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Stuff You Missed in History Class
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Stuff You Missed in History Class

Author: iHeartRadio

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Join Holly and Tracy as they bring you the greatest and strangest Stuff You Missed In History Class in this podcast by iHeartRadio and HowStuffWorks.
1374 Episodes
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Holly was joined in the studio by historian Dr. Calinda Lee to talk about her work with the Atlanta History Center, and specifically the new exhibit "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow." Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Leicester Hemingway

Leicester Hemingway

2020-02-2400:39:366

Leicester Hemingway's life was very much lived in the shadow of his brother. It isn’t until after Ernest Hemingway’s death that Leicester made his boldest moves in life.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2015 episode revisits an event that was half performance for the British troops, and half actual sham. It led to an attack on Dover by the Pennacook tribe in 1689. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly and Tracy cover their experiences with croquet and historical stories that didn't fit into the episode, and then discuss the challenges in researching North America's indigenous nations histories when most narratives are written by white colonists. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
King Philip’s War

King Philip’s War

2020-02-1900:40:208

King Philip’s War was an armed conflict primarily between English colonists and Indigenous nations in what’s now New England, although there were some Indigenous peoples who were allied with the colonists.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Croquet History

Croquet History

2020-02-1700:34:425

Croquet's origins are murky, but because of its relative ease of play and low barrier of entry, it went through a surge in popularity almost as soon as it was documented. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
We're revisiting a 2015 episode, where Holly chats with archaeologists Patricia Capone and Diana Loren about Harvard's Indian College, the school's importance to Colonial history and the ongoing archaeology of Harvard Yard. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Tracy and Holly discuss the nuances of the Equal Rights Amendment's history, and the whaling industry that we discussed in the biography of Quaker Paul Cuffe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Cuffe protested taxation, built wealth for himself in whaling, became a Quaker and used his fortune for the betterment of others. He was also an advocate creating a colony in Africa that people of African ancestry could immigrate to in search of a new life. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
The first version of the equal right amendment was first proposed almost 100 years ago. This amendment has been through cycles of support and opposition, but one thing that’s held true is that the loudest voices on both sides have been women. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This 2017 episode delves into the story of the Jamaican Maroons. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Jamaica's Maroon communities clashed with British colonial government. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly and Tracy talk about George Sand's defiance against social convention, and the difficulty in discussing certain aspects of their most recent episode on activism. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
We've talked about sit-ins on the show before. This time, we’re looking at other -ins – direct action demonstrations and similar protests that have some similarities to the sit-in movement.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
She was an incredibly famous writer of incredible output. Her behavior and personal style were almost as talked about as her novels, and these factors combined made her into a figure that was admired by many, despised by some, and completely fascinating. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
The Freedom Rides were happening at about the same time as the sit-in movement of the 1960s that we talked about this week – and involved some of the same people. Previous hosts Sarah and Deblina did two episodes on the Freedom Rides in the U.S. in September of 2011, and we’re playing them both together.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Holly and Tracy discuss one of Caspar David Friedrich's paintings that wasn't part of the episode on him. They also discuss Tracy's experience in school not including the Greensboro sit-ins, and how that Woolworth's has become a museum. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
David W. Collins recently sat down for a conversation with Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez to talk about their Oscar-nominated songwriting work on "Frozen II" and their shared love of music. That two-part special episode will start next week, so be sure to subscribe to The Soundtrack Show wherever you listen so you don't miss it! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
On Feb. 1, 1960, four students sat down at a segregated lunch counter at the F.W. Woolworth’s in Greensboro, North Carolina. It started with just four of them, but others joined, and sit-ins were taking place around the U.S. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Caspar David Friedrich

Caspar David Friedrich

2020-01-2700:32:438

Friedrich's painting career, most closely associated with the German romantic movement, continues to influence and inspire artists today. In his own time, his work was both lauded and controversial, and then fell out of favor for decades. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
This is two 2010 classics from previous hosts Katie and Sarah, covering the relationship of Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson, the abdication crisis that resulted, and their sympathies for the Nazi party. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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