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Star Wars 7x7: The Daily Star Wars Podcast

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, The Last Jedi, The Force Awakens, Star Wars Resistance, and more! The Star Wars 7x7 Podcast is Rebel-rousing fun for everyday Jedi, 7 minutes a day, 7 days a week. Destiny unleashed! #SW7x7 Join Allen Voivod for Star Wars news, history, trivia, movies, cartoon, comics, characters, vehicles, toys, books, and so much more. You get it all in just 7 minutes, so subscribe now!
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We were going to talk about the launch of Queen's Peril today. A couple months ago, I felt compelled to step out of the stream of our usual Star Wars talk, and we talked about the coronavirus pandemic, when the lockdowns were in their earliest stages. I never planned to make a habit of stepping out of the stream, and I still don't plan to. But as civil unrest has engulfed dozens of cities across the United States, I've been thinking a lot about Yoda's lines from The Phantom Menace: "Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering." And it seems like they could help us understand a lot of what's going on in America right now. As I said to a neighbor of mine recently, there will always be people, on all points of the political compass, who see tragedy as an opportunity to advance their own goals by exploiting other people's pain. I believe our job as humans, at a minimum, is to bear witness to the pain. To listen, to truly and deeply hear what people in pain are trying to tell us. To help heal that pain, and not make it worse or prolong it. Today's show is about how Yoda's words apply to our lives right now. In the process, I'm going to beg you to consider three things: 1. Please do what you can to keep your family, friends, loved ones, neighbors, and communities safe. 2. Despite all the fearful things happening that must be addressed, please do not lose sight of the inciting incident of the fires this time - the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed African-American man, by a while police officer, in broad daylight, and the justice that must be done in Floyd's memory. 3. Please consider saying that #BlackLivesMatter. Speaking for myself, I have a wishy-washy history with making that statement. Not that I ever disagreed with it - more that I've had the privilege of living a life where it wasn't a visible issue for me on a daily basis. But that's no excuse. Imagine if hundreds of millions of voices would speak out together, to let the African-American community know that they believe "Black Lives Matter." It wouldn't magically heal things, of course. But maybe it could be a different kind of inciting incident. One based in love, not fear. I hope the show today speaks to you, and I thank you for being a part of *this* community.
From novels to reference books, comics to documentaries, here's what we know is coming for Star Wars in June 2020 - and speculation about movies, live action series. animation, and more. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
"Legacy" is the second episode of the Disney+ series Disney Gallery: Star Wars: The Mandalorian. A snippet from that episode has been making the rounds on social media, wherein executive producer Dave Filoni talks about the meaning and the stakes of the lightsaber battle in The Phantom Menace. And I thought that's what we'd be talking about today... But as it turns out, there's also a rather important thing to examine regarding the telling of Star Wars stories with and without George Lucas, and - by sheer coincidence - Dave Filoni also talks about the Vader redemption that we were just talking about on yesterday's show. And it turns out that he and I may have been saying the same thing ... from a certain point of view. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
So here's how this happened... In looking at The Rise of Skywalker and comparing it to Return of the Jedi over the past few days, I've been thinking a lot about the theme of redemption in Return of the Jedi, and how it's the main theme for that movie, but only a secondary theme for The Rise of Skywalker. Well, the more I started thinking about Vader "redeeming" himself in Return of the Jedi, I got to thinking - is he, though? I'll explain my well-nigh sacrilegious take on this subject, and how the subsequent 37 years of storytelling supports the case - but you can make the case merely by what happens in The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. We'll also speculate as to how this may have made George Lucas decide to have Vader scream "NOOOOOO!" in the Special Edition. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
