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Stuff You Missed in History Class
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Stuff You Missed in History Class

Author: iHeartRadio

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Join Holly and Tracy as they bring you the greatest and strangest Stuff You Missed In History Class in this podcast by iHeartRadio.

1604 Episodes
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Holly and Tracy talk about Holly's childhood perceptions of Isadora Duncan and how the famous dancer broke convention. They also talk about the peccadillos of Duncan's autobiography, and her relationship with sexuality. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Isadora Duncan, Part 2

Isadora Duncan, Part 2

2021-02-2437:525

The comforts afforded by fame were forever clouded for Duncan by an ongoing series of tragedies, leading right up to the famous – and horrifying – way her life ended. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Isadora Duncan, Part 1

Isadora Duncan, Part 1

2021-02-2240:155

Duncan, often called the mother of modern dance, had an unconventional upbringing, and a VERY unconventional life. Her early life was full of struggle but seemed overall quite happy. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
This 2012 episode covers the 1936 Berlin Olympics and African-American sprinter Jesse Owens, as well as the games as Nazi propaganda. More nations than ever participated, and the Olympic torch was used for the first time. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Tracy and Holly talk about how young everyone had been during the Mississippi Freedom Summer, voter suppression, and Holly's trick to stop crying when recording. There's also talk of how topics get added to phone lists. and Cobb's violin playing. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
W. Montague Cobb was the first Black person in the U.S. to earn a PhD in physical anthropology, worked to debunk racist theories in the field, was an activist for desegregation and Medicare, and was an anatomy professor at Howard University.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
The Mississippi Summer project of 1964, now known as Freedom Summer, was a in part a voter registration project that was met with an extremely violent and deadly backlash. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
This 2018 episode covers Gertrude Stein, an icon in the world of modernist literature. Alice B. Toklas is often described as her partner and assistant, but she was also a published writer, and "assistant"really doesn't cover how important she was to Stein's life and work. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Tracy and Holly talk about Spain's effort to spread the smallpox vaccine, and how Balmis handled things. They also discuss fear about vaccines, bodily autonomy, and what does and doesn't gross them out. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
With the smallpox vaccine established, Spain’s wanted to deliver it to its colonies in the Americas and the Caribbean. Francisco Xavier de Balmis carried the vaccine from Spain to the Americas using a chain of young boys who acted as living vaccine hosts. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Once Edward Jenner developed the smallpox vaccine, it spread from England, where he lived, to other parts of the world. Meanwhile, events were unfolding that led the Spanish Empire to launch a huge expedition to take the vaccine to its colonies.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
This 2013 episode covered the Nazca lines in the desert about 200 miles southeast of Lima, Peru, between the Andes Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. The glyphs have remained intact for centuries, and have been avidly studied since their discovery in the late 1920s. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Holly and Tracy talk about how many things don't make it into episodes, sometimes due to cutting for narrative structure, and sometimes due to translation of sources. They also discuss Emilie Du Châtelet and the various ways her story is told. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Émilie du Châtelet

Émilie du Châtelet

2021-02-0345:136

Du Châtelet challenged the philosophic and scientific world of her time, but she's often eclipsed by her far more famous lover. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Tello is often called some variation of the father of Peruvian archaeology or the first indigenous Peruvian archaeologist. And his work was playing out across a backdrop of constant unrest and conflict, both for his country and his profession.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
A throwback to 2013! Sir Joseph Paxton was a 19th-century botanist who became instantly famous for the hall he designed for the Great Expo of 1851. After the expo, the Crystal Palace moved to a new location and became the centerpiece of the world's first theme park. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Holly and Tracy talk about the fascination of the Griffith story and how contemporary journalists covered Griffith's crime, as well as how his story ties to Disney history. Tracy also discusses how delightful it was to pull together the research on Andrew Crosse. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
In the early 1800s, Andrew Crosse observed a strange thing happening on an electrified rock in his lab, and he was catapulted into the public spotlight. But before that and after, his life and home at Fyne Court were filled with eccentric delights.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Griffith J. Griffith

Griffith J. Griffith

2021-01-2542:433

While the Griffith name today is associated with the Los Angeles park and the observatory, during his time, G.J. Griffith was associated with other things: real estate, social climbing, and a horrifying domestic abuse scandal. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Part two of this 2018 classic delves into the only known successful coup d'etat in U.S. history, when a white mob enacted a violent plan against their town’s black community, and overthrew the duly elected government of Wilmington, North Carolina. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
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Comments (291)

Stacy Stanley

Excellent episode. I have but a small criticism, and that is regarding the condescending way you brought up and immediately dismissed views of the other side of the voter suppression issue. "There are no sides. There is only truth and not truth" os something to that effect, followed by the suggestion that the internet has plenty of information to debunk the non-truth. That approach will never change minds. Sometimes we have to spell it out for those who are wrong, and we have to maintain at least a modicum of politeness in order to hold their attention. I agree with you, and I still cringed

Feb 22nd
Reply

Alex K.

95% it was a white supremacist who defaced the Jim Thorpe books. Same thing has happened at Govett's Leap in the Blue Mountains West of Sydney Australia. A plaque mentions that Charles Darwin visited there, and everywhere his name is mentioned, it is graffitied out. Like Thorpe, it doesn't change history. Knuckle dragging ignoramuses are common, a mind like Darwin or body like Thorpe isn't.

Feb 9th
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Win Nie

why did I listen to this. 😔

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

He grew up in Romania I think.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

I would rather die than eat myself. nor will I eat anyone else just to survive a short life of less than 100 years.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

this was hilarious 🤣💀

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

I love this podcast

Jan 28th
Reply

Sya Oberhausen

💩

Jan 28th
Reply

Sya Oberhausen

Samson option? Anyways who cares....who profits.....#SYMIHC

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

I hate wars.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

I had nightmares about Al after I wrote an essay about him over 6 years ago.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

1731 wasnt that long ago.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

He gets an A for effort.

Jan 28th
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Win Nie

TroyMax They are discussing topics and giving their opinion on it by saying fact or fiction. if you have a problem with this podcast content from 2008, then you should probably go to the library and read instead of listening to people discuss their thoughts abouts history.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

I love eggnog

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

776 B.C what the heck. and Zeus? isn't he a fictional greek god?

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

now its 2021.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

that is a curse. the fact that people died from all those diseases. they shouldn't have went in there. 🤣

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

its 2021. I'm sure they're dead now.

Jan 28th
Reply

Win Nie

this podcast is almost older than me. I was 6 in 2008. 🤭

Jan 28th
Reply
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