DiscoverTED Health
TED Health

TED Health

Author: TED

Subscribed: 208,629Played: 974,979
Share

Description

What does exercise do to your brain? Can psychedelics treat depression? From smart daily habits to new medical breakthroughs, welcome to TED Health. TED speakers answer questions you never even knew you had, and share ideas you won't hear anywhere else, all around how we can live healthier lives.
220 Episodes
Reverse
The cells in your body are like computer software: they're "programmed" to carry out specific functions at specific times. If we can better understand this process, we could unlock the ability to reprogram cells ourselves, says computational biologist Sara-Jane Dunn. In a talk from the cutting-edge of science, she explains how her team is studying embryonic stem cells to gain a new understanding of the biological programs that power life -- and develop "living software" that could transform medicine, agriculture and energy.
For intersex people -- those born with sex characteristics outside the traditional definitions of female and male -- the stakes to appear "normal" are high. Drawing on her personal experience, Susannah Temko reveals the shame, prejudice and harm faced by the intersex community, as they're forced to conform to a binary understanding of sex that ultimately hinders their health and well-being. She calls on us all to discard outdated notions of biological sex and accept the complexity within humanity.
After a terminal cancer diagnosis upended 12 years of remission, all Elaine Fong's mother wanted was a peaceful end of life. What she received instead became a fight for the right to decide when. Fong shares the heart-rending journey to honor her mother's choice for a death with dignity -- and reflects on the need to explore our relationship to dying so that we may redesign this final and most universal of human experiences.
Between 2006 and 2016, the number of drug patents granted in the United States doubled -- but not because there was an explosion in invention or innovation. Drug companies have learned how to game the system, accumulating patents not for new medicines but for small changes to existing ones, which allows them to build monopolies, block competition and drive prices up. Health justice lawyer Priti Krishtel sheds light on how we've lost sight of the patent system's original intent -- and offers five reforms for a redesign that would serve the public and save lives.
Many of the symptoms of menopause -- hot flashes, night sweats, insomnia, memory lapses, depression and anxiety -- start in the brain. How exactly does menopause impact cognitive health? Sharing groundbreaking findings from her research, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi reveals how decreasing hormonal levels affect brain aging -- and shares simple lifestyle changes you can make to support lifelong brain health.
Over a century ago, one part of our DNA got labelled the "sex chromosomes." Science journalist and Radiolab producer Molly Webster explains the consequences of that oversimplification. This is an excerpt from the TED Radio Hour episode The Biology of Sex. To listen to the whole episode, and to browse many other episodes from the podcast, find the TED Radio Hour wherever you're listening to this.
Countless poets and writers have tried to put words to the experience of a panic attack— a sensation so overwhelming, many people mistake it for a heart attack, stroke, or other life-threatening crisis. Studies suggest that almost a third of us will experience at least one panic attack in our lives. So what exactly is a panic attack, and can we prevent them? Cindy J. Aaronson investigates. [Directed by Aim Creative Studios, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by André Aires].
What if we could use biology to restore our balance with nature without giving up modern creature comforts? Advocating for a new kind of environmentalism, scientist and entrepreneur Emily Leproust rethinks modern sustainability at the molecular level, using synthetic biology to create green alternatives. From lab-developed insulin and disease-resistant bananas to airplanes made of super-strong spider silk, she explains how reading and writing DNA can lead to groundbreaking innovations in health, food and materials.
Difficult emotions can get under your skin if you're not careful. Sport and performance consultant Jessica Woods calls this the "jumping cholla effect," inspired by a sneaky kind of cactus that detaches and burrows its spines into unsuspecting passersby. In this empowering talk, she shares four mood-regulating strategies to help you gain self-awareness of your feelings, avoid catching other people's emotions and perform at your peak -- whatever the prickly situation may be.
In ancient Greece, the best-known remedy for a long-standing headache was to drill a small hole in the skull to drain supposedly infected blood. Fortunately, doctors today don't resort to power tools to cure headaches, but we still have a lot to learn about this ancient ailment. Dan Kwartler shares what we know (and don't know) about headaches. [Directed by Sharon Colman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Miguel d'Oliveira].
TEDxSHORTS: Tal Zak

