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Scene Of the Crime

Scene Of the Crime

Author: Carolyn Ossorio & Kim Shepard

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Scene of the Crime is a podcast hosted by Carolyn Ossorio and Kim Shepard. A nitty-gritty exposé of true crimes in the Pacific Northwest that features a combination of storytelling, reporting, and interviewing experts who were at the Scene of the Crime.
73 Episodes
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The Stranger

The Stranger

2021-04-1501:07:26

The Drift Inn Tavern could be seen as drab by some with its dated décor, but to locals in the seaside town of Bremerton, the dive bar was like the tide with folks drifting in and drifting out. It’d been that way since the 1950's, and over the years it grew to be more than just a bar. It was a communal watering hole, a place of sustenance for the soul, and a place to be accepted, where the bartender didn’t judge and wasn’t stingy with a pour. And in the early 90's, it was exactly what 57 year old Marilyn Hickey was looking for: a place where everyone knew her name. And so it was that September night in 1992 this divey version of Cheers welcomed Marilyn, or the “Elvis Lady” as she was called. At just five feet tall, Marilyn was shooting the shit as she played pool, her outgoing personality and trusting nature drawing people to her. If only she’d been a little bit more suspicious that night as she started talking to a young man. A stranger with collar length reddish-brown hair. Folks later would recall seeing her companion, but nobody knew his name. After last call, Marilyn and the young man stumbled out of the Drift Inn together and got in a cab. They drove for just over a mile before they were dropped off at Marilyn’s apartment. It would be the last time Marilyn was seen alive. Her body would be found with scissors plunged through her heart. The only clue was the sketch of that stranger, who seemed to have disappeared without a trace. That is, until new technology revved up a case that had gone ice cold. A DNA profile found at the Scene of the Crime matched DNA from the scene of another brutal murder. Two years after Marilyn’s death, Cheryle Barratt, was found stabbed, sexually assaulted and slashed to death. After almost 30 years would two cold case detectives finally get some justice for not only Marilyn, but Cheryl too? Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Family Secrets

Family Secrets

2021-04-0851:26

Children should be seen and not heard. That's what she was told. And Alene was a good little girl. So, she went back to playing in the corner, while the grown ups leaned in closer, speaking in hushed tones, murmuring about the family secret: a woman named Beatrice Roscorla Andrewartha. Beatrice grew up in Cornwall, in the South West of England, around the turn of the 20th century. She was a beautiful, elegant woman - tall and slender with a halo of dark curls, bright eyes, and a gentle smile. The widow of a gold miner, Beatrice had been left with a small fortune and a desire to see the world. So, when her brother also lost his spouse and asked if she would move to Michigan to help him care for his three young daughters, Beatrice found herself on a ship bound for America. She spent many happy years with her brother's family, before the girls grew up and moved away to start families of their own. And, Beatrice once again found herself alone and wanting to see the world. This time, she planned to head to the West Coast and then North, to visit family in Canada. It was a bold move in 1919, for a woman to travel across the country without a chaperone. Maybe that's why the honeyed words of a well-dressed stranger sounded so tempting. He wanted to whisk her away to India, Asia and Australia; all the exotic places she'd been dreaming of, but didn't think she'd ever really see. It was a whirlwind romance between Beatrice and the gentleman on the train. Just a few weeks later they were married and making plans to honeymoon in Hawaii. To a curious little girl in the 1950's, eavesdropping on her mother's conversation, it all sounded like a fairytale. So, Alene didn't understand why it was such a closely guarded secret, why she'd never heard of Beatrice before, and why no one wanted to explain what happened to her after that whirlwind romance. It was a curiosity that stuck with Alene her entire life, until she unearthed a letter written to her grandfather in 1922 by an inmate at San Quinten. It was just the first breadcrumb along a trail that would lead Alene to one of the most prolific serial killers in our nation's history, a psychopath willing to do just about anything to get what he wanted... and NEARLY got away with it. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Justice for Jason

