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Stuff You Missed in History Class
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Stuff You Missed in History Class

Author: iHeartRadio

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Join Holly and Tracy as they bring you the greatest and strangest Stuff You Missed In History Class in this podcast by iHeartRadio.

1549 Episodes
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Jim Thorpe was an incredible all-around athlete, famous around the world. In part one, we’ll talk about his life before and during his time at Carlisle, including some context about Carlisle and similar boarding schools. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2018 classics covers Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte, who was the first Native American woman to earn a medical degree. She lived at a time when a lot of change was happening in the United States as a whole, and among Native Americans and the Omaha tribe she was part of specifically Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly talk about the three people who are linked together in the story of the surgical treatment for cyanotic babies, including stories that didn't make it into this week's episodes. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
In 1944, Thomas developed a surgical treatment for babies with cyanotic heart conditions. Thomas was a Black man working at an institution whose only other black employees did janitorial work, and he had not attended medical school – or even college.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Helen’s story is tied to Vivien Thomas and Alfred Blalock in the surgical treatment of blue baby syndrome. She was the one who suggested that Alfred Blalock try to find a surgical approach to congenital heart conditions like tetralogy of Fallot. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2016 episode covers Icelandic history. A fishing territory dispute between Iceland and the U.K. started off with a cordial tone, but escalated into a serious conflict. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly talk about the sexism that held back Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin,the desire to see her lecture notes, and stories from their education. Talk then turns to Maria Anna Mozart and the gaps in the record that lead to different interpretations of the Mozart family dynamics. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Maria Anna Mozart

Maria Anna Mozart

2020-11-1138:206

Maria Anna Mozart is often left out of brief accounts of her brother’s life. But his sister was sharing the bench with him and was also considered an impressive and accomplished musician.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

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Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin was an astronomer who made a lot of firsts. She grew up in a society that didn’t really prioritize education for girls, and she was determined and creative about getting around that. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This episode from 2015 covers the Night Witches, an all-female bombing regiment in the Soviet Air Force. Flying biplanes meant for dusting crops and training new recruits, they dropped 23,000 tons of bombs on German forces in WWII. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly discuss the wealth of unearthed stories that came up this time around, as well as their favorite finds from this batch. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Part two of our autumnal unearthing report includes shipwrecks, exhumations, repatriations, and quite a bit about Vikings, and a bit of potpourri.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
It's once again time to take a look at things that have been literally and figuratively unearthed over the last few months. In part one of this Autumn 2020 edition, we'll talk about books and letters, edibles and potables, animals, and some other stuff.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Happy Halloween! To celebrate, we're revisiting a 2014 episode. Candy and Halloween go hand-in-hand, but when did candy become the standard for trick-or-treating, and who invented the holiday's most famous sweet treats like candy corn?  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly and Tracy talk about their experience with tarot cards and readings, and about the bad rap black dogs get. Happy Halloween to all of our listeners who celebrate it! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
As we inch closer to Halloween, we're talking about three of the MANY supernatural canines and hellhounds that have lengthy histories in our collective storytelling. Two are similar and from England, and one is a fun figure from southern Louisiana. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
How did a card game gain a reputation for being connected to mysticism? Tarot's history takes a significant turn in the 18th century, but much of that shift in perception is based on one author's suppositions and theories. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
We're revisiting a 2011 episode today. In 1908, a fire leveled the Indiana home of Belle Gunness. Four bodies were found in the cellar, and it seemed possible that Gunnes might have escaped. When about a dozen more bodies were found, Gunness was revealed as a serial killer. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly and Tracy talk about the work and life of Bram Stoker, including a brief talk about his mother. And then talk turns to Tracy's new interview with Kate Landdeck, and the glamour of Jackie Cochran. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Dr. Katherine Sharp Landdeck joins the show for a second time, to talk with Tracy about Kate’s new book – but mostly about Jacqueline Cochran – who was an incredible pilot, and one of the driving forces behind the Women Airforce Service Pilots. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Comments (264)

TroyMax

You got this one way wrong I think I wonder how much of your other information is worth listening to.any men you could say were the king but Crockett was a politician and died a drunkard from everything I’ve ever read. He never did anything from his exploits, he just could talk the talk. Jim Bridger, Danile Boone, Jedidiah Smith, Hugo Glass, Lucien Bonaparte Maxwell, so many people from those times did so much. I would put Daniel Boone at the top he opened so much of the East. They are not talked about because they did one thing people don’t like they worked as meat hunters for the companies building trails and roads into these areas. Crockett nope he just spread his stories in saloons from what I’ve read.

