DiscoverSeize Your Adventure: An Epilepsy Podcast
Seize Your Adventure: An Epilepsy Podcast

Seize Your Adventure: An Epilepsy Podcast

Author: Francesca Turauskis

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Seize Your Adventure is a multi-tool: a great adventure podcast that is also an epilepsy podcast.

From long-distance hikes in Europe to skiing in snowstorms, the storytelling episodes share life-changing journeys and the smaller moments spent between seizures.

The ‘chats’ with guests dive into the deeper stuff, the hidden aspects of taking on adventures with epilepsy - from carrying medication in a backpack, to assessing seizure risks in the wilderness and recognising limitations.

And we investigate the perceptions of epilepsy in society and the adventure community.
32 Episodes
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Is it safe to surf with epilepsy? How can you support somebody who has seizures  in the water?  And do surfing instructors know how to help someone with epilepsy? In this episode, Frankie York takes us through some of her own experiences surfing with epilepsy, and how having epilepsy affects her relationships with other surfers. Surfing is classified as a top tier extreme sport, with inherent danger and a need to be aware and alert at all times. But it is also a sport recognised for the therapeutic benefits, and the sense of escapism being in the water can provide. Frankie found a passion for surfing when she was travelling in Ecuador. Over the last 2 years, she has had to explore her relationship with the sport, and examine how to stay safe. And she has also had to explore and examine the relationships she has with her fellow surfers, who have supported her through her epilepsy journey. In this episode, Frankie talks to three surfers: Simon, who runs her local surf school; Jessie, who was the former Vice President at their University surf society; and Zim, a good friend who supported Frankie with surfing, and with her seizures. They talked about: The requirements for becoming a International Surfing Association (ISA) qualified instructor How much responsibility should friends of surfers with epilepsy take? Responsibility in a more formal organisational manner What goes into planning a surf trip The accessibility of surfing when you have additional needs or safety concerns The type of emergency training surf instructors undertake Risk assessments from a professional point of view What organisers do to help 'high risk' people and what worst case scenario plans are How it feels to support a friend with epilepsy What Frankie's surfer friends would like people with epilepsy to know Plus we hear a bit more about Frankie's backstory and when she started having seizures, and balancing her passion for surfing. CONTENT WARNING: We talk about some close calls with surfing, and the potential consequences of having a seizure in water. CONTENT WARING 2: There is a small swearword. Disclaimer: Please remember this is Frankie' personal experience. We take no responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions. SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Sign up for as little as $3 a month (that’s  less than the price of a coffee!!). All Patrons will get extra content every month, even between seasons, and Patrons at $5 and above get bonus episodes. Find out more at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License TRANSCRIPT ON ITS WAY. I am working to try and get accurate transcripts for all the Seize Your Adventure episodes. In the meantime, you can find most episodes on YouTube for auto transcription.
Back in July, Seize Your Adventure grew a little bit bigger. Francesca York (who luckily goes by Frankie to stop any confusion!) has volunteered her help over the next few months as an SYA Intern and it will be great to get her fresh eyes/ears on things. This episode shares the Instagram LIVE conversation me and Frankie had back in August, where we got to learn a little bit more about her, and how she seizes her adventure. We talked about: Learning to surf (because of a boy...) The dangers of surfing with epilepsy, and some close calls How your choices regarding risk can affect others The best way to learn to surf as a beginner How surfing can be addictive and becomes a lifestyle Learning to listen to your body when you have epilepsy Speaking to lifeguards about your epilepsy Basic safety in the water when surfing Plans for Frankie's study abroad year in Spain... Frankie is hard at work on her own episode about her relationship with surfing, and how people have helped her through her diagnosis., so make sure you are subscribed to hear that episode later in the year. CONTENT WARNING: We talk about some close calls with surfing, and the potential consequences of having a seizure in water. Disclaimer: Please remember this is Frankie' personal experience. We take no responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions. SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Sign up for as little as $3 a month (that’s  less than the price of a coffee!!). All Patrons will get extra content every month, even between seasons, and Patrons at $5 and above get bonus episodes. Find out more at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License TRANSCRIPT ON ITS WAY. I am working to try and get accurate transcripts for all the Seize Your Adventure episodes. In the meantime, you can find most episodes on YouTube for auto transcription.
