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Stoic Meditations

Author: Massimo Pigliucci

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Occasional reflections on the wisdom of Ancient Greek and Roman philosophers. More at patreon.com/FigsInWinter. Please consider supporting Stoic Meditations. (cover art by Marek Škrabák; original music by Ian Jolin-Rasmussen, www.jolinras.info). Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
503 Episodes
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Epictetus bluntly tells us that if we have not been affected by philosophy and have not changed our mind about something important as a result of it, we are simply playing a game. So, has philosophy changed your mind yet?--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Don't be angry, be useful

Don't be angry, be useful

2019-10-2500:02:25

When someone is wandering about our city because they have lost their way, it is better to place then on the right path than to drive them away.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
The common lot of mortals

The common lot of mortals

2019-10-0300:02:32

Every time we lose a loved one it means that we have, in fact, loved. So we should not be resentful for what the universe has taken, but rather thankful for what it has given.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Believe me -- says Seneca to Marcia -- [women] have the same intellectual power as men, and the same capacity for honorable and generous action.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Seneca reminds his friend Marcia, who had lost a son a couple of years later, that it is better to be thankful for what she had, rather than resentful for what she has lost.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Everything we think we have is actually on loan from the universe, so to speak, and we need to be ready to give it back whenever the universe recalls the loan, no matter in what form it does it.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
According to Chrysippus, when it's all said and done, there are only three conceptions of the chief good for human beings.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Aristo, the Stoic dissenter

Aristo, the Stoic dissenter

2019-09-1700:03:20

Aristo of Chios disagreed with the founder of Stoicism, Zeno of Citium, in pretty fundamental ways. A powerful reminder that Stoic philosophy isn't written in stone, and never was.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
The basic Stoic psychological account of our desires and actions is a powerful guide to willfully change our behavior for the better.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Let's learn why the middle-Stoic Panaetius disagreed on a major point of "physics" with the early Stoics: he didn't believe in divination!--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Skeptics vs Stoics

Skeptics vs Stoics

2019-09-1200:02:58

The Academic Skeptics were one of the major rival schools to Stoicism. Yet, on the nature of human knowledge, and on what it means in practice, for everyday living, the two philosophies were not very far apart.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
If you have some sand and you start adding grains, when do you have a heap? Chrysippus' answer to this sort of paradox will leave logicians frustrated and the rest of us with something to think about.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
The wisest approach is to not commit to opinions until we have strong evidence in their favor, or to hold opinions very lightly, and not attach our ego to them.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Stoic materialism

Stoic materialism

2019-09-0900:02:47

The Stoics are materialists, in the sense that they believe that anything that has causal powers must be made of stuff, whatever that stuff turns out to be.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Virtue can only be perfected by reason; all virtues are really just one, namely, wisdom; virtue is intrinsically good; and one needs to continuously practice in order to be virtuous.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
What Zeno said

What Zeno said

2019-09-0500:03:45

Zeno of Citium, the founder of the Stoic sect, says that there are three sets of things in the world: virtue, things according or contra to nature, and neutral things. From which a solid moral compass for everyday living follows.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
The importance of Socrates

The importance of Socrates

2019-09-0400:02:44

Socrates was the first to draw philosophy away from matters of an abstruse character, in which all the philosophers before his time had been wholly occupied, and to have diverted it to the objects of ordinary life.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Cicero begins his treatise Academica by seeking a medicine for his sorrows in philosophy.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
Blame is not a Stoic thing. We bear responsibility for what we do, of course, but to blame people isn’t particularly useful. As Marcus Aurelius says, teach them, if you can, or bear with them.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
And what is this Good? I shall tell you: it is a free mind, an upright mind, subjecting other things to itself and itself to nothing.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stoicmeditations/support
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Comments (23)

Facundo Pegue

explain please ayn rand and stoics ,thanks

Feb 1st
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ID

fantastic antidote to the current news cycle.

Jan 18th
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Sonal Pandey

Awesome episodes, only wish the content were a bit longer than the ads.

Jan 9th
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Facundo Pegue

amazing. thank you maximo.

Dec 11th
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Facundo Pegue

amazing

Dec 6th
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Ben fox

o

Dec 6th
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Ben fox

o

Dec 6th
Reply

Facundo Pegue

thNks to you. amazing

Dec 5th
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Facundo Pegue

amazing episode. thank you. and i'm reading meditations. the best way of reading and learning it's with your teachings podcasts. thank you

Nov 27th
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Facundo Pegue

amazing, thank you.

Nov 23rd
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Facundo Pegue

amazing, thank you.

Nov 20th
Reply

Facundo Pegue

thank you

Nov 17th
Reply

Facundo Pegue

thank you.

Nov 7th
Reply

Facundo Pegue

thank you

Nov 7th
Reply

moody

Love your podcast but would be awesome if you made something a bit longer

Oct 11th
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Pablo Ribeiro

Fantastic. It's incredible how it's easy for us to forget this kind of simple and important thing.

Oct 3rd
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Jussie

great advice. Thanks for the reminder.

Sep 26th
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Craig LaCasse

I love these podcasts. I had to laugh, though, after the first listening, when I heard "Recorded with Anchor." I missheard Anchor and thought the word used was anger.

Jun 9th
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Jussie

a fantastic way of getting huge chunks of advice/wisdom in short bursts. no need to get drowned in info that some audio books thrash out. just listen to 1 or 2 or 3 episodes a day, or none. it doesn't matter really, when you do listen again you'll have maximised 2 minutes of your life and widened your perception. Not sure about the recent addition of cheesy music though.

Apr 11th
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Rose Hearse

I like these short meditations but the sound balance between the content and the advert makes it difficult to listen to. I have to turn my volume up to hear the content, then skip or turn it down quickly before the ad comes on. I'd like to accept some suffering in life, but I can find stoic teaching podcasts with better sound quality so right now I prefer those other podcasts over this one.

Feb 10th
Reply (1)
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