Imagine with me, if you will, a different Return of the Jedi. The primary protagonist/antagonist conflict is not with Luke and Palpatine, it's with Luke and Vader. And yet they don't spend a heck of a lot of time onscreen together. It's only near the end of the second act and into the third that they finally confront each other. Can you imagine what it would have been like if they encountered each other multiple times throughout the movie? Like, for example, if he got word that Luke was back on Tatooine, and headed out there? Now, contrast that with The Rise of Skywalker. Again, Rey/Palpatine isn't the real conflict here, it's Rey/Kylo. And their issues get a lot more attention... Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
When we looked at The Force Awakens, it was remarkable how much it lined up with the events of A New Hope. Then we looked at The Last Jedi, and while it had elements that lined up with The Empire Strikes Back, it also shook things up. Today, we look at The Rise of Skywalker. It has a lot in common with Return of the Jedi, but it actually explodes the structure of ROTJ, spreads it out across the movie, and even repeats those structural elements as the movie progresses. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
Return of the Jedi and The Rise of Skywalker start their bad guys in similar places. No one walking into Return of the Jedi ever thought that redemption was in the cards for Darth Vader. And - if you pretend you never saw the original trilogy - you would likely say the same thing about Kylo Ren while walking into The Rise of Skywalker. Thematically, however, Return of the Jedi is very concerned about the idea of redemption. And that shows up not just in the main conflict of the story, but also in smaller ways for Luke, Han, and Lando. (Leia? Not so much. What does she have to redeem herself for, after the events of The Empire Strikes Back? Not much, as it turns out.) Meanwhile, though The Rise of Skywalker does concern itself with the redemption of Kylo Ren after all, it's a secondary theme when considered in light of what's really going on thematically - a war of identity. I'll explain my thinking on today's episode... Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
As we dive deeper into our examination of The Rise of Skywalker, and the comparison of it to Return of the Jedi, structure is where we want to head next. But before we get there, there's a related pair of topics we need to consider. First is the question of the final boss battles - the "big bads," if you will. Because the primary job of both movies is for the heroes to strike the winning blow, and it needs to be against something that presents the greatest challenge our heroes have seen yet. And the other thing we need to consider is the timeframe. By an interesting coincidence - if it is, actually, coincidence - both of these final movies in their trilogies take place about a year after the events of the previous movie. There's a very clear reason for that in Return of the Jedi. As for The Rise of Skywalker, the answer is not so clear, but with the application of a couple of thought experiments, it turns out that it had to be closer to a year than the five or ten years we previously discussed on the show. I'll be addressing both the big bads and the timeframes on today's show... Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
Last week, we spent time talking about The Last Jedi, and comparing it to The Empire Strikes Back - which is similar to what we did a while ago when we talked about The Force Awakens in relation to A New Hope. Well, it's time to complete the cycle! On today's episode, we're starting a series of looks at The Rise of Skywalker, in comparison with Return of the Jedi. And in particular, we're going to pick up right where we ended with The Last Jedi - on the concept of recontextualization. Both Return of the Jedi and The Rise of Skywalker offer us changes that are supposed to make us rethink a bunch of things that came before in their respective trilogies. In one sense, they're very different - one of them comes completely out of the clear blue sky, while the other is relentlessly hinted at. And in another sense, they're very similar - the change doesn't add drama so much as it resolves it, and changes the foci of the final fights. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.***   
The end of 2019 was remarkable in a lot of ways for Star Wars. One of those reasons was The Mandalorian, the first-ever live-action Star Wars series. It was so remarkable, in fact, that Disney is putting together an eight-part series under the "Disney Gallery" banner to go behind the scenes of the creation of The Mandalorian. Today, we're following that series with a look at the first episode, "Directing." And we'll cite some notable elements about each of the directors. But as we go through this, we're also going to pay particular attention to Executive Producer Dave Filoni. This time, we'll get to hear him talk about this storytelling and animation background, leading up to his work on The Mandalorian. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