Chris is an Epilepsy Education & Outreach Worker for the British Columbia Epilepsy Society and in summer last year Chris also raised money for BCES by cycling from Prince George to Jasper - a distance of 375KM - in just two days. (N.B. I can't add up and in the podcast I say 275KM... Sorry Chris!) Chris is a hardcore adventurer. I was introduced to Chris about a year ago, via the British Columbia Epilepsy Society. Chris is an Epilepsy Education & Outreach Worker for the BCES. As well as his work for BCES, he’s also a ski instructor, and he did a BA in Nature Based Tourism at university. His Facebook page always shows beautiful pine forest, trees and rocks and rocks and trees and the odd lake. Chris' lifestyle, his career and his independence really relies on being healthy and able drive. We talked about: -His first seizure when he was 21 years old -Having to give up driving -Depression due to epilepsy -Reaching a moment of crisis due to depression -How his friends, family and colleagues supported him (and how some didn't...) -Laughing about his own condition -Working for British Columbia Epilepsy Society -His Facebook videos talking about epilepsy -Mitigating epilepsy risks in the backcountry -Leaving a trip line when going on solo adventures -Finding good friends to adventure with -Hiking the Chilkoot Trail in the Yukon -Turning to road cycling because he couldn't drive -His 375km cycling challenge... -And (of course) bears!! CONTENT WARNING: Chris talks about depression due to epilepsy, misuse of alcohol and a moment of crisis in this episode. If you want to skip that part of the chat, the conversation about his adventure life starts at 20 minutes. CONTENT WARNING 2: There is the smallest swearword in there. Disclaimer: Please remember this is Chris' personal experience. We take no responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions. If you have depression, or would like to talk to someone about your mental health and how you feel, if you are in the UK you can contact Mind for information and support or contact the Samaritans if you are in crisis. Those in Canada can contact Crisis Services Canada.  VISIT CHRIS' FACEBOOK PAGE: The Diaries of an Epileptic Dirtbag Otaku SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Sign up for as little as $3 a month (that’s $1.50 per episode - less than the price of a coffee!!). Find out more at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License
In this bonus episode we get to hear some more of my chat with mom, wife, teacher and blogger, Jewel Gibson. I asked Jewel to tell me a bit more about the specifics of have a baby when you have epilepsy. Last time, we heard about Jewel’s path to an epilepsy diagnosis, and her personal challenge of running the New York Half Marathon to raise epilepsy awareness. We also heard that Jewel is diagnosed with ‘catamenial seizures’ - seizures that are affected or triggered by changes in hormones. But I was also really interested to learn more from Jewel as a mom. As well as her blog, Jewel has also done a short podcast series called Well Fit Mama. So what does it take to be a Well Fit Mama? And how did epilepsy affect her pregnancy? I asked her about what steps she had to take to make sure both she and the baby were safe, and whether there was anything she wanted to say to other women with epilepsy who want to have children. Jewel was already a Mom, but she didn’t have epilepsy when she was pregnant the first time. A QUICK WARNING: Jewel does talk about the later stages of childbirth and aspects such as epidurals in semi-graphic detail around 7.30 minutes after the start of the actual conversation. Disclaimer: Jewel does talk about specifics with medication and birth choices. She is talking about her personal experience with pregnancy and childbirth whilst living with epilepsy. Other’s experiences and situation may vary. VISIT JEWEL'S BLOG: https://lifesajewel.com/ WELL FIT MAMA PODCAST: https://thewellfitmama.com/ SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Sign up for as little as $3 a month (that’s $1.50 per episode - less than the price of a coffee!!). Find out more at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. TRANSCRIPT ON ITS WAY. I am working to try and get accurate transcripts for all the Seize Your Adventure episodes. In the meantime, you can find most episodes on YouTube for auto transcription.