Justice for Jason

2021-03-3001:22:22

In the fall of 2020, Jason Fox was a 19 year old kid who had grown up in Newport, Washington.  The small city is a gorgeous slice of PNW pie complete with mountains, rivers, and forests. Everything the Evergreen State is famous for. But Jason, a creative, loving and kindhearted kid, was harboring a secret. He worried if he revealed it he wouldn’t be accepted, and like most teens, acceptance was the thing he craved more than anything else. And he was right to be concerned. Newport, a conservative place near the Idaho border, is more red than blue when it comes to its politics. Jason came out when he was 18 years old, sort of. In a move to be more accepted, Jason told Newport friends he was bisexual. He thought that would be easier than telling the truth: that he was gay. When Jason was 19 he started experimenting with drugs. His parents were worried, not only about the drugs but about a new, older crowd he was hanging out with. People he had a troubling history of clashing with. Even so, a couple friends from that group invited him to party at the Timber River Ranch, about five miles outside of town. By day the ranch was over 50 acres of rustic beauty and tranquility. But the night that Jason rolled down the long, dirt driveway he was never so alone and isolated. Jason’s parents believe that’s exactly why he was lured to this location. Jason sent a text just after midnight on September 15th, 2020. It was the last text he would ever send.  Three weeks later his body was found in a shallow grave. Four men have been charged with murder in connection with his murder. But, the motive is unclear. Jason's mom believes it was a hate crime. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Family Ties

Family Ties

2021-03-2051:151

Ashley Pond may have been a pre-teen, but instead of spunk and rebellion, she emanated sweetness and light. Despite the abuse she’d suffered at the hands of her father, the 12 year old from Oregon City was known to be a happy child who loved to dance. In fact, she was on a dance team with some of her closest friends and neighbors, Miranda and Mallori. The trio lived so close, they all met-up at the same bus stop each morning, before heading to Gardner Middle School, where they were in 7 th grade. On the morning of January 9 th , 2002, Ashley was running a little late. She rushed out the door at 8:15, hoping she hadn’t missed the bus. Some neighbors remember seeing Ashley as she hustled out of the apartment complex that morning… the last time anyone would see her alive. And, Ashley wouldn’t be the last of her friends to be stolen…. We're exploring the question of Nature versus Nurture with a family that includes three generations of killers. But, is this evil being passed along in their genes? Or was it the way they were raised? Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
The Swingers Playbook

The Swingers Playbook

2021-03-1301:02:13

Alger, Washington is a place too small to be considered a city. It’s more of a hamlet surrounded by the larger cities of Bellingham, Burlington and Sedro-Woolley. Located less than an hour from the Canadian border, Alger’s watering hole serves as a gathering place for locals who relish in the peace and quiet of woodland surrounded by a smattering of little lakes and forests to explore. The kind of tight knit place where folks are self-sufficient, but are also known to give the shirt off their backs to help a neighbor. That sounded just about right for the McBrides, Vanessa, Ken and their 11-year-old son. Vanessa and Ken had known each other since they were barely old enough to be considered teens. They became high school sweethearts, and by 2008 they’d been married for 14 years. A lot of trust and love went into that marriage. And, for the last 2-3 years they decided, together, to open their marriage to the Swinger lifestyle. They both could “play” sexually with other couples or individually. But there were rules. Vanessa and Ken had to approve of each other's partners. That March, Vanessa shared with Ken that she wanted to “play” with Jeremy, a popular track coach and substitute teacher at Ferndale High School. Ken gave the thumbs up, no doubt thinking that Jeremy was just another partner for Vanessa to play with and that no one could ever come between them. But Ken was wrong. Suddenly, what had once been fun and exciting had stopped being fun, at least for Ken.   And there were other stressors in the marriage, financial pressures. Ken would lose his job. And he would start to snoop on Vanessa’s computer, discovering chats between Jeremy and Vanessa where they expressed their love for each other. They were planning to “play” on Friday night, April 25 th, and hadn’t asked for Ken's permission. That went against their rules. On April 24 th Jeremy didn’t show up for work, It didn’t take long for the whole community to begin scouring all those woods looking for him. One day, became two, and on the third day hikers would find Jeremy’s body on a mountainside. The news spread like wildfire in this small bedroom community. Who had murdered Jeremy Scully and why? All those salacious details would begin to spill out. Even quaint little hamlets aren’t immune to tongue wagging over the titillating and shocking details of what goes on behind closed doors. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Poison Pill

