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Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff
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Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Author: Rebecca Minkoff

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What are the secrets behind some of the most successful women in the world? Each week designer Rebecca Minkoff talks to women from all walks of life, from CEOs to artists, and shows us what life is like without the pretty filters in order to help you navigate what it means to be vulnerable, how loss can make you stronger, and other ways to make your inner superwoman shine. Join us in being Superwomen, together!

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
63 Episodes
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This episode is sponsored by Capital One Spark Business.Pregnancy  can be overwhelming, especially the first time around. Your body is changing,  hormones are shifting, and you just want to know which nail polish won’t  be harmful to your baby.CEO Ericka Perry found herself in a pickle when her best friend needed help finding pregnancy and beauty products, but there was not one place where she could simply order a gift bag with the necessary items. At a time when subscription boxes were really starting to take off, she couldn’t believe this was still lacking in the market. Thus was born the The Stork Bag.Almost entirely self-funded, Ericka is a shining example of an entrepreneur who sees an opportunity, works what they know and creates a business for the love of the products and who they serve.Thanks for listening! We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big IdeasThe inevitable self-doubt that comes with running a business. [15:52]Financial reality of growing a business that is self-funded. Slow growth is okay! [20:43]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
Nicole Lapin may be a financial expert, but that doesn’t mean she was born knowing an index from an S&P fund. Growing up in challenging conditions, not the least of which was being a first generation American, Nicole always knew she wanted to be in news. She took it upon herself to get a job in the industry and slowly started working her way up through agencies in smaller cities around the U.S.A true “fake it ‘til you make it” story, Nicole jumped headfirst into the opportunity to report on finances even though she had little experience in the field. Now in her 30’s and considered a financial expert, she “rethinks conventional financial wisdom,” writing books that educate women and help them to take control of their finances as well as their mental health.Thanks for listening!Don't forget to follow us on Instagram to learn how to win a copy of Nicole's latest book, "Becoming Super Woman."Big IdeasHow self-care, boundaries and balance are of the utmost importance to mental health. [10:49] and [24:30]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
This episode is sponsored by Capital One Spark Business.If you’ve ever been a teenage girl, or if a teenage girl secretly lives within your heart, you’ve probably lusted after the iconic, candy-colored hair dyes made famous by Manic Panic.Coming of age in New York in the 1970’s, Tish and Snooky were born performers. The sisters have always been artists at heart; they credit their love of color (and glitter!) to their artist mother. Pursuing singing careers and partying at iconic clubs such as CBGB, the pair were constantly complimented on their signature punk style. The persistent fanfare encouraged them to open a punk boutique selling all the items they loved, a first of its kind. Not surprisingly, their wild hair colors were the number one seller. It was a natural progression to pursue production and private labeling of the product.Business women by day and performers by night, Tish and Snooky still turn it up, touring periodically and performing with the likes of Blondie and RuPaul. These women do it all, gardening, cooking, singing, CEO’ing – they are truly the baddest of baddass feminist rock stars.Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big IdeasFeminism in the 70’s vs. present, and the challenges of working as female entrepreneurs. [06:06]The ways in which technology and constant connectedness have made working more complicated. [11:05]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
Laura Brown came up in the 80’s – a period devoid of the internet and Instagram, where fashion inspiration came almost exclusively in the form of magazines. To make things worse for a young fashionista living in Australia, as Laura did, those magazines arrived three months after their release date. Laura was hungry for the glitz and the glam, and made it her goal to one day work and live in the heart of the fashion world.After working a few stints at magazines in Australia and London, Laura arrived in New York. Finding herself at a lavish Marc Jacobs show within days of moving there, Laura finally felt the pulse of the life she had so long been yearning for.After working her way up to Features at Harper’s, she was then hired as Editor in Chief at InStyle. In the three years since, Laura has revitalized the magazine, injecting new life into it, forever showcasing her love of fashion, layouts, and a good dose of creative, hard work.This episode is in partnership with SAP Success Factors.Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big IdeasThe excitement and satisfaction of pulling off creative, hard work. [11:25]Advice for those interested in working at a magazine. [19:41]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
We’ll  address the big question first: Christina Stembel of Farmgirl Flowers really did  grow up on a farm. Growing up in northern Indiana, Christina was expected to  fulfill her womanly duties as a wife and mother while her brother went  off to college. But Christina had other plans. She hightailed it to New York within two weeks of  graduating from high school and started working.Christina did not grow up with a lot of people cheering her on and wishing her success, and that made her strive for it all the more. Over some years and many different ideas, she saw that the floral industry held an opportunity to do exactly what she desired in starting her own business: disrupt the status quo, create scalability, and do good in the world.While not without its challenges (who knew the floral industry could be so cutthroat?), Christina has scaled from 56K her first year of business to $31 million 8 years later. As Christina fondly says, success is the best revenge.(In partnership with Capital One Spark Business)Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big Ideas Less than 3% of women get funding from venture capital. Discussing the disparity in capital support between male and female founders. [09:36]The value in trusting your instincts. [32:00]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
