in the group, what the topics of the group are, the size, meeting time, and overall vibe.    Mastermind groups are also an incredible opportunity to network and reference (and be referenced).    A major benefit of a mastermind group is the perspectives that are brought to the table. They can offer thoughts, give honest feedback, and spark new ideas.  Sometimes, you can be too close to your business to see some crucial changes that you could be making. Bringing in an outside view can give you a holistic approach to growth. The feedback you get from people who may be your friend, but not someone you’ve known forever is incredibly valuable. They can tell you when something is great, but they won’t hold back if something stinks. Getting constant “positive” feedback isn’t always helpful. You can get that on social media. They’ll offer solutions and pathways that can break down hurdles you may be facing.   Being in a mastermind group opens you up to accountability. Setting goals is a massive part of owning, building, and scaling a business of any size. But what happens once you set that goal? Having a group of like-minded individuals meeting with you weekly to check in on your progress is an effective way of staying on top of your checkpoints.  Key Takeaways     While it can seem intimidating at first, paying for access to a mastermind class is a worthwhile investment. You then have skin in the game--a reason to grow and make the most of your time in the group. In addition, there may be periods where you can join a meeting or two to see if it is a good fit for you and that you’ll get the value that you need.  Consider who is in the group, what the topics of the group are, the size, meeting time, and overall vibe. The feedback you get from people who may be your friend, but not someone you’ve known forever is incredibly valuable. They can tell you when something is great, but they won’t hold back if something stinks. Getting constant “positive” feedback isn’t always helpful.  A major benefit of a mastermind group is the perspectives that are brought to the table. They can offer thoughts, give honest feedback, and spark new ideas.  Sometimes, you can be too close to your business to see some crucial changes that you could be making. Bringing in an outside view can give you a holistic approach to growth.  Being in a mastermind group opens you up to accountability. Setting goals is a massive part of owning, building, and scaling a business of any size. But what happens once you set that goal? Having a group of like-minded individuals meeting with you weekly to check in on your progress is an effective way of staying on top of your checkpoints.     
Welcome back to the Scale Your Small Business Podcast with your host, Jillian Flodstrom. If you’ve been a solo entrepreneur for any amount of time, you probably know that you need help. Everybody tells you that you need help, but you have no idea who this first person that you should hire, what they should do, who they should be, maybe even what to look for. Today, we’re answering the question: who should be my first hire?   Hiring can be emotionally draining. It can also be expensive. You want to make sure that you find the right person upfront, that way you don't have to worry about any potential problems down the road. You have to ensure that your first hire is especially good so you can build confidence in hiring and allow yourself to go with your gut.    When you’re looking to hire or bring someone onto your team, it’s important to first get clear on what this person can help you with. Is there a task that you consistently procrastinate doing? Is there an aspect of your business that is outside of your zone of genius? These are all great qualifiers that can help you make the right choice. For Jill, this meant finding a top-notch video editor that can bring her personality through in her videos. This also meant finding someone to help manage, organize, and label the seemingly endless stream of emails.    You want to get as granular as possible when you’re making that first hire. Be very aware of what this job looks like now and what it’ll look like in the future. That way, you build a position with longevity and efficacy, and you’ll be able to write a proper job description should you need to rehire.    Hire people who really want it. Consider offering your candidates a project to complete with a deadline to make sure their skills, whatever they may be, are up to your standard. Sometimes people can be great interviewers, but not great workers. Give them a chance to prove themselves early so they can keep that energy as they join your team.   Your new hire doesn’t necessarily need to be in your timezone. Don’t hesitate to go outside of your area to find an assistant. There is a pool of incredible candidates that are ready to work for you virtually, and who have something to prove. You won’t regret it.    Key Takeaways Hiring can be emotionally draining. It can also be expensive. You want to make sure that you find the right person upfront because when your first hire is especially good, you can build confidence in hiring and allow yourself to go with your gut.  Get clear on what this person can help you with. Is there a task that you consistently procrastinate doing? Is there an aspect of your business that is outside of your zone of genius? These are all great qualifiers that can help you make the right choice. Be very aware of what this job looks like now and what it’ll look like in the future. That way, you build a position with longevity and efficacy, and you’ll be able to write a proper job description should you need to rehire.  Hire people who really want it. Consider offering your candidates a project to complete with a deadline to make sure their skills, whatever they may be, are up to your standard. Sometimes people can be great interviewers, but not great workers. Give them a chance to prove themselves early so they can keep that energy as they join your team. Your new hire doesn’t necessarily need to be in your timezone. Don’t hesitate to go outside of your area to find an assistant. There is a pool of incredible candidates that are ready to work for you virtually, and who have something to prove. You won’t regret it. 