Poison Pill

2021-03-0645:48

It was a Wednesday, June 11th, 1986. Fifteen year old Hayley Snow was up bright and early to get a jump on the day. It was nearing the end of the school year, and summer was so close she could taste it. It wouldn’t be long before she was sleeping in and staying up late with friends. Hayley popped by her parent’s room on the way to the shower, to say good morning to her mom. At 40-years old, Susan Snow had worked her way up the ranks and was an assistant vice president at the Puget Sound National Bank, managing their branch in Auburn. And, she was a married mother of two, with one girl off in college and the other soon to be on her way. That morning, Susan had a bit of a headache. But, it was nothing this busy working mother wasn’t used to. She popped some Extra-Strength Excedrin. As was their routine, Hayley got ready for school while Susan got ready for work, before meeting back up for breakfast. A half-hour later, when Hayley was just about ready to head down, she noticed the water was still running in her mom’s bathroom. Odd, she thought. Mom didn’t usually take that long. So, she popped her head in one more time to see what Susan was up to. Hayley was horrified to find her mom lying on the floor, barely breathing. Susan's pulse was so faint that even the paramedics had a hard time finding it. They called for a helicopter to rush her to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. But, Susan died just hours later. At first, it was a mystery how this seemingly healthy woman suddenly collapsed and died for no apparent reason. But it became clear during the autopsy when the coroner noticed the smell of bitter almonds, a distinct odor known to be caused by cyanide poisoning. Days later, toxicology tests would trace the poison to the bottle of Excedrin found in Susan’s bathroom. It was shocking, but not unheard of. Just a few years earlier seven people had died after taking cyanide-tainted Tylenol that had been planted at stores in the Chicago area. Could they have a copycat on their hands? It would take years for investigators to finally answer that question, and the answer would come from the most unlikely of places, when another Auburn woman called police claiming her husband had taken the same poisoned pills. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Cold Blooded

Cold Blooded

2021-02-2801:22:00

In 1989, Debbie Sweiger was coming into her own. At 35, she was in great shape. She had to be. As a highly skilled emergency room nurse, she never buckled under pressure. And, she liked the finer things in life. Her curls were coifed to match the latest style: big and blonde. She loved to wear her manicured nails blood red. Her dimpled smile was legendary, catching the attention of Bill Pawlyk. At 48, Bill was a respected businessman and executive. Even though they were both already married, the heart wants what the heart wants, and it wasn’t long before Debbie and Bill were in the midst of a steamy affair. Not long after, they would leave their spouses for each other. Still, Debbie was in the prime of her life. For a time, Bill had been a part of her newly single world, which included mingling, having fun and travel. But there was another side to Debbie. She had a lot of grit. She played hard, but worked even harder. Building new businesses took center stage over her relationship with Bill, who had become jealous and controlling. Debbie wanted a partner who was fun and adventurous, whose Joie de vivre matched her zest for life and love, someone like Larry Sturholm. Larry was a local RV personality who had recently joined Debbie on one of her business adventures.  Even though Larry had been happily married for over 2 decades, Bill was convinced they were having an affair. Debbie tried to soothe Bill’s fears, but also confided to close friends that she planned to “wean” Bill from their relationship. She said he was getting scary. But, she would deal with it when she got back from a trip to Florida to visit a friend. At least that’s where she told Bill she was going. The truth was, she was going to the Grand Caymen Islands with Larry. When Bill had found out, he stewed in a vile combination of rage, jealousy and bitterness. The night of the trip, Larry and Debbie would meet at her house with no idea that Bill was there lying in wait, hunting knives strapped to his ankles. And, he would have his revenge. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
How do you define success? And what are you willing to do to achieve it? Kim and Carolyn mull that over with a little help from James Baysinger, host of the Hide and Seek podcast. Plus, tips on getting your kids to eat their vegetables! It's a detour from their usual cases that will leave you shouting, "Kale Yeah!" Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
The Search for Kyron Horman