Jewel Gibson is a mom, a wife, a teacher,  and a blogger from Brooklyn, New York. Her Instagram and blog, Life's A Jewel, focuses on motherhood and encouraging women to live healthier lives, experience fulfilling relationships and conquer parenthood fashionably. She also uses her platform to talk about the day-to-day challenges navigating a seizure disorder. Jewel was an athlete and runner in highschool, so when she saw  an advert from The Epilepsy Foundation of Metropolitan New York about running the United Airlines Half Marathon, she figured it would be fun to try. She wanted to run to help eliminate the stigma about epilepsy and seizures, as well as raise awareness within the community. But when Jewel started training, she realised that her seizures and epilepsy were going to make running more difficult than she remembered! Jewel couldn't find any information on running with epilepsy, and how this might affect the way you train. She had to figure it out on her own and learn how to run without aggravating the condition.  In today's episode Jewel talks about: Her first seizures and difficult EMT experience The confusion between pseudo/non-epileptic seizures and epileptic ones The difficulty getting to her diagnosis of 'catamenial' seizures How her family supported her through her diagnosis Learning to accept help when her seizures were bad Hiding her epilepsy at work Starting a blog because she didn't see other Black people talking about epilepsy Why she decided to do the NY Half The COLD New York weather during training! How running makes her feel free The anxiety around seizures and when they might happen Deciding what to tell her students when she has a 72 hour EEG Balancing being a mom/wife/woman/teacher How the 'adventure' question made her realise how adventurous her life is! And more... DEFINITIONS: Catamenial  seizures - seizures that are affected or triggered by changes in hormones Pseudoseizures -  Now more commonly known as psychogenic seizures, which are not caused by electrical activity in the brain.  Also called Non-epileptic seizures (NES), dissociative seizures, non-epileptic attacks. The name 'pseudoseizure' is an older term. In the UK it is not used because it suggests the person is not having 'real' seizures. VISIT JEWEL'S BLOG: https://lifesajewel.com/ WELL FIT MAMA PODCAST: https://thewellfitmama.com/ SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Sign up for as little as $3 a month (that’s $1.50 per episode - less than the price of a coffee!!). Find out more at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License TRANSCRIPT ON ITS WAY. In the meantime, autotranscripts are on YouTube.
On Tuesday 19th May, I handed over the Seize Your Adventure Instagram account to Cath Shanks,  a skate coach who was diagnosed with temporal lobe epilepsy in 2010. In this bonus episode, you get to hear how it went, and listen to the Instagram Live interview we had afterwards. I've only discovered Cath recently, and her account @specialeptic is still new. But the account is a mix of great fun and heart-breakingly honest: "SOME DAYS.... some days are harder than others. some days are that little bit darker. some days it’s not even the seizures that are the problem. some days I think I’d rather have seizures than take meds. some days it’s just a little bit too much to cope with. some days I can pull myself out of the rut, some days I can’t. some days Epilepsy sucks WAY MORE than others. some days I just wish I had a different brain. some days, like today." Cath has also been learning to slackline during lockdown. Which is just so cool. You can see some of her progress on her YouTube channel. Cath talks about: Her cocktail of epileptic seizures Learning to skateboard as an adult Why an all-woman skateboarding lesson was perfect for her Having a seizure whilst teaching at summer camp How she got a job teaching skateboarding The comfort she has found in the epilepsy community Doing jigsaws in lockdown And more... Find Cath on Instagram as @specialeptic SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License This interview will have an auto transcript on YouTube soon!
For Jared Muscat, surfing has been a passion, an obsession, and in his own words an addiction, since he was a teenager. Surfing was part of what led Jared to his current job working for the outdoor clothing company Patagonia. And it was on Patagonia’s blog that I first read some of Jared’s story about surfing with epilepsy, his hard epilepsy diagnosis and journey, and a paddleboarding challenge he did to raise awareness for the condition. It slightly surprised me to realise that I haven’t had any sea-based adventurers on the podcast yet. The ocean has often offered ‘adventure’ in the traditional sense - the swashbuckling, finding new lands kind of adventure. But whilst the heyday of adventure on the high seas is over, in today’s conversation, we talk about how the power and unpredictability of the sea can still offer adventure of the everyday kind. In today's episode Jared talks about: Having brain surgery to stop seizures Not being allowed to surf post-surgery How yoga helped him with his recovery Whether removing his amygdala has affected his fear levels! How he got into surfing as a teenager His path to working for Patagonia How encouraging his Patagonia team have been Previous employer's discrimination because of epilepsy Paddleboarding when you can't surf 'Paddling Towards a Cure' - paddleboarding 17 miles for epilepsy awareness His reaction when doctors told him to stop surfing because of epilepsy What is Epileptic Opportunity? The importance of a good support network with epilepsy What 'adventure' means to him And more! READ JARED'S BLOG POST: Paddling Towards a Cure CONNECT WITH JARED: Instagram: @jaredamuscat SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. FOLLOW SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE: Instagram: @SYAdventurers Facebook: @SYAdventurers Twitter: @SYAdventurers MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License I AM STRIVING TO MAKE SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE ACCESSIBLE. TRANSCRIPTS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON THE WEBSITE.
