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TED Talks Education

Author: TED

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What should future schools look like? How do brains learn? Some of the world's greatest educators, researchers, and community leaders share their stories and visions onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.
100 Episodes
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Reading slowly -- with her finger running beneath the words, even when she was taught not to -- has led Jacqueline Woodson to a life of writing books to be savored. In a lyrical talk, she invites us to slow down and appreciate stories that take us places we never thought we'd go and introduce us to people we never thought we'd meet. "Isn't that what this is all about -- finding a way, at the end of the day, to not feel alone in this world, and a way to feel like we've changed it before we leave?" she asks.
Early education is critical to children's success -- but millions of kids in the United States still don't have access to programs that prepare them to thrive in kindergarten and beyond. Enter the UPSTART Project, a plan to bring early learning into the homes of children in underserved communities, at no cost to families. Education innovator Claudia Miner shares how UPSTART is setting four-year-olds up for success with 15 minutes of learning a day -- and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)
Ethan Lindenberger never got vaccinated as a kid. So one day, he went on Reddit and asked a simple question: "Where do I go to get vaccinated?" The post went viral, landing Lindenberger in the middle of a heated debate about vaccination and, ultimately, in front of a US Senate committee. Less than a year later, the high school senior reports back on his unexpected time in the spotlight and a new movement he's leading to fight misinformation and advocate for scientific truth.
Lindsay Amer is the creator of "Queer Kid Stuff," an educational video series that breaks down complex ideas around gender and sexuality through songs and metaphors. By giving kids and their families a vocabulary to express themselves, Amer is helping to create more empathetic adults -- and spreading a message of radical acceptance in a world where it's sometimes dangerous to just be yourself. "I want kids to grow up and into themselves with pride for who they are and who they can be," Amer says.
Reading and writing can be acts of courage that bring us closer to others and ourselves. Author Michelle Kuo shares how teaching reading skills to her students in the Mississippi Delta revealed the bridging power of the written word -- as well as the limitations of its power.
In the early 1990s, a scandal rocked evolutionary biology: scientists discovered that songbirds -- once thought to be strictly monogamous -- engaged in what's politely called "extra-pair copulation." In this unforgettable biology lesson on animal infidelity, TED Fellow Danielle N. Lee shows how she uses hip-hop to teach science, leading the crowd in an updated version of Naughty by Nature's hit "O.P.P."
Kakenya Ntaiya turned her dream of getting an education into a movement to empower vulnerable girls and bring an end to harmful traditional practices in Kenya. Meet two students at the Kakenya Center for Excellence, a school where girls can live and study safely -- and uplift their community along the way. "When you empower a girl, you transform a community," Ntaiya says.
To get young kids to thrive in school, we need to do more than teach them how to read and write -- we need to teach them how to manage their emotions, says educator Olympia Della Flora. In this practical talk, she shares creative tactics she used to help struggling, sometimes disruptive students -- things like stopping for brain breaks, singing songs and even doing yoga poses -- all with her existing budget and resources. "Small changes make huge differences, and it's possible to start right now ... You simply need smarter ways to think about using what you have, where you have it," she says.
How do we make sense of a world that doesn't? By looking in unexpected places, says mathematician Eugenia Cheng. She explains how applying concepts from abstract mathematics to daily life can lead us to a deeper understanding of things like the root of anger and the function of privilege. Learn more about how this surprising tool can help us to empathize with each other.
There's no greater freedom than finding your purpose, says education advocate Ashweetha Shetty. Born to a poor family in rural India, Shetty didn't let the social norms of her community stifle her dreams and silence her voice. In this personal talk, she shares how she found self-worth through education -- and how she's working to empower other rural youth to explore their potential. "All of us are born into a reality that we blindly accept -- until something awakens us and a new world opens up," Shetty says.
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Comments (19)

MaruMarimar

Children before 3 years old shouldn’t be in front of a screen! Play and nature are the keys

Sep 9th
Reply

ASIA TAI

blessing by god you believe.

Sep 7th
Reply

Nikole Branch

AWESOME

Sep 7th
Reply

Gauri Menon

this was such an interesting talk! the part that intrigues me the most is that professors using actual data can see what concept proves to be most difficult for students to understand and perhaps reconstruct the way of teaching that concept. perhaps they can explain it differently or use more examples to improve understanding of the concept. But very interesting talk. I also wonder though if language plays a role. for instance a child learning in India or in Africa having the lecture transcribed into their own native tongue affects the level of understanding.

Aug 6th
Reply

Emmanuel

Gauri Menon Great talk!!

Aug 6th
Reply

Matt Erickson

I'm a hetro male.. was bullied for being different.. until I learned to fight back. as a kid, due to other factors, I entertained suicidal thoughts.. so, question is posed: chicken or egg? is suicide higher because of identity or is it because of the emotional turmoil that accompanies the identity issues? and in the mention of a 7yr old that suicides over being gay? I can't imagine a prepubescent child even being able to self identify as gay. I have however met guys who's mothers had made them dress as girls, which really messed them up. anyhow, I don't buy the statistics listed here. too many unknown variables.. not enough data to rule out other feasible diagnoses

Jul 30th
Reply

Yves Jenkins

Matt Erickson I agree with you!!!

Jul 31st
Reply

Kori Kipchoge

Bless you!

May 25th
Reply

Naraphit Bhaddhajaree

Thanks so much

Feb 17th
Reply

Evelia Lledo

5

Feb 2nd
Reply

Gianpaolo De Biase

Superb talk. Very informative for the layman.

Jan 3rd
Reply

john young

A self-proclaimed proponent of free thought unironically campaigning for state funded moral indoctrination. 5 stars.

Nov 30th
Reply

David Keyte

I've just started my own podcast focusing on teaching. lots of banter and stories from the classroom, I'd love it if you gave it a go any maybe even subscribed: https://castbox.fm/va/1491119

Nov 29th
Reply

Nicole Sarah Kingi

America has segregation.. why not teach american kids their own history?

Nov 12th
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Mara Gonzalez Souto

One of my favorite TED Talks!

May 13th
Reply

Douglas Giel

This speaker did not address the home life of these black and brown students. What is important, stressed, in the home? Is the home broken? Are both parents committed to seeing the education of their children the the most important thing each child does every day? most parents would agree that if education is stressed at home, if time is taken to encourage students to study, if the student is praised for their accomplishments at home, they will excel not only in school but in society. How come some poverty stricken black and brown students make it and others do not? She made it, she is currently a teacher. Her mother was a teacher and her father was also a professional. I am sure in her home she was encouraged to study and she was rewarded for accomplishments.

Jan 26th
Reply

Anniebelle Harris

Douglas Giel thanks for your support

Feb 25th
Reply

Khysarth Gaming

esketit

Nov 29th
Reply

D Costa

Khysarth Gaming Essssskiiidiiiiit

Jan 29th
Reply
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