Nov 22nd
Reply

Remley

I knew a Tokyo rose broadcaster. Mrs Mio. The name will mean nothing to anyone, except for those who knew her or her husband. Her US Army colonel husband who served in WW2 had died before I met her, but Mio was a US citizen a real sweetheart at 87 years ago and one of the most humble people I've ever met. I met her while working for the American Red Cross, she worked as a volunteer for most of her life, after the war in 2001 through 2006. She was the most beautiful person I ever met, perhaps physically during her youth, but in her soul she was an amazing Japanese American lady who had the most fascinating stories of walking all night for 12 miles out to the nearest pow prison camp, passing intel and providing medical supplies and food to American and British POWs. When she needed $1200 hearing aids, our staff chipped in to pay for them, and "worked for her" over the weekend often, she paid $15 per day to help out at her food truck 15 years ago, thinking that she was paying well. lol, Honestly the, we would have worked for free to help provide for her as veterans and realativesbof veterans she might have helped. I'll always love and miss Mio.

Nov 13th
Reply (1)

Michael Carr

great episode.

Oct 15th
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Jory Simmons

As a matter of fact he owed her an education and more for his continued raping of his slave. He took full advantage of his position, she had NO choice in the matter!! How can you say he was a good slave holder?!? Slavery is wrong, period. Rape is wrong period. This was a terrible episode. This was embarrassing as an African American Woman.

Oct 13th
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Jory Simmons

I don't care how well YOU think he treated his slaves, it was slavery. You wouldn't want to be a slave, so why would you think this can be humanized because of who he was? He raped Sally Hemmings, do you think any slave desired to sleep with the person who is holding her as property?? I understand his gifts to society, but you have this one all wrong...

Oct 13th
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ID19619055

If I’ve missed it I apologize. An episode on the Chinese Exclusion Act would be good.

Oct 9th
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ID19619055

I wonder if an episode on private companies donating tons of money to political campaigns is in order? Could end with Home Depot and Chic Fil A as examples.....

Sep 22nd
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TJ Dogflower

Was looking for a new podcast saw this and thought it would be perfect as I love history. This podcast might be interesting but after 2 episodes I gave up. Most of the episodes is just advertisement. I've listened to others who spend a lot less time pushing their advertisers. This one is ridiculous. Why not call it the advertising channel??!?

Sep 3rd
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Kayl matthew

fuck. Of course they turn this into their bullshit agenda and not about the white house.

Aug 29th
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Reanna Marie Brown

when the topic of torture comes up the two that always first pop into mind for me are Bamboo torture & Rat torture. The first (Bamboo) was of course in areas where bamboo was readily found .. as you may already know - bamboo grows incredibly fast & is just as strong. so they would take & tie someone up lying down &placed over top of a new bamboo shoot that they would have cut the top at a sharp angle. the bamboo would then slowly (but quickly ) grow straight up into the body being several inches deep within just a few days & eventually all the way through. This was of course incredibly painful, but not enough to kill someone (depending on the placement of course) so a great technique for confessions.. the injury would grow to be greatly infected though, of course, & given the medicine on hand at the time would ultimately end in death due to the infection. i believe Mythbusters actually tested this out on one of their silicone dummies & found it to be true. the second (Rat Torture) also would end in death if not immediately from injuries, then due to infection if you confessed enough to get the torturers to stop.. they would take a rat & place it on a person's stomach under some sort of cage or bowl & on top of that place hot coals so the rat inside would be frantically trying to escape - &being that its options being a metal cage or bowl or the soft squishy flesh of a human belly, the rat would then try to claw & dig its way out thru the victims torso. a very slow & lainful death whether from the rat digging a hole thru your middle or of the biwl was pulled off in time then from the infection that soon followed in the wounds from the bites & scratches inflicted by the dirty germ (&whatever else- hell probably black plague) infested rat. 🤢 okay, just had to share ! lol go

Aug 21st
Reply

Lleighsha D.

Sally Hemmings was 14 when she went to Paris and was free while there. Jefferson coaxed her back saying any children they had would be free. She was never freed, but only 'given her time'. This romanticized version is just hard to listen to. He 'trusted his slaves' to build his house?? Free forced labor is not a show of trust. Fear of what might happen to them if the work was not done is what drove those people. They spent their whole lives building a house, only to be sold along side the house at an auction. I want to unhear this so badly.

Aug 21st
Reply (2)

Victoria Muchiri

Great content. I'd really love to transcribe your podcasts. People who are deaf, hard-of-hearing, non-native speakers, or suffer from auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder may have trouble following a fast conversation. Transcription provides an avenue for them to absorb everything you are putting out. My email is vickies2cents@gmail.com. Thank you.

Aug 9th
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Elizabeth Armstrong

I love the Kevin Costner one. but the Disney one is cute too.

Jul 30th
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Elizabeth Armstrong

omg this esp is funny this person is a character in the outlander book series. another set of book you most read.

Jul 30th
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Elizabeth Armstrong

what interesting is they have put it in the book series discovery of witches. if you haven't read these series you so should

Jul 29th
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mant

👏👏👏

Jul 29th
Reply

Mike Coffey

Wow what a load of BS and a general waste of time.

Jul 28th
Reply (1)

Dwayne Hillis

#History

Jul 6th
Reply

Elizabeth Armstrong

stop with the ads in the middle of the podcast

Jun 30th
Reply (1)

Elizabeth Armstrong

having ads in the middle of the pod cast isn't something that should be done

Jun 29th
Reply
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