Title: Empowering Your Evening Routine   Quotes from this episode   “The entire day can go by, you fall into bed exhausted and you're like, "What did I get done? What happened today?"   “I'm a growly bear if I don't get enough sleep.”   “Sometimes my brain is going a million miles an hour, so I always have a journal by my bed too so if there's something that I think of in the middle of the night, I will write that down.”   “Getting sleep is super important.”   Shownotes   Just as important as gearing up for your day in the morning is the way you decompress and wind down at the end of it. By adding structure to the end of your workday, you allow your mind and body to process, reorganize, rest, and reset. Today, we’re breaking down Jill’s evening routine.    Just like many folks, Jill’s workday ends at 5:00. After work, doing a short 30-minute yoga practice can help decompress the stress built up in your body, allowing you to wind down for the day. From there, having dinner, reading, watching TV, and being with family releases the built-up pressures of the workday.    Another useful thing you can do in your evening routine is organizing past, current, and future projects around the house. This is a great time to purge unwanted junk, itemize what you have around the house, and file what needs to be filed. That way, if you ever need to move, downsize, or locate an important item, you did that after work one day!   Now that you’ve successfully wrapped up your evening, prep for the morning. That means taking care of yourself overnight: brush your teeth, have water handy, lay out clothes if you need to, have your morning self-care ready to go. That way, when you wake up, you don’t have any extra work you need to do that could put you off track.    In bed, Jill recommends reading from a real book--avoiding blue light. While it can be nice to watch a YouTube video or read on your phone, the light can wake you up instantly and prevent you from falling asleep, staying asleep, and getting the rest you need and deserve. If your mind goes a million miles an hour, instead of going on your phone, keep a journal next to your bed where you can jot down ideas and thoughts and dreams.    It’s important to remember that there is a natural ebb and flow to life--you’re not going to be doing yoga at the same time every day, you may have to adjust, and that’s okay! The goal is to set yourself up for success by allowing your body to rest. A routine is the fastest way there!   Key Takeaways   After work, doing a short 30-minute yoga practice can help decompress the stress built up in your body, allowing you to wind down for the day. From there, having dinner, reading, watching TV, and being with family releases the built-up pressures of the workday. After work, organize past, current, and future projects around the house. This is a great time to purge unwanted junk, itemize what you have around the house, and file what needs to be filed. That way, if you ever need to move, downsize, or locate an important item, you did that after work one day! Consider reading from a real book--avoiding blue light. While it can be nice to watch a YouTube video or read on your phone, the light can wake you up instantly and prevent you from falling asleep, staying asleep, and getting the rest you need and deserve. If your mind goes a million miles an hour, instead of going on your phone, keep a journal next to your bed where you can jot down ideas and thoughts and dreams.  It’s important to remember that there is a natural ebb and flow to life--you’re not going to be doing yoga at the same time every day, you may have to adjust, and that’s okay! The goal is to set yourself up for success by allowing your body to rest. A routine is the fastest way there!
  On this week’s episode, we’re going to talk about morning routines. We’ll take a step by step walkthrough of Jillian’s process in the morning and how each aspect brings something new, productive, and effective to the table. With the right tools and the right mentality, you can set yourself up for a good day, every day.    Start your day early--Jill wakes up at 5:45 to get her routine started. If you’re not used to waking up that early, or you find yourself clinging to your bedspread in the cold morning, check out a Sunrise Alarm Clock from Amazon. It’ll get you up in a much more gentle, natural way.   Structure is key when it comes to setting up or revamping a morning routine. Having dedicated periods or blocks of time for certain preemptive preparation for your day will make sure you cover your bases and give yourself the best shot you can at an outstanding day.    5:45 - 6:00 is a great time to get the essentials out of the way. This time is for using the bathroom, brushing your teeth, get dressed, and situate yourself for the day.    At 6:00, it’s time to get breakfast, take your vitamins, and start your Miracle Morning. If you aren’t familiar, Miracle Morning is a series of 5-minute meditations, 5 minutes of visualizations and affirmations, 15 minutes of reading a self-improvement book, and a 10-minute journaling session. During this time, it’s also important to remember to drink as much water as possible!   6:45 - 8:15 is dedicated to getting a workout in, stretching, drinking more water, as well as replying to comments, checking YouTube videos, and checking social DMs. It’s good to bake in professional activities into your morning as you’re taking care of things to give yourself a head-start.   8:15 to 9:00 is a learning and implementation block. This time is for any courses you’re taking to improve your business, fleshing out any ideas you’ve had, and in general learning and educating yourself. Spend this time looking through coaching materials and getting your brain going before your start your workday.    