The Search for Kyron Horman

2021-02-2001:04:15

The red-eyed tree frog is known for being a little shy. Their tiny green bodies are easily camouflaged by their surroundings, melting into the background of the bright emerald leaves that dominate the forests of central America. It’s only when they feel comfortable that they’ll untuck their back legs and reveal the flash of cobalt blue that marks their sides. And, when they feel threatened, their bulging red eyes might give predators pause, giving the frog a chance to flee. If only 7 year old Kyron Horman was a little more like the tiny amphibians that fascinated him so much. The sandy-haired second grader was also known for being a little on the shy side, but around his friends and family he was quick to flash his wide smile, showing off the large front teeth that were still working their way into place. On the morning of June 4, 2010, Kryon was getting ready for the Science Fair at Portland’s Skyline Elementary School. He wore his black CSI T-shirt, the images of crime scene analysis both fitting for the event of the day and an ominous suggestion of what was to come. Kyron’s baby sister, Kiara, was buckled into her car seat as he hopped into his dad’s white pickup, his step-mother Terri behind the wheel. Terri had been a part of Kyron’s life for most of his seven short years, and she had always taken pride in doing everything a good mother should. On this day, that included chaperoning young Kyron at the Science Fair as he presented his research on the red-eyed tree frog. The president of the PTA would later recall seeing Terri and Kyron in his classroom at 8:45. Terri was taking a picture of the smiling Kyron, as he posed in front of the vividly colored tri-fold and shoe-box diorama that made up his exhibit. Kyron’s step mother had become pretty recognizable to many of the teachers and families at Skyline. Her bright red hair would often be seen on campus as she volunteered in the classroom. But, no one seems to remember seeing that shock of red hair at the top of the stairs as Terri waved a final goodbye to Kyron, before leaving to run some errands. At 10 o’clock the Science Fair was over, and it was time to go back to the usual business of the day. For Kyron that meant math class. But, when his teacher took attendance, Kyron’s chair was empty. His teacher didn’t think anything of it. Hadn’t Terri mentioned that Kyron had a doctor’s appointment that day? She noted the absence, but was sure it wasn’t a big deal. Not worth calling his parents and interrupting what was likely a busy day at work for them both. Kyron’s father, Kaine, was an engineer at Intel. His mother, Desiree, was in Medford, over 200 miles away. It wasn’t until six hours later, when Kyron failed to get off the bus that afternoon, that it became clear something was very, very wrong. Hundreds of searchers would comb the area around the school all night long and for days afterward. They didn’t see any sign of Kyron. But, investigators did start to notice something was off about Terri. The timeline she gave them for that day kept shifting, and there were several hours that she couldn’t account for at all. The days stretched into weeks. The search intensified. Still no sign of Kyron.  But, suspicion was growing that maybe Terri wasn’t such a perfect mother after all. And then, a month after Kyron’s disappearance, a shocking request from Kaine. He said Desiree needed to meet with him in secret because Terry was trying to have him killed. With a mounting desperation to find Kyron and fears that her older son could be next, Desiree took her plea to the public, begging for information that could lead them to her little boy. Thousands of tips have come in and dozens of searches have been conducted, but after more than 10 years that burning question remains unanswered: What happened to Kyron Horman? Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Where's My Mommy?

Where's My Mommy?