Annie Brooks, is a blogger and Youtuber from the award-winning blog Tales of Annie Bean, a website and video channel that covers fitness, travel, lifestyle and  (of course) adventure! Annie was diagnosed with epilepsy in the form of complex partial seizures back in 2012, so a lot of her blog journey has been about learning to be active with the condition. She recently took on 12 in 12 challenges to raise awareness to the condition, and hopefully inspire fellow sufferers to keep healthy and active. Beyond her condition Annie covers a lot of travel and takes herself on a variety of adventures with her husband Nick and dog Winnie. In today's episode we talk about: How a blog about fashion became something very different The best things to do in California Camping in the Lake District Running a 10K at the Keswick Mountain Festival Annie's epilepsy diagnosis Learning to live with partial seizures How Annie started triathlons Doing 12 challenges in 12 months for epilepsy awareness Safely doing open water swimming with epilepsy (and why she loves it!) Training for an Ironman How having a seizure during a half marathon stuck with her Running the Brighton Half in a storm! Keeping fit in lockdown And much, much more! LISTEN TO THE FULL INTERVIEW ON PATREON SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons Attribution License
Enjoy this quick bonus episode from Jamie Wissinger, host of the epilepsy podcast '1 in 26' . I thought it was about time to share some official Seizure First Aid , and asked Jamie to share her knowledge as an official trainer. Be Calm Remove Dangerous Objects Always Time the Seizure If the person falls, turn them on their side Never put anything in their mouth As well as hosting 1 in 26, Jamie is a wife and a mama to three children and owns her own business. She has always had seizures, from being born two months early, to not having a breakthrough seizure until age 5, then a hiatus until age 21.  After having multiple seizures, in 2011, she decided to make a change.  She was unhappy with the way she looked, felt, and acted.  One day she decided she was no longer accepting that unhappiness and did everything she could to change her life. And it did.  Since then, she has grown mentally in ways that are amazing.  Just a few years ago she was filled with self doubt, couldn’t stick up for herself, lacked confidence and was surrounded by negativity. Now, she refuses to let that negativity bother her. It will always be there, the stress and the negativity but it is not about that, it’s about how YOU react to it.  It is her mission to support women who are affected by epilepsy and mentor them to pursue whatever they desire. Taking everything with one step at a time, it is her passion to inspire women  and not let their disability define who they are. LISTEN TO THE 1 in 26 Podcast ABOUT JAMIE: http://jamiewissinger.com/ ABOUT THE ANITA KAUFMANN FOUNDATION: http://www.akfus.org/ SUPPORT ME with SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure.
"Having a chronic condition such as epilepsy consistently prevents individuals from participating in sport. For someone with epilepsy the fear of making the condition worse, sustaining injury or even dying (Kale, 1997) are regularly quoted as reasons for very low participation levels, known to be as low as half that of the general population (Han, Choi-Kwon and Lee, 2011).” Ian Johnston was a very active football coach and runner before he started having seizures. Then, he became one of the 80% of people with epilepsy who are sedentary. But such a dramatic change in lifestyle prompted Ian to go to university. He wanted to study the reasons why he, and others like him, stop doing exercise when they start having seizures. We spoke about his path towards a Master in Clinical Exercise Physiology, his research and  findings and how  study the psychology of epilepsy and exercise helped him get back to exercise himself. In today's episode we talk about: Ian's life-long love of football Doing the Great North Run when he was 12 years old Being a football coach Having his first seizure when his was 48 The physical effects of epilepsy and medication The psychological  problems returning to sports after seizures Deciding to do a Clinical Sports Physiology Masters when he was 49 years old The difficulties doing a clinical course with a sports background How his degree helped him understand his own epilepsy Learning to take blood samples and EEGs Why 80% of people with epilepsy are sedentary Developing an exercise programme for someone with epilepsy The results of his dissertation: "CAN A COACH INFLUENCE A RETURN TO EXERCISE FOR THOSE WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS?" Plus, the footballer Leon Legge, Daniel Bedeau and more! LISTEN TO THE FULL INTERVIEW ON PATREON SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Tick Tick Tick by Logic Moon| Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License READ IAN'S FULL DISSERTATION on the website GET IN TOUCH WITH IAN by email READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPT at seizeyouradventure.com/transcripts