This episode is in partnership with SAP Success Factors.Dee Poku remembers what it was like when she worked for big movie studios. No need to make her own travel plans, or worry about her computer getting fixed. All that was taken care of; just walk out the door and a car will be there to take you where you need to go.All that changed when she decided strike out on her own, and it took some adjusting. Dee could no longer let the weight of her employer’s name bolster her confidence. It took time to be able stand tall and tell people about an enterprise they had never heard of. Her self-assuredness grew, however, and Dee saw how people responded to her differently simply by the way she delivered her message.Today Dee is the founder of multiple ventures aimed at supporting women in business. Her events encourage women to work towards positions of leadership, give them skills necessary to navigate the male-dominated workforce, and let their creativity shine.Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big IdeasThe payoffs inherent in taking a grassroots approach, calling upon those you know, and creating a greater network to support your movement. [11:40]The critical importance of raising girls who are comfortable talking about money and asking for what they need. [22:26]How the term “empowerment” has become problematic. [29:10]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
Bed. We spend a third of our lives there, and yet oftentimes, our beds, or what we put on them, become somewhat of an afterthought.Ariel Kaye sought to change that. After spending some years in advertising, Ariel came to a point where she was looking for more excitement, and more of a direct way to connect with people. She had always been passionate about interior design and home goods, going so far as to maintain her own blog on the subject in her free time. As she was pondering a change in career, it dawned on her that there were little to no direct to consumer options for bedding. That is when the idea for Parachute Home was born.Now in its fifth year and about to open the fifth brick and mortar (!), Ariel fondly recalls the early days when she would drive around in her car, delivering orders directly to buyers in Los Angeles.Growth and success have come with their own challenges. Here Ariel discusses entrepreneurial ups and downs, what makes her passionate about her company, and how at the heart of it all it’s really about building relationships.Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big IdeasThe changes that come with viewing your business as relationship-based rather than transaction-based. [15:56]The invaluable importance of knowing your customer base well and growing with their needs. [17:27]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
 This episode is in partnership with SAP SuccessFactors.She’s self-described as “messy” and can play the piano by ear – as long as it’s in the key of C. No, we’re not talking about Katy Perry – Katie Couric is here, she’s caffeinated, and she’s ready to sing for you!A household name for decades, it only makes sense that after years in broadcast news, Katie has finally taken the entrepreneurial plunge and started her own media company. Excited to tackle controversial issues and educate the public, Katie is taking the reigns as her own boss to share timely stories in her uniquely sympathetic, yet fearless voice. One of the greatest interviewers of our time, Katie reflects upon the fact that it is the balance between being kind and being tough that drove her career to its success. Now in a new era, Katie continues to inspire women of all ages to ask questions, be fearless, and learn to move gracefully through moments of discomfort. Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big Ideas The value in bringing positive energy to the workplace. [15:01]Ageism as being socially acceptable, and in contrast, the beauty and gifts inherent in aging. [18:26]The importance of true listening and fruitful communication. [33:05]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
 Jill Kargman is not your neighborhood soccer mom and she doesn’t play one on TV, either. Her dark sense of humor and love of all things goth might put her out of place at most “mommy and me” gatherings, but this is especially true on the swanky Upper East Side where she originates. However, Jill isn’t one to waste her time worrying about what other people think. Instead, she worked her alchemical writing magic and spun this into comedy gold, using her position in society as inspiration for the screenplay – turned book – turned TV show, Odd Mom Out. She also plays the feature role in the show, utilizing the talent honed from acting in numerous plays during her time at Yale. Jill’s creative journey has taken her from arduous internships to writing rooms to the confines of her home office and back again. Jill now plans to return to the big screen as she sets out to script a film inspired in earnestness by the life of her teenagers. Thanks for listening! We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big Ideas Trusting yourself and listening to your gut. [12:55]“Better sorry than safe.” The importance of pushing beyond your comfort zone to do the things that are important to you. [30:58]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
This episode is in partnership with SAP SuccessFactors.How would your life be different if you were less afraid to make mistakes, to “fail”? Amy Shecter doesn’t think women let themselves fail enough, and she thinks it’s high time we become less risk-averse. Statistically, she says, women will only take risks when they feel 95-100% confident in a favorable outcome, versus the average man, who will take the same risk at only 50% confidence. And what, really, is there to lose? Most of the time a supposed failure simply means you’re that much closer to the next success. Amy spent years in fashion and footwear before delving into the world of fitness and beauty. She immediately saw it as an expanding consumer market. Now the CEO of Glamsquad, a company that brings hair, nail and makeup artists to your door, Amy finds excitement not only in great products and services for clients, but also in the fact that Glamsquad gives freelance beauty professionals a platform to support themselves. Thanks for listening!We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here, or visit https://anchor.fm/superwomen/messages on your desktop or phone to leave us a voice memo! Follow Superwomen on Instagram.Big Ideas Why saving time is so valuable to consumers. [09:15]H-Commerce - the home as a new basis for services and revenue. [11:20]“Competition” as an opportunity to seed the market. [18:28]--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support
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