2021-02-1101:12:39

There is no more profound emotion that’s deeper than a child’s love of their mother. Nine year old Samantha Moyer felt that love. Those memories are forever etched in her mind's eye. Her mother’s penchant for playing with her daughters and being silly, dancing and singing together like nobody’s watching, then falling to the floor to enjoy a shared giggle at their goofiness. At the tail end of winter 2009, Samantha was a shy little girl who still slept with her mother, Nancy. On a cold March night Samantha snuggled up close, not knowing that would be the last night she would feel her mother’s warm embrace. Inexplicably, the next day 36 year old Nancy Moyer was alone in her little house in Tenino, Washington, when she disappeared without a trace. And little Samantha was left with a hole in her heart, her mommy, suddenly and without warning, stolen. The ache Samantha feels has been her North star in her quest to find out who murdered her mother. In 2019 they thought they might finally get the answer. There was a huge break in the case. Eric Roberts, a former co-worker and neighbor, dialed 9-1-1 and confessed to killing Nancy. After 10 years of not knowing, would the family finally find out what happened? But, just days later, that suspect would recant his confession. And he would leave that now-grown little girl with the lingering question, “Where’s my mommy?” Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
That night felt just like any other. Shelly Monahan was wrapping up her shift, delivering news to folks in Spokane on KJRB 790. It was known as the “Hot Talk” station in town. Sunshine Shelly, as she was known on the air, was just 20 years old and working the late shift to “pay her dues,” as they say in the business. The radio station was located in a single-story building at the south end of Spokane’s South Hill Neighborhood. It was a small, unassuming place, aside from the station’s call letters that were proudly displayed above the entrance. When Shelly walked out late that night, in the fall of 1979, she headed toward her car, which was parked in the lot right outside the front door. She was just steps away from slipping into the driver’s seat, when suddenly she was grabbed from behind. Before she could even take stock of what was happening the assailant started hitting her, beating her viciously in the face with his fists. At one point, he even stuck his fist in her mouth and Shelly reacted on instinct, chomping down on his hand and drawing blood. The man cried out and threated to kill her while continuing his brutal attack. Shelly was beaten nearly unconscious and she was raped. When it was finally over, the man tried to have a conversation with the woman he’d just violated so viscously, asking how her career was going and what she planned to do next. But, Shelly was dazed... shocked... unable to speak. She remained silent as the man slunk off into the night. Sunshine Shelly was just one of dozens of women who were sexually assaulted in Spokane’s South Hill neighborhood in the late 70’s and early 80’s. It wasn’t until a new investigator came on the scene with a fresh set of eyes that they noticed the similarities in the attacks. But, getting the perpetrator convicted would be just the first battle in a war that would be fought in the courts for decades. And, even today, there are some who say the South Hill Rapist could be released, free to once again torment the town that he had terrorized all those years ago. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Empathy. It’s a word defined as the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. But to truly recognize and understand someone’s pain and suffering on a deep level, it requires walking a mile in their shoes. Autumn Stone was wearing tennis shoes as she walked along the well tread path at Green Lake on that gorgeous Labor Day weekend in 2019. Green Lake is a hot spot in Seattle for paddleboarding, kayaking and swimming. And the three mile path that circles the lake is ideal for joggers, walkers, and folks on wheels. On that Friday at noon, Autumn walked the path alone with a heavy heart. The 23 year old had worried away 12 pounds in the last 9 days. Even though the park was packed, no one noticed Autumn until it was too late. Nobody heard the silent keen from the depths of her soul. No one knew that this young mother should have had her 5 week old, Devante, snuggled up to her breast. But she hadn’t held her newborn in 9 days. Not since the night she had left her sleeping baby with his father to make a quick fast food run. When she returned, her precious baby was clinging to life. Unbeknownst to Autumn, her fiancé, Tyler, had gone to prison previously for shaking a different baby. Their relationship was over. Even though she was crushed, Autumn’s family said she was on track to do whatever it took to get her baby back. She leaned into her faith for strength, writing a prayer in her journal just before driving to Green Lake, where she received a flurry of calls from her step mother, the first family member to be cleared to hold her baby. It would have been a welcome relief for Autumn, if she ever got that final phone call. But, by that time, Seattle Police were pulling her lifeless body from the lake. Investigators were quick to call it a suicide, but Autumn’s friends and family have their doubts... Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
How much is too much when it comes to graphic images from the Scene of the Crime? It's something we often grapple with and would love to hear what you think! Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Scene of the Crime hosts Kim Shepard and Carolyn Ossorio update several of their previous cases, including new details on efforts to solve the murders of U.S. Attorney Tom Wales and beloved mother Karen Bodine. They also share previously unreleased video taken by family annihilator Peter Keller. Get to know the wife, daughter and beloved pet whose lives were stolen by Keller and hear about their eerie connection with Kim's own children. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Former Detective and current Host of the podcast Somebody, Somewhere, Paul Holes joins Kim and Carolyn for this Deepish Thoughts. Not only does he share insights into what it's like going from one side of the crime scene tape to the other, but he offers to help with the unsolved case covered in Scene of the Crime: Fallen Angels. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
The legends of the American West are filled with heroes and villains. But, what side of the ledger a gunslinger fell on often depended on who was telling the tale. Was Wyatt Earp a killer and degenerate gambler or a lawman trying to clean up the Frontier? Was Butch Cassidy a gentleman thief who took just what he needed, or was he a hot-headed gun slinger who rustled trains and cattle and didn’t care who stood in his way? You might wonder the same about Harry Tracy. He was a sometimes cowboy, sometimes cattle rustler who was known for being an honest outlaw. He always kept his word. Most of the time, anyway. Maybe that’s why a couple of wheat farmers in the open plains of eastern Washington agreed to let him stay awhile. This young stranger, who wandered in off the fields, offering to do a little work in exchange for a bed and a hot meal. Or maybe, these weren’t a couple of country bumpkins. Maybe they knew about the $8,000 bounty they could get if they brought him in, dead or alive. And, maybe these frontier farmers were just as cunning as he was, lulling the outlaw into a false sense of security while they secretly sent for the local posse. He was dubbed The Last American Desperado. But how did this kid from Wisconsin wind up the most wanted man in the west? What was he running from? And what would it take to finally take him down? Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
The Dog Whisperer