In this bonus episode, I catch-up with Becky Sampson. Four months after our initial conversation, coronavirus has changed plans for many. Becky tells me how it affected her round-the-world trip. In today's episode we talk about: Walking the Coast to Coast Track in Australia - in 9 days! Taking epilepsy medication across international borders The limits on anti-seizure medication for long journeys The unwanted side-effects of Sodium Valporate Seeing orangutans in Sumatra Being surrounded by monkeys in Angkor Wat without tourists Deciding whether to come back to the UK because of coronavirus Struggling to be repatriated Flying over the mountains in Cambodia Planning hikes in the UK Plus, what does 'adventure' mean to Becky? FIND BECKY: https://www.facebook.com/misadventuremagnet/photos SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Moon Fire by Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons License
Welcome to Season Two of Seize Your Adventure! This season, I will be speaking to even more people about a wider range of sports, and the conversations coming up in Season Two feel even more relevant in the current climate.   Today’s chat is with a lady called Becky Sampson. Becky is from the UK, but she hasn’t been based there for over three years now. She got in touch with me over a year ago when she was halfway through riding a bike across New Zealand. I was already pretty impressed and jealous of this fact, but she went on to tell me that she had already been riding in Canada and some of the US. And after New Zealand she was heading on to Australia and then planning to cycle the long way home through Asia and Europe.I really think the guests talking about accepting and adapting to limits. In today's episode we talk about: Cycling around the world Adapting her bike to her own needs Travel insurance for long-term trips The extra costs on travel insurance for having epilepsy Which epilepsy medications is available around the world Which epilepsy medication is difficult at border crossings Changing medications and the side effects Having a seizure in a forest How travel partners have reacted to seizures The cost of an ambulance, a sandwich and a drink... Nearly running over a bear on her bike in Canada! FIND BECKY: https://www.facebook.com/misadventuremagnet/photos SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. MUSIC: Moon Fire by Kev Rowe on Soundcloud | Creative Commons License
So this is actually a sneaky extra episode of Season Two because I wanted to add a little prologue before we get into the season. Most of the interviews in the first part of this season were recorded in a very different world to one in which they are being released. The UK and a lot of the world are on lockdown because of the coronavirus pandemic. And like many in the outdoor community, in some ways seems odd to be releasing a podcast about getting outside, adventuring, not washing for days in some cases, when at the moment I am advocating for the opposite - stay close to home, stay inside. But I do feel that this is what makes Seize Your Adventure is more relevant than ever. The podcast has always toed that narrative between access to the outdoors, and being cut off from it. In many of the stories and interviews in Season Two, we talk about losing the ability to drive to our favourite places, or being stuck in hospital when mother ocean is calling. This series dives even deeper in the ways epilepsy has limited adventurous people, and how more importantly how they have either adapted to these limits. A lot of my guests talk about the long path to acceptance of living with the condition - including the fluctuations in amounts of seizures and way what we are capable of can change so quickly. And we also talk about the mental health difficulties that can spring upon us even when seizure-free - things such as anxiety and depression that are difficult to attribute to either physiology of our brains, or the psychology. BECOME A PATRON! I have - finally, after much prompting - set up a new Patreon account! If you appreciate the work I do, you can support me with monthly payments of as little as $3, less than the cost of a drink! You can sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure Patrons get unique benefits and get to see some of the inner-workings of the podcasting life - from Outtakes episodes, to a Patron-only newsletter. It is a strange time in the world, and I think we can all do with a bit of good storytelling, adventure and heart-to-heart conversations in our lives. If you are in a position to support, I can continue doing this thing! READ BLOGS seizeyouradventure.com/blog
Hello everyone, I am Fran Turauskis and I’m happy to introduce you to Season 2 of Seize Your Adventure. This season continues to explore the concept of adventure on a spectrum. Over the past few months, I’ve been hunting down even more people living with epilepsy who enjoy the adventure lifestyle.  This season will have more ‘chats’ with guests. We talked about how the smaller adventures can help maintain a sense of self after a diagnosis, and how it has helped some people change their path in life. We’ll be hearing about even more sports, from cycling to surfing, and we’ll continue to shed a light on some of the hidden aspects of taking on adventures with epilepsy. The guests acknowledge the limitations of living with epilepsy everyday and also go into some of the consequences and risks of having seizures at the wrong time. Whatever your knowledge level of adventure or epilepsy, Season Two of Seize Your Adventure will help you explore what adventure means to you. Episode 0 is out on 30th March, hit the subscribe button now so you don’t miss it. In the meantime, you can head to seizeyouradventure.com for some blog posts, and follow @SYAdventurers on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Thanks for listening, and safe adventures! BECOME A PATRON TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST! You can now support Seize Your Adventure on Patreon. Patreon is a monthly donation platform to support creatives you believe in. You can pledge as little as $3 a month to help me run Seize Your Adventure. Head to https://patreon.com/seizeyouradventure to learn more. You can also make a one-off donation on Paypal at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure
The Outdoor Mindset

The Outdoor Mindset

2019-11-2729:57

In 2010, thirteen individuals got together in a hut in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The group shared a passion for the outdoors, an unyielding enthusiasm for life… and they also shared a link to different neurological challenges. These hardships could easily have led to a more subdued mindset. The thirteen people could have opted for a quieter, indoor life. But instead, they were inspired by one of the friends, whose diagnosis of a brain tumour encouraged him to use the outdoors as a way to cope, and a way to connect with others. That friend was Kyle Martin, and this meeting was the start of the organisation Outdoor Mindset (OM). Learn more about the Founders and members of the Outdoor Mindset community, and listen to how and why they chose to get outdoors and do adventure sports with conditions such as Parkinsons, MS, epilepsy and brain tumour. ABOUT OUTDOOR MINDSET: https://www.outdoormindset.org/ JOIN THE COMMUNITY: https://www.outdoormindset.org/get-involved Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OutdoorMindset/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/outdoormindset/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/OutdoorMindset DONATE TO OUTDOOR MINDSET: https://www.outdoormindset.org/donate SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE at seizeyouradventure.com/transcripts MUSIC: Groovy Guitar - LOOP by joshuaempyre | License: Attribution Groovy Guitar 2 - LOOP.wav by joshuaempyre | License: Attribution Lonely Lake by Kev Rowe | License: Creative Commons
This is not quite Seize Your Adventure, but rather a short trailer episode to send you off to another podcast. Over the past few months I’ve been working on an episode for another independent podcast called Out There. It looks at the big questions in life through our relationship with the outdoors, using storytelling. So it is with huge pride that I can say my episode was released last week. It’s called “The ‘Privilege’ to Choose” and I thought I’d give you a little taster: “In this episode, we’re going to be listening to a story about choice. Having the ability to choose can be something of a privilege. For some people, the choices they are able to make can become limited by factors such as income, responsibilities or health. But can having limited choice sometimes make things easier?” Head over to http://www.outtherepodcast.com/episodes to listen to the full story. FOLLOW OUT THERE: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/outtherepodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OutTherePodcast/ SUPPORT SYA! BUY MUGS, JOURNALS, & DONATE: https://seizeyouradventure.com/shop/ FOLLOW SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SYAdventurers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/syadventurers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/syadventurers/ And please listen, share, subscribe, rate… and don’t forget to tag when you do!
I get a lot of people contacting me. People who have adventurous souls and lived and breathed their sports before they started having seizures and were diagnosed with epilepsy. And the question I get asked most by people in this situation is “can I do this sport with epilepsy?”. And no matter what the sport is, my answer always has to be the same: “I cannot say”. I talk about a very valuable resource from the International League Against Epilepsy or ILAE that was recently shared with with. And I wish that I’d known about this sooner because it’s two tables that clearly lay out some guidelines for taking part in sports with epilepsy. One table is labelled ‘Seizure risk level in sport’ The second table is labelled ‘Recommended sport participation by seizure’. Listen to me talk about some of the sports on these tables, and advice on doing sports with epilepsy by the ILAE. You can find the tables by ILAE here:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/epi.13261 DISCLAIMER: All information presented in this podcast is for your information. I have not contributed to the classing of sports. I take no responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions. Risks will be different based on the sport and individual. Always speak to your neurology team. SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE at seizeyouradventure.com/transcripts FOLLOW SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SYAdventurers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/syadventurers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/syadventurers/ And tag when you listen, share, subscribe!