The "I am your father" reveal from The Empire Strikes Back is the ultimate "recontextualization" in cinema history. Recontextualization is a heavy word, one definition of which is: To place or view (a work of literature or art, for example) in a new or unfamiliar context, especially in order to suggest a different interpretation. As we've been comparing The Empire Strikes Back to The Last Jedi this week, we're going to wrap up the conversation with a discussion of recontextualizations. The Last Jedi has more than one of them, and so does Empire, for that matter. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
I hinted at us coming to this episode earlier in the week, about a thematic similarity between The Empire Strikes Back and The Last Jedi. Well, here we are now: ready to talk about failure. The Last Jedi wears this theme on its sleeve, so to speak - failure is actively spoken of, and Yoda identifies failure as one of the most important lessons Luke could ever have passed on to Jedi students. Luke, Leia, Rey, Poe, Finn, and Rose all faces failures in particular ways, and their character arcs are built around them learning lessons from those failures in order to succeed when things are at their darkest hour. As it turns out, The Empire Strikes Back is very much about failure, too. We watch the Rebels suffer their first major onscreen defeat; we watch Luke fail time and again with Yoda on Dagobah; for every heroic deed by Han, the odds against his success get worse and worse until finally it all comes crashing down; and Leia, our take-charge heroine, has all control taken away from her. We'll talk about this and more on today's episode... Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
There was a funny meme going around back in the day, which had two images, which were the same shot of protesters with torches and pitchforks. And one photo depicted people complaining about The Force Awakens for being too much like the Star Wars of old, while the second photo depicted the same people complaining about The Last Jedi for being too different from the Star Wars of old. Well, as it turns out, The Last Jedi has a lot more in common with The Empire Strikes Back than you might expect. Part of that is because of the setup J.J. Abrams gave Rian Johnson, and we'll explore those similarities (and a few differences) on today's episode. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
Last Friday, The Hollywood Reporter broke the rumor that Timothy Olyphant would be joining the cast of The Mandalorian for season 2, with this additional note: It is unknown whether the actor will play a new character or a returning favorite in a new guise. Yesterday, /Film broke the rumor that Olyphant will be wearing Boba Fett's armor on the show. But clearly, he does not look like Temuera Morrison. Here's what they had to say about that: ...Earlier this month it was reported that Temuera Morrison, who originated the role of Jango Fett (Boba’s clone father), had been cast as Boba Fett. So what’s going on here? If Morrison is playing the role of Boba Fett, then Timothy Olyphant is playing an enigmatic character named Cobb Vanth. Now, in a few recent episodes where rumors have been discussed, I've been able to share that someone reached out to me to share information from another person to confirm/deny media reports like this. Well, that someone let me know a thing or two about this particular set of rumors, and I'm sharing what I've heard on today's show. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
The May 2017 Vanity Fair cover story on The Last Jedi includes this: But Johnson, in drawing up his screenplay, decided to raise the stakes further. 'I started by writing the names of each of the characters,' he said, 'and thinking, What’s the hardest thing they could be faced with?' I think it's fair to assume that he didn't need to think too deeply about that question for certain characters - Threepio, Maz Kanata, Phasma, Snoke, DJ, Hux, Holdo, or Yoda. But I certainly believe he entertained that question, and deeply, for Luke, Leia, Rey, Kylo/Ben, Finn, Poe, and Rose. On today's episode, we'll talk about what The Last Jedi tells us about Rian's answers to that big question for each character. We'll also talk about how The Empire Strikes Back, whether we knew it or not, was doing the same thing to Leia, Luke, and Han all those years ago. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
In October 2017 (before the release of The Last Jedi), Rian Johnson spoke at an "Ireland Week" event to talk about the movie. The Hollywood Reporter quoted him as saying: "That very last image of The Force Awakens, with Rey holding the lightsaber out to Luke, that was so evocative. In every other case, Star Wars movies jumped forward in leaps of time. I knew I was supposed to do that, but the last image was intriguing. I knew I wanted to know where we were going next." Later on in the article, there was a direct interview with Johnson, and I wanted to flag this question and answer for you: Q: Part of [Star Wars] is recontextualizing past movies. How does yours do that? A: Each new film hopefully recontextualizes what came before it. That’s part of the game. Yes, it’s a continuation of not only The Force Awakens, but also of the legacy leading up to it. These, along other past comments from Johnson, are going to come into play as we set the stage to discuss how The Last Jedi is similar to and different from The Empire Strikes Back on today's episode. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
