DiscoverTED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing
TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing
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TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

Author: TED

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TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).
117 Episodes
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Before empires and royalty, before pottery and writing, before metal tools and weapons – there was cheese. As early as 8000 BCE, Neolithic farmers began a legacy of cheesemaking almost as old as civilization. Today, the world produces roughly 22 billion kilograms of cheese a year, shipped and consumed around the globe. Paul Kindstedt shares the history of one of our oldest and most beloved foods.
It’s late, pitch dark and a self-driving car winds down a narrow country road. Suddenly, three hazards appear at the same time. With no human at the wheel, the car uses smart eyes, sensors that’ll resolve these details all in a split-second. How is this possible? Sajan Saini explains how LIDAR and integrated photonics technology make self-driving cars a reality.
Anna Komnene, daughter of Byzantine emperor Alexios, spent the last decade of her life creating a 500-page history of her father’s reign called “The Alexiad.” As a princess writing about her own family, she had to balance her loyalty to her kin with her obligation to portray events accurately. Leonora Neville investigates this epic historical narrative.
In 2004, a nutrition company offered a life-changing opportunity to earn a full-time income for part-time work. There were only two steps to get started: purchase a $500 kit and recruit two more members. By 2013, the company was making $200 million. There was just one problem -- the vast majority of members earned less than they paid in. Stacie Bosley explains what a pyramid scheme is and how to spot one.
Reaching heights of over 100 meters, Californian sequoias tower over Earth’s other 60,000 tree species. But even these behemoths seem to have their limits: no sequoia on record has been able to grow taller than 130 meters. So what exactly is stopping these trees from growing taller, forever? Valentin Hammoudi investigates why trees have limited heights.
Humans have been battling heartburn for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. But recently the incidence has risen, making it a common complaint worldwide. What causes this problem, and how can it be stopped? Rusha Modi details the causes and treatments of heartburn.
Since their emergence over 200,000 years ago, modern humans have established communities all over the planet. But they didn’t do it alone. Whatever corner of the globe you find humans in today, you’re likely to find another species as well: dogs. So how did one of our oldest rivals, the wolf, evolve into man’s best friend? David Ian Howe traces the history of humanity’s first domesticated animal.
In 2012, a team of researchers set a world record, transmitting 1 petabit of data— that’s 10,000 hours of high-def video— over a fifty-kilometer cable, in a second. This wasn’t just any cable. It was a souped-up version of fiber optics, the hidden network that links our planet and makes the internet possible. What is fiber optics, how does it work, and how is it evolving? Sajan Saini explores the vital technology.
The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn out into a cold nothingness. Renée Hlozek expands on the beauty of this dark ending.
You are made of polymers, and so are trees and telephones and toys. A polymer is a long chain of identical molecules (or monomers) with a range of useful properties, like toughness or stretchiness -- and it turns out, we just can't live without them. Polymers occur both naturally -- our DNA is a polymer -- and synthetically, like plastic, Silly Putty and styrofoam. Jan Mattingly explains how polymers have changed our world.
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Comments (26)

Mandy

1:22

Jul 12th
Reply

kagimub

this is insightful. thank you

Jul 10th
Reply

daniel Tyler

THANK YOU

Jun 29th
Reply

TheUltimateNerd14

great work guys

Jun 20th
Reply

Benny Hung

I would really like to hear your every episode. but the memory size of every episode is too high than other poscast even than ted-ee video on youtube. Maybe it can be a comment to consider. Thank you

May 1st
Reply

Romeo tyRamos

Poor CPU

Feb 23rd
Reply

Aetheryl

Short and simple, but sweet. Gives a few things to mull over in the mind.

Jan 16th
Reply

Ngọc Võ

how i can find its transcript when i am listening this video!

Jan 15th
Reply

Ngọc Võ

Hà Đăng Huy thanks u !!!

Jan 17th
Reply

Hà Đăng Huy

Ngọc Võ there are severals ways for u. u can download ted apps or watiching this video from youtube. they have transcript for u

Jan 17th
Reply

Trung Duong

test funtion comment

Dec 18th
Reply

Trung Duong

test funtion xomment

Dec 18th
Reply

Rija Kunwar

ok

Dec 15th
Reply

India. Charlie. Echo

Jesus is the cure to every cancer

Nov 17th
Reply

Nancy Lapus

sent some dunno dunno such lab com some*999

Oct 1st
Reply

Nancy Lapus

being don dude Zumba class heal com has One funny hold all p his him but all pk I'll look to doors in

Oct 1st
Reply

Nancy Lapus

sent so come to fall cus silly to do such to bind

Oct 1st
Reply

naven krishnakumar

Dont you think, this can also be considered as overthinking.....?

May 16th
Reply

Ruwan Manjula

E

Apr 16th
Reply

Zahid Ali

audible podcasts (only audio) plzz

Mar 11th
Reply

Shelley Wang

The narrator's voice is so soothing

Dec 25th
Reply

luny Toon-ny

360°000.000.000 km / sec tome phi phi

Nov 28th
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