Three months in and seven challenges down, I am right on track with my #30at30forEpilepsy. In this bonus episode, you get to hear the seven lessons I have learned so far from ice climbing, archery, axe throwing, trail running, mountain biking, hiking at altitude and wild swimming. This is how I have safe adventures with epilepsy :) MENTIONS: Archery Fit Vertical Chill Sally Orange SayYesMore and the Yes Tribe Tough Girl Podcast and the Tough Girl Tribe Outdoor Mindset SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE at seizeyouradventure.com/transcripts
Amanda Plomp is a runner with epilepsy based in Victoria in Canada. As we heard in the last episode, discovering running in her twenties helped Amanda to feel strong and connected to her body, a feeling she had missed since her seizures started when she was a teenager. Running helps with her epilepsy. And epilepsy helps with her running.  In my conversation with Amanda, I was able to delve into this a bit more. I asked for her tips for me, as a new runner with epilepsy, and asked her to talk me through the different types of running terrain she enjoys. WE TALK ABOUT: How different seizures affect her running How running helps with epilepsy Hiking and camping in Canada Why Amanda chooses not to wear a medical alert bracelet Which is better: backwoods running, beach running or trail running? Running solo vs running races The difference between ‘active’ and ‘athletic’ The dangers of running solo in bear country Her advice for me running my first race with epilepsy How important it is to tell adventure buddies about your epilepsy Why we should teach raccoons seize first aid... Please remember all stories presented here reflect the personal experiences of contributors . Neither myself or contributors can advise or take responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions. TERMINOLOGY: Myoclonic seizures/jerks: partial seizures that cause isolated jerks or twitches, for example in the arms or legs  Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy of Janz: epilepsy with various seizures, including myoclonic, diagnosed before adulthood (read more) Tonic clonic: a seizure with loss of consciousness and convulsions  Packed trail: maintained dirt path or trail, usually marked MORE ABOUT AMANDA: https://tremorsofmyworld.blog/ JOIN ME IN AN ADVENTURE: https://www.francescaturauskis.co.uk/30-at-30 MUSIC: Where the Wild Things Grow by Kev Rowe | License: Creative Commons SUPPORT SYA! BUY MUGS, JOURNALS AND POSTCARDS: https://seizeyouradventure.com/shop/ FOLLOW SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SYAdventurers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/syadventurers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/syadventurers/ And tag us when you listen, share, subscribe! 
DISCLAIMER: Please remember all stories presented reflect the personal experiences of contributors . We take no responsibility for individual decisions made with regards to adventure sports or medical conditions.  For most people, the teenage years are a crucial period in finding out who we are. We try out lots of new things, we meet new people, we’re growing into new bodies and we’re starting to figure out the adult we will become. It is a period in our lives when we begin to define ourselves. So it’s a horrible irony that the teenage years are also a time that a lot of people start experiencing seizures. Today’s story comes from Amanda Plomp. Nowadays, Amanda defines herself as a runner, an athlete… and as an epileptic. But that wasn’t always the case. When Amanda started having seizures in her teens, it made her feel lost in her own body. Both the seizures and the medication she was prescribed to help stop them impacted on the activities that she enjoyed, and she hid her seizures from everyone, worried it would change what people thought of her.  In the end, it was running that helped Amanda reconnect with her body, and redefine her sense of self.  TERMINOLOGY:  Myoclonic seizures/jerks: partial seizures that cause isolated jerks or twitches, for example in the arms or legs  Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy of Janz: epilepsy with various seizures, including myoclonic, diagnosed before adulthood (read more)  Tonic clonic: a seizure with loss of consciousness and convulsions  Packed trail: maintained dirt path or trail, usually marked  MORE ABOUT AMANDA:  https://tremorsofmyworld.blog/  MUSIC:  Where the Wild Things Grow by Kev Rowe | License: Creative Commons  Bubblegum by Kev Rowe | License: Creative Commons  E I - 5.mp3 by cunningGnome | License: Attribution Noncommercial  SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Become a patron to support the podcast and continue telling stories of epilepsy in adventure. Find out more and sign up at patreon.com/seizeyouradventure. You can also make a one-off donation at https://www.paypal.me/seizeyouradventure. TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE at seizeyouradventure.com/transcripts FOLLOW SEIZE YOUR ADVENTURE:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SYAdventurers/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/syadventurers  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/syadventurers/  And tag us when you listen, share, subscribe!
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