It's time for another episode of Star Wars POP! That's "Podcasters on Podcasting," and for today's episode, I'm joined by Bryan and Chris from Sixth Scale Scavengers. Here's their scoop: Sixth Scale Scavengers is a Hot Toys collecting podcast with a focus on the Star Wars, Marvel, and DC Comics licenses. The co-founders Bryan Fontaine and Chris Leddy created the podcast and later this website as resource for collectors of all experience levels to learn and interact with the collecting community. You will find checklists and databases of all the Hot Toys figures released to date with product information, release dates, and helpful links to scavenge your own collecting deals. Each podcast episode covers news, collecting tips, featured collecting topics, and figure reviews in each episode. On today's episode of the show, I'll be talking to them about their podcasting history, inspirations, and much more. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
While we were spending the last couple of days talking about the question of whether Boba Fett is an actual Mandalorian, and going down all sorts of Legends rabbit holes and so forth, a couple of news items related to season 2 of The Mandalorian hit the airwaves. One of them was great news from Disney CEO Bob Chapek on the status of post-production for the hit Disney+ series. The other - a casting rumor about Katee Sackhoff reprising her animation role in live action as Bo-Katan Kryze from The Clone Wars, which could be great news if it happens - seems not to be getting the same kind of juice that previous casting rumors have gotten. I'll explain on today's show... Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.***   
I got a lot of feedback about my episode yesterday, exploring the idea of whether Boba Fett is, in fact, a Mandalorian. Turns out I got a little too narrow with my focus on a couple of things! So on today's episode of the show, I'll be handling some corrections (the clan signet doesn't have to be on the right shoulder, for example). I'll also be getting into a few elaborations - specifically about the Mandalorian icon on Boba Fett's left shoulder, and the emblem on the right side of his chest plate. And after all of that, which will dig deeply into Legends territory, I'll dig my heels in and assert that I still don't think Boba Fett is a Mandalorian in the "practicing" sense of the word. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
It may seem an odd question to consider at first. After all, I think the segment of the Star Wars audience that cares about such things has generally accepted the idea that Boba Fett is a Mandalorian. But as I did my research for yesterday's episode about whether Boba Fett survived the sarlacc pit, and how his potential appearance in The Mandalorian could be as much about the armor as it is about the person within the armor, I also got to thinking about Boba Fett's history himself. Which led me to Jango Fett, and to questions of citizenship, and birth versus cloning, and pauldrons, and I promise you this will make sense in the episode itself. Ultimately, it seems there are two primary ways of answering the question of whether Boba Fett is a Mandalorian. One way, the answer (with certain caveats in place, so as not to go too far into the weeds) is a yes. The other way - arguably, the more important way of considering the question - the answer is a hard no. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 
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Comments (7)

Sukma

watch on www. kingmovie11 .com ,,Buy the movie to pay for wifi, boss let's move closer

Dec 15th
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Luke Saengvanich

I ♥️ Star Wars😁😁😁😁😁😍😍

Nov 21st
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Jason Hedman

great show delivering everything we need to know about our favorite franchise!

Jun 4th
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Walker One

I have now watched the Last Jedi 2 times and then I watched the Lucas movies. I have watched the clone wars. There is a story line there. The last Jedi dosent carry that story forward. It treats those movies like myth and legends. they treat those movies with contempt. I don't think people who are fans will like this. I think they are killing this story line on purpose. I think they see it as a tether that needs to be cut in order to expand the universe and they are going down a path I can't follow. Rogue one showed they could expand the universe with out messing with this story line but I can't see how they will win the trust of the fans back?

Dec 26th
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