There are things you can put in place at the end of your workday to keep your momentum into the next morning. Creating a routine in the evenings, after your work, will clear the space in your head to start again the next day.    Start by writing down your next day’s to-do list and review your affirmations. Use this time to solidify your goals and put your mindset where you want it to be before you step out the door. Plugin your devices and set up your workspace for success. Consider laying out vitamins, piling papers on your desk, and filling a Yeti cup with ice so when you sit down in the morning it’s ready for you!   If you are interested in finding more about Jill’s morning routine, let her know!   Key Takeaways   Structure is key when it comes to setting up or revamping a morning routine. Having dedicated periods or blocks of time for certain preemptive preparation for your day will make sure you cover your bases and give yourself the best shot you can at an outstanding day.  5:45 - 6:00: Get the essentials out of the way. This time is for using the bathroom, brushing your teeth, get dressed, and situate yourself for the day.   6:00: Get breakfast, take your vitamins, and start your Miracle Morning, a series of 5-minute meditations, 5 minutes of visualizations and affirmations, 15 minutes of reading a self-improvement book, and a 10-minute journaling session.  6:45 - 8:15 Get a workout in, stretch, drink more water, and take a moment replying to comments, checking YouTube videos, and checking social DMs. It’s good to bake in professional activities into your morning as you’re taking care of things to give yourself a head-start. 8:15 to 9:00: Learning and implementation block. This time is for any courses you’re taking to improve your business, fleshing out any ideas you’ve had, and in general learning and educating yourself. Spend this time looking through coaching materials and getting your brain going before your start your workday.
  Today, we’re taking a look at a super useful tool that helps you visualize your work, limit your work in progress, and maximize your efficiency. The Kanban Board is an organizational poster-style home for your tasks, projects, and important reminders. A simple, three-sectioned board divided into quarterly goals. If you’re looking for a way to keep your eyes on the prize, this is the way to go.    The Kanban Board’s three columns use Post-it notes--to-do, doing, and done. On each post-it note, you’re going to put whatever it is that you think you need to focus on. It can be as large or as small as you need it to be, the task can take two-minutes or it could take 2 years. The point is that you have a visual place to keep track of everything that’s on your plate. No matter how much comes at you, a Kanban board is there to make sure nothing takes more time than it needs, and nothing slips through the cracks.    In the to-do section, it’s helpful to break down what it is you need to get done by the day of the week. So, within your to-do column, you’re looking at what your priorities are for the day without getting bogged down by other tasks. Instead of saying “Okay, I have this to do” you can say “I’m doing this on this day of the week.” It holds you accountable and ensures you stay on top of things, especially the small ones.    The ‘doing’ section is where your to-do tasks go as you start the project. Any type of task you have to do can be moved from the day it’s supposed to happen to the day it’s happening. This way you can glance at your board and remind yourself of what you may still need to get done or notice that you can move it back to the to-do or forward it into the ‘done’ section.    The third section is the ‘done’ column, where you move everything you’ve accomplished throughout the day. Sometimes it can feel like we have wasted our day away doing nothing or spending too much time on menial tasks. This section is great for giving you concrete evidence that you have been productive. It’s super gratifying.    Another cool aspect of a Kanban board is how it offers a physical representation of taking on too much. You can break this down into 90 days to see what is manageable for you.    Jill’s technique of breaking down tasks that take minutes or less works well with a Kanban Board. When you write down your tasks on sticky notes, you realize just how much you can get done in a focused, intentional period of time. Plus, it feels really good to move a lot of stuff to the “done” section! With larger goals, it can be equally gratifying to finally move that sticky note to the other side of the board. And from there, you can keep a collection of them and go over your accomplishments at the end of the year!   Game Changer: you can have an online Kanban Board through platforms like Asana and Trello. These project-management sites work the same way your personal board does, but here you can share it with your team members who are tasked with certain aspects of a project.    Other quick tips:  -Only use 3M sticky notes. You want to make sure these last and can handle being moved! -Consider color-coding types and varieties of tasks. There are tons of colors out there! -Use an apothecary jar to collect your biggest accomplishments.   Check out Jill’s Instagram to learn more about Kanban Boards! Key Takeaways   A Kanban Board is an organizational poster-style home for your tasks, projects, and important reminders. A simple, three-sectioned board divided into to-do, doing, and done. It uses Post-it notes to keep track of what you need to get done, what you’re doing, and what you’ve accomplished. Break your sections down to a weekly schedule to keep on top of what needs to be done at what time.  Kanban Boards can live online in the form of Asana or Trello. These platforms allow you to have a shareable, team-based project and task manager that works the same way as your personal board.    LINKS Hijillian.com @jillianflodstrom
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