The Dog Whisperer

2021-01-0801:04:05

Man’s best friend. It's a phrase coined to describe the loyalty, love, and companionship of a dog. Nurturing this unconditional love is a staple in Seattle, with so many different breeds and temperaments to strike your fancy. And, for the lucky, you could hire Mark Stover, Seattle’s own “Dog Whisperer” to train your beloved pet. If only communicating with humans came as easily to Mark, maybe he wouldn’t have had to go through such a messy, ugly divorce that rocked him to his knees. His former wife, Linda Opdycke, was beautiful, tall and lean with glossy blond hair, and she was an heiress. They built Island K-9 Training together on her family’s private island in Puget Sound. Before it was said and done, Linda accused Mark of not being able to let go, of being a gun toting, emotionally unstable stalker. The lowest point came when Mark was caught rifling through her garbage. He was arrested for stalking and slapped with a domestic violence protection order. Through it all, trusty Dingo was by Mark’s side. They went everywhere together. Not only was Ding his best friend, she was his protection. And, by October, 2009 Mark had moved on. He had no contact with Linda. He even had a new love in his life and was settling nicely into a new location for his dog business. But, despite all the progress, those closest to Mark knew he had worries. Like a dog with a keen sense of smell and intuition, Mark was fearful and anxious. Some say he was afraid of his own shadow. He even hired a private investigator and shared with her the source of his terror: that his ex-wife and her powerful father were out to destroy him. Michiel Oakes was Linda’s boyfriend on that crisp October morning in 2009, when Mark’s worst fears would come to pass. Mark, never did come back that day. But they found his beloved Dingo, bloody and growling. He was gravely injured with three bullets in his brain. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
Requiem for Mia Zapata