TEDxSHORTS: Tal Zak

2021-03-0205:082

Today we're sharing another podcast from TED: TEDx SHORTS. Chief Medical Officer of Moderna Tal Zaks offers a look into the future of personalized medicine and how tailored vaccines might someday be used in the fight against cancer. This talk was filmed at TEDxBeaconStreet. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading. If you enjoyed this episode, you can subscribe to TEDxSHORTS wherever you’re listening to this.
When catastrophe strikes, art prevails—and has done so for centuries. In this fascinating talk, writer and director Cara Greene Epstein places the closing of theaters during the coronavirus pandemic in a historical context, exploring how we can use this intermission to imagine a more just, representative and beautiful world, onstage and off.
Today we're sharing another podcast from TED: How to Be a Better Human. Have you been feeling isolated or emotionally vulnerable lately? Loneliness is universal and while we can experience it at any point in our lives, we may be feeling it now more than ever. In this first episode, Guy Winch explains why your emotional health is so important and how you can find the support you need right now—from cutting through the small talk to finding a deeper appreciation for what you already have. Drawing on extensive experience helping patients repair broken connections, we’ll explore how loneliness influences well-being—and Guy will offer strategies for practicing emotional self-care. Guy is a licensed psychologist who works with individuals, couples, and families. As an advocate for psychological health, he has spent the last two decades adapting the findings of scientific studies into tools his patients, readers, and audience members can use to enhance and maintain their mental health. As an identical twin with a keen eye for any signs of favoritism, he believes we need to practice emotional hygiene with the same diligence with which we practice personal and dental hygiene. If you enjoyed the episode, you can subscribe to How to Be a Better Human wherever you're listening to this.
Alzheimer's doesn't have to be your brain's destiny, says neuroscientist and author of "Still Alice," Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease -- and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer's-resistant brain.
As a sex educator, Emily Nagoski is often asked: How do couples sustain a strong sexual connection over the long term? In this funny, insightful talk, she shares her answer -- drawing on (somewhat surprising) research to reveal why some couples stop having sex while others keep up a connection for a lifetime.
In 1970, marijuana was classified as a schedule 1 drug in the United States: the strictest designation possible, meaning it was completely illegal and had no recognized medical uses. Today, marijuana's therapeutic benefits are widely acknowledged, but a growing recognition for its medical value doesn't answer the question: is recreational marijuana use bad for your brain? Anees Bahji investigates. This is a TED-Ed lesson directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Addison Anderson, with music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang.
Trauma and PTSD rewire your brain -- especially your memory -- and can unearth destructive emotional responses when stirred. Could we eliminate these triggers without erasing the memories themselves? Enter neurologist Amy Milton's mind-blowing, memory-editing clinical research poised to defuse the damaging effects of painful remembered experiences and offer a potential path toward better mental health.
School can be rife with stress, anxiety, panic attacks and even burnout — but there's often no formal policy for students who need to prioritize their well-being. Hailey Hardcastle explains why schools should offer mental health days and allow students time to practice emotional hygiene without stigma. Follow along to learn how she and a team of fellow teens transformed their advocacy into law.
You use your brain's executive function every day -- it's how you do things like pay attention, plan ahead and control impulses. Can you improve it to change for the better? With highlights from her research on child development, cognitive scientist Sabine Doebel explores the factors that affect executive function -- and how you can use it to break bad habits and achieve your goals.
Stories help you make sense of your life -- but when these narratives are incomplete or misleading, they can keep you stuck instead of providing clarity. In an actionable talk, psychotherapist and advice columnist Lori Gottlieb shows how to break free from the stories you've been telling yourself by becoming your own editor and rewriting your narrative from a different point of view.
loading
Comments (40)

Iman Abbasian

great.thank you

Apr 1st
Reply

Hydroid

Thanks for the great feedback.https://www.tellpizzahut.online/

Apr 1st
Reply

Hydroid

love it thank for the valuable information… https://www.tellpizzahut.online/

Apr 1st
Reply

Rich Lipset

Please cut out the distracting background sounds they interfere with the valuable information you are providing.

Mar 18th
Reply

km

False hope. Tau will ravage your "neural reserve" just the same and there is nothing anyone can do to stop it (yet). How about investing more in science, scientists, and fundamental understanding of the disease. The current investment is paltry given the size and impact of this problem. And why toil as a scientist when you get a fraction of the career and financial security of what for easier pursuits might bring you. Culture must change. Many of the brightest minds are optimizing click-bait today instead of working on this.

Feb 10th
Reply (1)

Allan Poshel

What scares me is that my daughter got involved with bad company. She started smoking, drinking and coming home late. My conversations with her had no effect. One day, I got so desperate that I just cried and my daughter was moved by it. She promised me that she would "quit" the whole thing. However, she couldn't keep it up for long. Then we decided to find a solution at https://drmental.org/teen-counseling-review and we have only positive emotions. My daughter has blossomed again and we have a great relationship again.

Jan 18th
Reply

Ati M

some incorrect information!

Jan 10th
Reply

Lillian Priante

Will this help with Non- 24 disorder? Patients with blindness need help.

Oct 30th
Reply

solaleh bani

great😍

Oct 23rd
Reply

Sherry Falls

Great info

Oct 13th
Reply

Andrea Farland

wow that was really dumb. didn't even explain what the enhancer is or what it is made of. I find this really hard to take seriously.

Sep 15th
Reply

Ken Hiner

Please make more Ted health episodes. Thanks

Feb 26th
Reply

Cristinaluxe

Stop it? Humanity is the biggest virus on earth. We should all stop breeding and let the earth restore itself without the parasites

Feb 18th
Reply

Richard Reznicek

The,

Feb 16th
Reply

Joni Stasiak

this isn't 100 percent accurate as most states have multiple Medicaid managed care plans, so the burden of billing multiple insurers would still exist.

Oct 30th
Reply (1)

거울에다스크류바

omg she's the best

Oct 26th
Reply

Stu Cook

What a fascinating talk this was! Seeing how much the heart is actually susceptible when it comes to our wellbeing makes me want to ensure that I'm looking after myself all the more knowing a little better today than I did yesterday about the synchronicity between heart and emotional state.

Oct 16th
Reply

Alexandra Victoria

it amazed me at how our hearts actually change due to our emotions! absolutely brilliant

Oct 15th
Reply

Desiree MacDonald

I can't take that lip smacking sound in the background...oh my God it's so hard to focus on what shes saying

Jul 11th
Reply

Christian Velez

Sleep is so vital! Yet we ignore it.

Jun 19th
Reply
loading
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store