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Talk Python To Me

Author: Michael Kennedy (@mkennedy)

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Talk Python to Me is a weekly podcast hosted by Michael Kennedy.
The show covers a wide array of Python topics as well as many related
topics. Our goal is to bring you the human story behind the Python packages
and frameworks you know and love.
260 Episodes
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Did you come to Python from the academic side of the world? Maybe got into working with code for research or lab work and found you liked coding more than your first field of study. Whatever the reason, many people make the transition from the academic world over to tech and industry.
If you are listening to this episode when it came out, April 4th, 2020, there's a good chance you are listening at home, or on a walk. But it's probably not while commuting to an office as much of the world is practicing social distancing and working from home.
With radio astronomy, we can look across many light-years of distance and see incredible details such as the chemical makeup of a given region. Kevin Vinsen and Rodrigo Tobar from ICRAR are using the world's fastest supercomputer along with some sweet Python to process the equivalent of 1,600 hours of standard- definition YouTube video per second.
Have you come across a GitHub repo with a Jupyter notebook that has a "Run in Binder" button? It seems magical. How does it know what dependencies and external libraries you might need? Where does it run anyway?
Modern cars have become mobile computer systems with many small computers running millions of lines of code. On this episode, we plug a little Python into those data streams.
How do you go from poking around at Python code to actually solving real problems, the right way?
#253 Moon base geekout

#253 Moon base geekout

2020-02-2501:22:48

This episode is a unique one. On this episode, I've invited Richard Campbell and developer and podcaster who also dives deep into science and tech topics. We are going to dig into his geekout series and spend some time talking realistically about moonbases and space travel.
Did you come into Python from a computational science side of things? Were you just looking for something better than Excel or Matlab and got pulled in by all the Python has to offer?
What does it take to build a Python library that will be used by a large number of developers? This happens all the in open source. Projects take off and become wildly successful.
As the popularity of Python grows, we see it popping up in all sorts of interesting places and projects. On this episode, you'll meet C.K. Sample and Nathan Papapietro from HyperGiant. They are using Python and AI to develop the EOS Bioreactor.
Are you learning or helping someone else learn Python, why not make a game out of it? TwilioQuest is a game that doesn't treat you with kid-gloves while teaching you Python. Using your editor of choice, write code on your machine, and still play the game to solve Python challenges.
The most critical issue of our time is climate change. Yet, when you think about our carbon impact in the software industry, what comes to mind? Business travel? Commuting to the office so you don't miss filing that TPS report? Yeah, those are bad. But data centers, servers, and our apps consume a substantial portion of the total energy used by modern humans.
Do you run an open-source project? Does it seem like you never have enough time to support it? Have you considered starting one but are unsure you can commit to it? It's a real challenge.
When you can call yourself a professional developer? Sure, getting paid to write code is probably part of the formula. But when is your skillset up to that level?
Python is growing incredibly quickly and has found its place in many facets of the developer and computational space. But one area that is still shaky and uncertain is packaging and shipping software to users.
We've come to the end of 2019. Python 2 has just a handful of days before it goes unsupported. And I've met up with Dan Bader from RealPython.com to look back at the year of Python articles on his website. We dive into the details behind 10 of his most important articles from the past year.
We all love the Python language. But it's the 200,000+ packages that actually make Python incredibly useful and productive. But installing these libraries and sometimes even Python itself can vary across platforms. In particular, Windows has had a hard time.
Online education has certainly gone mainstream. Developers and companies have finally gotten comfortable taking online courses. Sometimes these are recorded, self-paced courses like we have at Talk Python Training. Other times, they are more like live events in webcast format.
Open source has permeated much of the software industry. What about health care? This highly regulated and important industry might seem to be the domain of huge specialized software companies.
You might use Python every day. But how much do you know about what happens under the covers, down at the C level? When you type something like variable = [], what are the byte-codes that accomplish this? How about the class backing the list itself?
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Comments (23)

J Bit

great episode! I've been using Python on Windows for the past two years and I love it. I've never had any problems specific to Windows.

Dec 19th
Reply (1)

Hossein Fakhari

at the 53:12 what is the package name? pip install eo? eil?

Sep 16th
Reply

Dan Stromberg

Pyodide is undeniably cool. There's also a micropython port to wasm that might make sense for basic webapps.

May 18th
Reply

Antonio Andrade

ummm. But the mic sounds terrible hahah

Apr 22nd
Reply

Kelechi Emenike

you remind me of me! excellent Googler, master of science, business-related experience, passionate about teaching... the only thing I've not done like you is actually create my own course... you wanna take on a mentee? I'm game please ^--^

Apr 6th
Reply

Patryk Siewiera

I listen for a year, I fell like Michael Kennedy is my best friend, im so grateful for showing me that excitement and possibilities with this language, this is my new road in life. thanks so much 10/10

Mar 7th
Reply

ねじまきラジオ

Python勉強中の方は必聴!

Feb 16th
Reply

Ketan Ramteke

Stackoverflow users are really mean but I still love it, there is no better alternative to it and the meanness keeps bad contents at bay. So it's good to be mean I guess.

Dec 11th
Reply

Gino DAnimal

What ide does she use? audio choppy.

Nov 20th
Reply (1)

Naufal

Mantul gan

Oct 7th
Reply

Nihan Dip

A great episode, lot's of information to digest. Glad to know how one of the tools that i use daily actually works.

Sep 21st
Reply

GreatBahram

Gentle introduction to machine learning libraries in Python

Aug 2nd
Reply

Saul Cruz

this episode really motivated me to get started on online trainings...if you know something, learn it, and share it...

Jul 19th
Reply

GreatBahram

It is good for anyone who does not have any idea about CI.

Jul 8th
Reply

GreatBahram

if you wanna get familiarr with static site generator, this episode gonna help you a lot

Jun 15th
Reply

Antonio Andrade

This is the deal: blockchain requires tons of energy.. therefore it should be used only where truth between parties is required.

Jun 10th
Reply

Nate S

amazing

May 25th
Reply

kumar prateek

Best podcast on python

May 11th
Reply

Bobby Anaya

Love everything about this podcast. Thank you!

Jan 18th
Reply

ramayan yadav

awesome

Dec 2nd
Reply
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