Requiem for Mia Zapata

2020-12-3153:33

It was once described as one of Seattle’s oldest, diviest bars, famous for its loud stage pungent bathroom and ceiling of nicotine-stained dollar bills. For over 50-years, The Comet Tavern was a second home for Seattle musicians, the red neon sign over the front door welcoming them in out of the rain. In the ground floor of a century-old three-story brick building, the façade was painted a deep black. The bar always had some no-name local craft beers on tap, the perfect drink for those starving artists. Nestled in between Capitol Hill and the Central District, the neighborhood might’ve been a little seedy, but in the 90’s it was Ground Zero for Seattle’s grunge scene. The Comet was just a block away from where you’ll now find a tribute to Jimmy Hendrix. A life-size bronze sculpture of the guitar legend living out his finest moment, guitar in hand, head flung back, on his knees in ecstasy. The look on his face reminiscent of another Seattle rocker who was also gone too soon. Mia Zapata had grown up in the Midwest. She was a musician to the core. A little shy, a little goofy, but when she hit the stage as the lead singer for the Gits, she would come alive. Mia’s passion was palpable as she belted out lyrics with her soulful growl. The band developed a reputation for intense, fiery performances that would pack the clubs in Seattle, and up and down the West Coast. They had just wrapped up one of those West Coast tours, when they hit the Comet on a Tuesday evening in July, 1993. They were celebrating. Not only did their latest performances get rave reviews, but they’d just been made an offer by Atlantic Records. Their future never looked brighter. Mia stumbled out of the Comet that night, after more than a few of those craft brews, with a smile on her face, listening to the music coming from her Walkman cassette player. With no cab in sight, she set off walking instead. It was a little over a mile to her house, but it was a warm July evening and she had plenty of excitement to work off, anyway. I can just picture Mia, in her ratty jeans, hands in her pockets, her favorite Gits hoodie keeping off the cool breeze coming in off the water. Her choppy brown hair hanging loosely, brushing the tops of her shoulders. I bet she was singing as she walked along that night... imagining the next time she would be on stage… But, there wouldn’t be a next time. Just one hour later, Mia’s body would be found dumped in the street. She’d been sexually assaulted, beaten, and strangled. The cord of her Gits hoodie used to steal her life. She was just 27 years old, the same age Jimi Hendrix was when he died. And Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison. It was exactly the kind of company Mia deserved to be in, but for exactly the wrong reason. The monstrous attack and the decade-long search for the killer would change the Seattle music scene forever. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
The Unthinkable

The Unthinkable

2020-12-2457:28

It was the 80's, 1983 to be exact a time, a time infamous for both excess and innocence in America. A time when kids were riding their bikes in packs until the streetlamps came on. Moms were in the workforce like never before. A time when a lunch for most kids was Wonderbread, Skippy Peanut Butter and grape jelly. Michael Jackson, Madonna and Cindy Lauper ruled the airwaves. It was an age where anything seemed possible. But, there was a dark side to the progress and prosperity: a sort of throw away culture where things were easily replaced. Some say, for Diane Downs that included her own children. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
True Crime can teach us so much about human nature, including how some people use gifting as a weapon. (Just listen to our recent episode, The Gold Digger.) In this Deepish Thoughts, Carolyn Ossorio and Kim Shepard talk about what gifting means to them and how they protect themselves from the dangerous strings that can sometimes be attached. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/scene-of-the-crime699/exclusive-content Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
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Comments (9)

Nikki McDaniel

I do believe and agree with you both that this is a very touchy subject but it really does need to be talked about this way we as parents and humans are aware of these things but and to also communicate with our children about people like this and to speak up.

Feb 5th
Reply (1)

Nikki McDaniel

I’ve actually heard a podcast similar to both your intake of this Hillside Stranglers and I didn’t know the killer was actually found in Washington, Bellingham of all places.

Jan 29th
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Nikki McDaniel

Who does like this?? Crazy. I always wonder what possesses people to do things like this to others. Especially family members. Yikes

Jan 29th
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Nikki McDaniel

How creepy!!! A cabin full of fairy stuff and inappropriate photos of children! Chilling.

Jan 29th
Reply

Nikki McDaniel

I do wish I could enlarge the pictures

Jan 28th
Reply (1)

Nikki McDaniel

Great episode ladies!!!

Jan 28th
Reply (1)
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